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Longer titles found: Military of the Sasanian Empire (view), List of kings of the Sasanian Empire (view), Immortals (Sasanian Empire) (view), Women in the Sasanian Empire (view), Timeline of the Sasanian Empire (view), Administrative divisions of the Sasanian Empire (view)

searching for Sasanian Empire 189 found (1985 total)

alternate case: sasanian Empire

Adi ibn Zayd (254 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Adi ibn Zayd al-Ibadi (Arabic: عَدِيُّ بْنُ زَيْدٍ العِبَادِيُّ‎, romanized: ʿAdī ibn Zayd al-ʿIbādī) was a 6th-century Arab Christian poet from an Ibadi
Third Perso-Turkic War (1,545 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Third Perso-Turkic War was the third and final conflict between the Sassanian Empire and the Western Turkic Khaganate. Unlike the previous two wars
Nestorian Schism (403 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Nestorian Schism (431), in church history, involved a split between the Christian churches of Sassanid Persia, which affiliated with Nestorius, and
Shirin (1,419 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shirin (? – 628 AD) (Persian: شیرین‎) was a wife of the Sassanid Persian Shahanshah (king of kings), Khosrow Parviz. In the revolution after the death
Shah (1,747 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shah (/ʃɑː/; Persian: شاه‎, romanized: Šāh, pronounced [ʃɒːh], "king") is a title given to the emperors, kings, princes and lords of Iran (historically
Vinduyih (85 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vinduyih (Middle Persian: Windōē) or Bendoy (Persian: بندوی‎) was a Sasanian nobleman from the Ispahbudhan family. His sister was the mother of Khosrau
Babowai (464 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Babowai (also Babaeus or Mar Babwahi) (died 484) was Catholicos of Seleucia-Ctesiphon and Patriarch of the Church of the East from 457 to 484, during the
Paul (Nestorian patriarch) (300 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Paul was briefly Patriarch of the Church of the East in 539. He is included in the traditional list of patriarchs of the Church of the East. Brief accounts
Katoghike Tsiranavor Church of Avan (799 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Holy Mother of God Katoghike Church of Avan (Armenian: Ավանի Սուրբ Աստվածածին Կաթողիկե Եկեղեցի (Avani Surb Astvatsatsin Kat'oghike Yekeghets'i); also Katoghike
Dadisho (164 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mar Dadishoʿ was Catholicos of the East from 421 AD to 456 AD. During his reign as Catholicos, in 424 AD, the Church of the East declared itself independent
Maremmeh (401 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maremmeh was patriarch of the Church of the East from 646 to 649. Brief accounts of Maremmeh's patriarchate are given in the Chronicle of Seert (an anonymous
Siege of Antioch (253) (66 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Siege of Antioch took place when the Sassanids under Shapur I besieged the Roman city of Antioch in 253 after defeating the Romans in the Battle of
Yahballaha I (374 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yahballaha I was bishop of Seleucia-Ctesiphon, grand metropolitan and primate of the Church of the East from 415 to 420. He is included in the traditional
Ishoyahb I (404 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ishoʿyahb I of Arzun was patriarch of the Church of the East from 582 to 595. His name is included in the traditional list of patriarchs of the Church
Narsai (Nestorian patriarch) (363 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Narsai was Patriarch of the Church of the East during a period of schism from 524 to 537. Unlike his opponent Elishaʿ, who is included in the traditional
Gregory (Nestorian patriarch) (423 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Gregory of Prat was patriarch of the Church of the East from 605 to 609. His name is included in the traditional list of patriarchs of the Church of the
Siege of Constantinople (626) (1,719 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Siege of Constantinople in 626 by the Sassanid Persians and Avars, aided by large numbers of allied Slavs, ended in a strategic victory for the Byzantines
Shila (Nestorian patriarch) (385 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Shila was Patriarch of the Church of the East from 503 to 523. He is included in the traditional list of patriarchs of the Church of the East. Brief accounts
Philosopher king (714 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
According to Plato, a philosopher king is a ruler who possesses both a love of wisdom, as well as intelligence, reliability, and a willingness to live
House of Mihran (499 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The House of Mihrān or House of Mehrān (Middle Persian: 𐭬𐭨𐭥𐭠𐭭), was a leading Iranian noble family (šahrdārān), one of the Seven Great Houses of the
Shila (Nestorian patriarch) (385 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Shila was Patriarch of the Church of the East from 503 to 523. He is included in the traditional list of patriarchs of the Church of the East. Brief accounts
Mesrop Mashtots (2,128 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mesrop Mashtots listen (help·info) (Armenian: Մեսրոպ Մաշտոց Mesrop Maštoc'; Eastern Armenian: [mɛsˈɾop maʃˈtotsʰ]; Western Armenian: [mɛsˈɾob maʃˈdotsʰ];
Tomarsa (487 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tomarsa (or Tamuza) was bishop of Seleucia-Ctesiphon and primate of the Church of the East from 363 to 371. He took office at the end of the great persecution
House of Mihran (499 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The House of Mihrān or House of Mehrān (Middle Persian: 𐭬𐭨𐭥𐭠𐭭), was a leading Iranian noble family (šahrdārān), one of the Seven Great Houses of the
Sabrisho I (217 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sabrisho I (also Sabr-Ishu) was Patriarch of the Church of the East from 596 to 604, during the rule of King Khosrau II. The son of a shepherd from the
Farbokht (441 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Farbokht (or Marabokht) served briefly as bishop of Seleucia-Ctesiphon, grand metropolitan and primate of the Church of the East in 421. He is included
Shushanik (191 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
'Shushanik (Armenian: Շուշանիկ, Georgian: შუშანიკი), born Vardeni Mamikonian (c. 440 – 475) was a Christian Armenian woman who was tortured to death by
Battle of Burs (170 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Burs was a minor engagement in 636 AD at Burs or Birs Nimrud, now in central Iraq, during the Muslim conquest of the Sassanid empire. The
Mihr Hormozd (157 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hormizd killed. Pourshariati, Parvaneh (2008). Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian-Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran. London
Joseph (Nestorian patriarch) (383 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Joseph was Patriarch of the Church of the East from 552 to 567. He was immensely unpopular, and was eventually deposed by his bishops. He was notorious
Siege of Caesarea Cappadocia (260) (183 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Siege of Caesarea took place when the Sassanids under Shapur I besieged the Roman city of Antioch in 260 after winning over the Romans in the Battle
Elisha (Nestorian patriarch) (435 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Elishaʿ was Patriarch of the Church of the East during a period of schism from 524 to 537. Unlike his opponent Narsai, who was also consecrated as catholicus
Qayyoma (552 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Qayyoma was bishop of Seleucia-Ctesiphon and primate of the Church of the East during the final decades of the fourth century. He is traditionally believed
Al-Nu'man III ibn al-Mundhir (1,377 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Nu'mān III ibn al-Mundhir (Arabic: النعمان بن المنذر‎), also transcribed Na'aman, Nu'aman and Noman and often known by the patronymic Abu Qabus (أبو
Shahdost (1,405 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shahdost was Bishop of Seleucia-Ctesiphon and primate of the Church of the East from 341 to 343. He was martyred during the great persecution of Shapur
Ahha (501 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mar Ahha or Ahai (Ancient Greek: Ἀχαιός, romanized: Achaeus) was bishop of Seleucia-Ctesiphon, grand metropolitan and primate of the Church of the East
Battle of Babylon (636) (371 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Battle of Babylon was fought between the forces of Sassanid Empire and Rashidun Caliphate in 636. Muslim Arabs won the encounter to maintain their pursuit
Maria (daughter of Maurice) (499 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Maria or Maryam was, according to the 12th-century chronicle of Michael the Syrian, a daughter of the Byzantine emperor Maurice, and wife of the Sassanid
Barbad (579 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Barbad (Persian: بربد‎) or Barbad-ī Marvazi (Persian: باربد جهرمی‎ / باربد / باربذ) was a Persian musician of the Sassanid era, who lived during the rule
Mana (patriarch) (849 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Maʿna served briefly as bishop of Seleucia-Ctesiphon, grand metropolitan and primate of the Church of the East in 420. Like several other early bishops
Battle of Zumail (1,092 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Arab Muslims attacked the Christian-Arab forces, loyal to the Sasanian Empire, from three different sides. The Christian-Arab forces were unable
Battle of Buwaib (270 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Battle of Buwaib (Arabic: معركة البويب‎) was fought between the Sassanid Empire and the Rashidun Caliphate soon after the Battle of the Bridge. Battle
Papa (bishop) (686 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Papa (died c. 327/328), also known as Papa bar Aggai, was Bishop of Seleucia-Ctesiphon, the capital of Sassanid Persia, in the late 3rd and early 4th century
Acacius of Seleucia-Ctesiphon (796 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Acacius was Catholicos of Seleucia-Ctesiphon and Patriarch of the Church of the East from 485 to 496. His tenure was marked by internal christological
Movses Khorenatsi (3,533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Movses Khorenatsi (ca. 410–490s AD; Armenian: Մովսես Խորենացի, pronounced [mɔvˈsɛs χɔɾɛnɑˈtsʰi], also written as Movses Xorenac‘i and Moses of Khoren,
Acepsimas of Hnaita (372 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Acepsimas of Hnaita (died October 10, 376) was a bishop, martyr and saint. Acepsimas was the bishop of Hnaita, residing at Paka in western Persia. He and
Damascius (1,181 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Damascius (/dəˈmæʃəs/; Greek: Δαμάσκιος, c. 458 – after 538), known as "the last of the Neoplatonists," was the last scholarch of the School of Athens
Siege of Herat (652) (255 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Siege of Herat was part of the Islamic conquest of Persia which was commanded by Ahnaf ibn Qais. Caliph Umar (634-644) launched an offensive against
Heraclius' campaign of 622 (362 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Heraclius' campaign of 622, erroneously also known as the Battle of Issus, was a major campaign in the Byzantine–Sassanid War of 602–628 by emperor
House of Zik (64 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The House of Zik (also recorded as House of Zix; Middle Persian: zikan, transl. Ziks; New Persian: dodmane zik, transl. Zik family) was an Iranian noble
Siege of Pirisabora (515 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Siege of Pirisabora took place when the Roman Emperor Julian besieged the fortified city of Pirisabora under Mamersides in April 363. After two days
Siege of Dura-Europos (256) (557 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Siege of Dura Europos took place when the Sasanians under Shapur I besieged the Roman city of Dura-Europos in 256 after capturing Antioch. Dura-Europos
Valerian (emperor) (2,000 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Valerian (/vəˈlɪəriən/; Latin: Publius Licinius Valerianus; c. 199 – 260 or 264) was Roman emperor from 22 October 253 to spring 260 AD. He was taken captive
Demetrius of Antioch (114 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Demetrius was bishop of Antioch in the 3rd century AD. In 253 he was taken to Persia as a captive by Shapur I, where he became the first bishop of Gundeshapur
Suristan (97 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 32°2′49.4″N 44°22′10.8″E / 32.047056°N 44.369667°E / 32.047056; 44.369667 Suristan was used as a name in two senses during the Sassanid
Sahak II Bagratuni (330 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sahak II Bagratuni (Armenian: Սահակ Բ Բագրատունի), was an Armenian nobleman from the Bagratuni Dynasty. He served as the marzban of Persian Armenia from
Valerian (emperor) (2,000 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Valerian (/vəˈlɪəriən/; Latin: Publius Licinius Valerianus; c. 199 – 260 or 264) was Roman emperor from 22 October 253 to spring 260 AD. He was taken captive
Amr ibn Adi (663 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Amr ibn Adi ibn Nasr ibn Rabi'a (Arabic: عمرو بن عدي بن نصر بن ربيعة‎, romanized: ʿAmr ibn ʿAdī ibn Naṣr ibn Rabīʿa) was the semi-legendary first Lakhmid
Battle of Antioch (613) (711 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Battle of Antioch took place in 613 outside Antioch, Turkey between a Byzantine army led by Emperor Heraclius and a Persian Sassanid army under Generals
Rava (amora) (1,797 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
For the third generation Amora sage of Babylon, with a similar name, see: Joseph b. Hama (his father). For another Amora sage of Babylon with a similar
Council of Seleucia-Ctesiphon (1,219 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Council of Seleucia-Ctesiphon, also called the Council of Mar Isaac, met in AD 410 in Seleucia-Ctesiphon, the capital of the Persian Sassanid Empire
Kontos (weapon) (443 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The kontos (Greek: κοντός) was the Greek name for a type of long wooden cavalry lance used by Iranian, especially Achaemenid successors' cavalry, most
Bademus (427 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bademus (also known as Bademe and Vadim) was a rich, noble citizen of Bethlapeta in Persia, who founded a monastery nearby. He and some of his disciples
Demetrius of Antioch (114 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Demetrius was bishop of Antioch in the 3rd century AD. In 253 he was taken to Persia as a captive by Shapur I, where he became the first bishop of Gundeshapur
Siege of Caesarea Maritima (614) (225 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Siege of Caesarea relates to the siege and conquest of Caesarea Maritima of the Byzantine Empire's Palaestina Prima province by the Sasanian Persians
Adur Gushnasp (937 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ref=harv (link) Pourshariati, Parvaneh (2008). Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian-Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran. London
Ezekiel (Nestorian patriarch) (1,715 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Ezekiel was patriarch of the Church of the East from 570 to 581. He is principally remembered in the popular tradition for having called his bishops 'the
Anastasius of Persia (548 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Anastasius of Persia (whose given name was Magundat), was originally a Zoroastrian soldier in the Sasanian army. He later became a convert to Christianity
Abdas of Susa (513 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abdas, (also Abda, Abdias, and Audas) was bishop of Susa in Iran. Socrates of Constantinople calls him "bishop of Persia". He was executed under the orders
Theodore Rshtuni (533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theodore Rshtuni (Armenian: Թեոդորոս Ռշտունի, Armenian pronunciation: [tʰɛodoɾos ərəʃtuni], also spelled Theodoros Ṛštuni; 590 - 654/655 AD), equated with
Mushegh II Mamikonian (243 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Vinduyih, who made the king's son, Khosrau II, the new king of the Sasanian Empire. However, shortly after the coronation of the new king, Bahram Chobin
Varaztirots II Bagratuni (493 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 0-521-20160-8. Pourshariati, Parvaneh (2008). Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian-Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran. London
Bacurius III of Iberia (151 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bakur III (Georgian: ბაკურ III, Latinized as Bacurius) (died 580) was the last Chosroid king of Iberia (natively known as Kartli; ancient Georgia) upon
Al-Mundhir I ibn al-Nu'man (338 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Mundhir ibn al-Nuʿmān (Arabic: المنذر بن النعمان‎) was the seventh Lakhmid king (418-461). His mother's name was Hind bint Zayd-Manāt ibn Zayd-Allah
Theodore Rshtuni (533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theodore Rshtuni (Armenian: Թեոդորոս Ռշտունի, Armenian pronunciation: [tʰɛodoɾos ərəʃtuni], also spelled Theodoros Ṛštuni; 590 - 654/655 AD), equated with
Varaztirots II Bagratuni (493 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 0-521-20160-8. Pourshariati, Parvaneh (2008). Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian-Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran. London
Aspacures II of Iberia (162 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aspacures II (or Varaz-Bakur I, Georgian: ვარაზ-ბაკურ I), of the Chosroid Dynasty, was the king of Iberia (Kartli, eastern Georgia) from c. 363 to 365
Benjamin the Deacon and Martyr (412 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Benjamin (AD 329 – c. 424) was a deacon martyred circa 424 in Persia. Benjamin was executed during a period of persecution of Christians that lasted forty
Bacurius III of Iberia (151 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bakur III (Georgian: ბაკურ III, Latinized as Bacurius) (died 580) was the last Chosroid king of Iberia (natively known as Kartli; ancient Georgia) upon
Stephen I of Iberia (531 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Stephen I (Georgian: სტეფანოზ I, Step'anoz I) (died 627), of the Guaramid Dynasty, was a presiding prince of Iberia (Kartli, central and eastern Georgia)
Naval history of Iran (1,238 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Iranian Navy traditionally located in the shallow waters of the Persian Gulf, has always been the smallest of the country's military forces. An Iranian
Qabus ibn al-Mundhir (184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Qabus ibn al-Mundhir (Arabic: قابوس ابن المنذر; in Greek sources Καβόσης, Kaboses) was the king of the Lakhmid Arabs from 569 to 573. His name is an Arabic
First Council of Dvin (503 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The First Council of Dvin (Armenian: Դվինի առաջին ժողով, Dvini ařaĵin žoğov or Դվինի Ա ժողով, Dvini A žoğov) was a church council held in 506 in the city
Philoxenus of Mabbug (825 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Philoxenus of Mabbug (Syriac: ܐܟܣܢܝܐ ܡܒܘܓܝܐ, Aksenāyâ Mabûḡāyâ) (died 523), also known as Xenaias and Philoxenus of Hierapolis, was one of the most notable
Leontine martyrs (293 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Leontine Martyrs were a group of people who were killed after a long period of captivity in Persia. They were executed by the order of King Yazdegerd
Nvarsak Treaty (354 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Nvarsak Treaty was signed between the Armenian general Vahan Mamikonian and the representatives of the Sassanian Persian king Balash at Nvarsak in
Perpetual Peace (532) (632 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Perpetual Peace (Greek: ἀπέραντος εἰρήνη), signed in 532 between the East Roman (Byzantine) Empire and Sassanid Persia, was a peace treaty of indefinite
Amr ibn Imru al-Qays (115 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
'Amr ibn Imru' al-Qays (Arabic: عمرو بن امرؤ القيس‎) was the third Lakhmid king of al-Hirah, reigning in 328–363. A son of the famed Imru' al-Qays ibn
Peace of Acilisene (121 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Peace of Acilisene was a treaty between the East Roman Empire and the Sassanid Empire sometime between 384 and 390 (usually dated to 387) which divided
Vache II of Albania (153 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Vachagan III. Pourshariati, Parvaneh (2008). Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian-Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran. London
Al-Mundhir IV ibn al-Mundhir (335 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Mundhir IV ibn al-Mundhir (Arabic: المنذر بن المنذر‎) was the king of the Lakhmid Arabs in 575–580. The son of al-Mundhir III ibn al-Nu'man (r. 502–554)
Zanitas and Lazarus of Persia (272 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Zanitas and Lazarus of Persia (died March 27, 326) were martyrs of the Christian church. They were monks. With their companions Maruthas, Narses, Helias
Behnam, Sarah, and the Forty Martyrs (1,280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saints Behnam, Sarah, and the Forty Martyrs were 4th-century Christians who suffered martyrdom during the reign of Shapur II. They are venerated as saints
Mihrdat V of Iberia (95 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mihrdat V (Georgian: მირდატ V, Latinized as Mithridates), of the Chosroid Dynasty, was the king of Iberia (Kartli, eastern Georgia) reigning, according
Mihrdat IV of Iberia (107 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mihrdat IV (Georgian: მირდატ IV, Latinized as Mithridates), of the Chosroid Dynasty, was the king of Iberia (Kartli, eastern Georgia) from c. 409 to 411
Peace of Acilisene (121 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Peace of Acilisene was a treaty between the East Roman Empire and the Sassanid Empire sometime between 384 and 390 (usually dated to 387) which divided
Pharasmanes V of Iberia (169 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
P'arsman V (Georgian: ფარსმან V, sometimes Latinized as Pharasmanes), of the Chosroid Dynasty, was the king of Iberia (Kartli, eastern Georgia) from 547
Fifty-Year Peace Treaty (324 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
return to their homes. In a separate treaty, the Christians in the Sasanian Empire were promised freedom of religion. The peace treaty was to last for
Imru al-Qays II ibn Amr (81 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Imru' al-Qays II ibn 'Amr (Arabic: امرؤ القيس بن عمرو‎) was the fifth ruler of the Lakhmid Arabs at al-Hirah, reigning ca. 368–390. As with most 4th-century
Vard Mamikonian (307 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vard Mamikonian (Armenian: Վարդ Մամիկոնյան) was an Armenian nobleman from the Mamikonian family. He served as the marzban of Persian Armenia from 505/510
Christina of Persia (418 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Great's Life of George and the Propagation of Doctrine in the Late Sasanian Empire", Portraits of Spiritual Authority (Brill, 1999), p. 172n. David Wilmshurst
Mardanshah (Sasanian prince) (113 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
II (r. 590–628) and Shirin, and was the preferred successor of the Sasanian Empire. He was later killed along with his brothers and half-brothers by his
Archil of Iberia (164 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arch'il (Georgian: არჩილი), of the Chosroid Dynasty, was the king of Iberia (Kartli, eastern Georgia) from c. 411 to 435. He was the son and successor
Muslim conquest of Khorasan (2,035 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Muslim conquest of Khorasan was the last phase of the heavy war between the Rashidun caliphate against Sassanid Empire. In 642 the Sassanid Empire was
Pharasmanes VI of Iberia (88 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
P'arsman VI (Georgian: ფარსმან VI, sometimes Latinized as Pharasmanes), of the Chosroid Dynasty, became the king of Iberia (Kartli, eastern Georgia) in
Dachi of Iberia (205 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dachi (Georgian: დაჩი, also Darchi, დარჩი, or Darchil, დარჩილი), of the Chosroid Dynasty, was the king of Iberia (Kartli, eastern Georgia) reigning, according
Ahudemmeh (492 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ahudemmeh was the Metropolitan of the East of the Syriac Orthodox Church, from 559 until his execution in 575. Ahudemmeh was born in the 6th century into
Siege of Ctesiphon (637) (1,999 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Siege of Ctesiphon took place from January to March, 637 between the forces of Sassanid Empire and Rashidun Caliphate. Ctesiphon, located on the eastern
Acacius of Amida (415 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Acacius of Amida (died 425) was Bishop of Amida, Mesopotamia (modern-day Turkey) from 400 to 425, during the reign of the Eastern Roman Emperor Theodosius
Mjej I Gnuni (210 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mjej I Gnuni (Armenian: Մժեժ Ա Գնունի), was an Armenian nobleman from the Gnuni family, who served as the marzban of Persian Armenia from 518 to 548. Between
Varaz Vzur (170 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Varaz Vzur was an Armenian nobleman who served as the marzban of Persian Armenia from 579 to 580. In 579, he succeeded Tamkhosrau as the marzban of Armenia
Nagisa (harpist) (333 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Nagisa (from Persian negin ["jewel"],(Negin-Sa) [ This combination exists in other female Iranian names like : "Pari-Sa", "Mehr-Sa", "Gol-Sa", "Rokh-Sa"
Vasak Siwni (142 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vasak Siwni (Armenian: Վասակ Սյունի; d. 452) was an Armenian prince, who was the lord of the principality of Syunik from 413 to 452, and also served as
George of Izla (563 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George of Izla (Classical Syriac: ܓܝܘܪܓܝܣ ܕܐܝܙܠܐ‎, Gēwargis d'Izlā, born Mihrām-gušnasp or Mihr-Māh-gošnasp, died 615 A.D.) was an East Syriac martyr,
Qumis (region) (259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Qūmis (قومس; Arabized form of the Persian name کومس Kōmis or کومش Kōmiš; Ancient Greek: Κωμισηνή Cōmisēnē; Old Armenian: Կոմշ Komsh), was an important
Manuel Mamikonian (238 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Manuel Mamikonian was the real leader of Armenia after the exile of King Varasdates (Varazdat) who ruled from 374 until 378. The Mamikonian family had
Valash (164 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
prominent Iranian nobleman who controlled much of the affairs of the Sasanian Empire. In 665, Valash murdered Farrukhzad who was the ruler of Tabaristan
Qumis (region) (259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Qūmis (قومس; Arabized form of the Persian name کومس Kōmis or کومش Kōmiš; Ancient Greek: Κωμισηνή Cōmisēnē; Old Armenian: Կոմշ Komsh), was an important
George of Izla (563 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George of Izla (Classical Syriac: ܓܝܘܪܓܝܣ ܕܐܝܙܠܐ‎, Gēwargis d'Izlā, born Mihrām-gušnasp or Mihr-Māh-gošnasp, died 615 A.D.) was an East Syriac martyr,
Battle of Jalula (1,363 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Jalula was fought between Sassanid Empire and Rashidun Caliphate soon after conquest of Ctesiphon. After the capture of Ctesiphon, several
Nagisa (harpist) (333 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Nagisa (from Persian negin ["jewel"],(Negin-Sa) [ This combination exists in other female Iranian names like : "Pari-Sa", "Mehr-Sa", "Gol-Sa", "Rokh-Sa"
Kawus (305 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(2008), p. 289 Pourshariati, Parvaneh (2008). Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian-Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran. London
Simon of Bet-Titta (95 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Simon of Bet-Titta (died 447) was a Christian martyr at Bet-Titta, near Karka in Mesopotamia. He was martyred with several colleagues, including Abraham
Bacurius II of Iberia (92 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bakur II (Georgian: ბაკურ II, Latinized as Bacurius), of the Chosroid Dynasty, was a king of Iberia (natively known as Kartli; ancient Georgia) from 534
Aspacures III of Iberia (144 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aspacures III (or Varaz-Bakur II, Georgian: ვარაზ-ბაკურ II), of the Chosroid Dynasty, was the king of Iberia (Kartli, eastern Georgia) from c. 380 to 394
Theodore Bar Konai (381 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theodore Bar Konai (Syriac: ܬܐܕܘܪܘܣ ܒܪ ܟܘܢܝ‎) was a distinguished Assyrian exegete and apologist of the Church of the East who seems to have flourished
Rabban Hormizd (504 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rabban Mar Hormizd (Classical Syriac: ܕܪܒܢ ܗܘܪܡܙܕ‎) was a monk who lived in the seventh century in modern northern Iraq. Rabban is the Syriac term for
Trdat of Iberia (172 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Trdat (Georgian: თრდატი, sometimes Latinized as Tiridates), of the Chosroid Dynasty, was the king of Iberia (Kartli, eastern Georgia) from c. 394 to 406
Mushegh III Mamikonian (324 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
CITEREFToumanoff1990 (help) Pourshariati, Parvaneh (2008). Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian-Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran. London
Hormizd (son of Hormizd II) (208 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Hormizd (Middle Persian; in Ancient Greek: Ὁρμίσδας Hormisdas, Ormisdas; Persian: هرمز‎) was a Sassanid Persian prince, the third son of King Hormizd II
Varaz Grigor (71 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Varaz Grigor - was the Mihranid king of Caucasian Albania from 628 until his death in 638, he was Prince of Gardman before his baptism. He was acknowledged
Rev II of Iberia (161 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rev II (Georgian: რევ II) was a prince of Iberia of the Chosroid Dynasty (natively known as Kartli, eastern Georgia) who functioned as a co-king to his
Paul the Persian (585 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paul the Persian or Paulus Persa was a 6th-century East Syriac theologian and philosopher who worked at the court of the Sassanid king Khosrau I. He wrote
Aba of Kashkar (74 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Aba was a priest who was martyred at Kashkar, Persia with Saints Abda and Abdjesus and approximately 48 others. They were put to death in the year
Kardarigan (7th century) (444 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Kardarigan (Greek: Καρδαριγάν) was a Sassanid Persian general of the early 7th century, who fought in the Byzantine-Sassanid War of 602–628. He is usually
Urnayr (281 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Urnayr was the third Arsacid king of Caucasian Albania from approximately 350 to 375. He was the successor of Vache I (r. 336–350). The Treaty of Nisibis
Hormizd of Sakastan (264 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Sakastan. Pourshariati, Parvaneh (2008). Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian-Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran. London
Peroz (Mihranid) (185 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
ref=harv (link) Pourshariati, Parvaneh (2008). Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian-Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran. London
Coutzes (259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coutzes or Cutzes (Greek: Κούτζης; fl. 528) was a general of the Byzantine Empire during the reign of Emperor Justinian I (r. 527–565). Coutzes appears
Gabriel of Qatar (433 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gabriel of Qatar, also known as Gabriel Qaṭraya bar Lipeh, was a Qatari Syriac writer of the Church of the East. He wrote a commentary on the East Syrian
Ajabel (51 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ajabel was the name of a priest martyred with Abda and Abdjesus in Kaskhar on May 16, 366, and several others. They are memorialized in the Christian Church
Abdon and Sennen (569 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saints Abdon and Sennen, variously written in early calendars and martyrologies Abdo, Abdus, and Sennes, Sennis, Zennen, are recognized by the Roman Catholic
Bamshad (105 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bamshad (in Persian: بامشاد) was one of the four most famous and skilled musicians (with Barbad, Nagisa (Nakisa), and Ramtin) who lived in the Persian
Shushandukht (250 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shushandukht (Middle Persian: 𐭱𐭩𐭱𐭩𐭭𐭲𐭥𐭤𐭲‎ <šyšyntwḥt|> Šīšīntūḥt; New Persian: شوشاندخت Šušanduxt) was the wife of Yazdegerd I and mother of Bahram
Abrosima (121 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abrosima was a Persian Christian priest and martyr. His name is also listed as Abrosimus. He was stoned to death with many of his parishioners in 341 or
Vachagan III (154 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vachagan III the Pious was the last Armenian king of Caucasian Albania from the Arsacid Dynasty. He was a brother of Vache II and was restored to the throne
Gil Gavbara (286 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ref=harv (link) Pourshariati, Parvaneh (2008). Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian-Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran. London
Razhden the Protomartyr (531 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Razhden (Georgian: რაჟდენი, romanized: razhdeni, also transliterated as Ražden or Rajden; died c. 457) was a 5th-century Persian nobleman in the service
Eulamius (153 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eulamius (/juːˈleɪmiəs/; Greek: Eὐλάμιος), born in Phrygia, was, along with Damascius, one of the Athenian philosophers who sought asylum at the court
Narsai (792 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Narsai (sometimes spelt Narsay, Narseh or Narses; Classical Syriac: ܢܪܣܝ‎, Narsai, name derived from Pahlavi Narsēh from Avestan Nairyō.saȵhō, meaning
Pharasmanes IV of Iberia (230 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
P'arsman IV (Georgian: ფარსმან IV, sometimes Latinized as Pharasmanes), of the Chosroid Dynasty, was the king of Iberia (Kartli, eastern Georgia) from
Abraham the Great of Kashkar (364 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abraham the Great of Kashkar was the father of the Assyrian monastic revival in the 6th century. He is hailed as a doctor and saint of the Assyrian Church
Babai the Great (2,156 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Babai the Great (ܒܐܒܐܝ ܡܚܡܘܕܐ c. 551 – 628) was an early church father of the Church of the East. He set several of the foundational pillars of the Church
Balendukht (123 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Balendukht or Balendokht (Georgian: ბალენდუხტი) was a Sasanian princess and Queen of Iberia. She was the daughter of Sasanian shah (king) Hormizd III.
Kayus (96 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
following a two-year war between an array of united kingdoms and the Sasanian Empire. Kayus was known as King of the Kardouchoian and ruled as an autonomous
Mihrdat III of Iberia (289 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mihrdat III (Georgian: მირდატ III, Latinized as Mithridates), of the Chosroid Dynasty, was the king of Iberia (Kartli, eastern Georgia) from c. 365 to
Kayus (96 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
following a two-year war between an array of united kingdoms and the Sasanian Empire. Kayus was known as King of the Kardouchoian and ruled as an autonomous
Siege of Theodosiopolis (189 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Siege of Theodosiopolis occurred in August 502, during the opening stages of the Anastasian War. The Sassanid ruler Kavadh I laid siege to the city
Abu Ya'fur ibn Alqama (210 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abu Ya'fur ibn Alqama ibn Malik ibn Uday ibn Dhumayl ibn Thawr ibn Asis ibn Ruba ibn Namara ibn Lakhm (Arabic: أبو يعفر بن علقمة بن مالك بن عدي بن الذميل
Shapur cave (428 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1400 years ago, after the Arab invasion of Iran and collapse of the Sasanian Empire, the statue was pulled down and a part of one of its legs was broken
Maruthas of Martyropolis (481 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Maruthas or Marutha of Martyropolis was a Syrian monk who became bishop of Maypherkat in Mesopotamia (Meiafarakin) for a period beginning before
Battle of Solachon (1,972 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Solachon was fought in 586 CE in northern Mesopotamia between the East Roman (Byzantine) forces, led by Philippicus, and the Sassanid Persians
Al-Nu'man II ibn al-Aswad (43 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Al-Nu'man II ibn al-Aswad (Arabic: النعمان بن الأسود‎) was the tenth Lakhmid king, reigning in 497–503 AD. His mother was Umm al-Mulk bint 'Amr ibn Hajar
Meruzhan Artsruni (197 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Meruzhan Artzruni (Armenian: Մերուժան Արծրունի Meružan Arcruni, transliteration differs; can also be spelled Merujan, Ardzruni, Artsruni, Artsrouni) (ruled
Siege of Martyropolis (502) (28 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Siege of Martyropolis occurred in 502, during the Anastasian War. The siege ended with a victory for the Sassanid Empire. http://www.iranicaonline
Domnentiolus (766 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Domnentiolus was a Byzantine military officer, active in the reign of Justinian I (r. 527–565). He is better known for his service in Sicily during the
Khuzestan Province (5,978 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Khuzestan Province (Persian: استان خوزستان‎ Ostān-e Khūzestān) is one of the 31 provinces of Iran. It is in the southwest of the country, bordering Iraq
Burzin Shah (200 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
272, 275–276 Pourshariati, Parvaneh (2008). Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian-Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran. London
Barzabod (185 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Barzabod, was the Mihranid prince of Gardman from c. 430 to 440. He was the son and successor of Khurs. According to the Georgian chronicler Juansher,
Shapurdukhtak (519 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shapurdukhtak (Middle Persian: Šābuhrduxtag, literally "daughter of Shapur") was a 3rd-century Sasanian queen (banbishn). She was the wife of her cousin
Sayf ibn Dhi Yazan (382 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sassanid Empire. To reconquer Yemen, Sayf asked Khosrau I king of the Sasanian Empire to help him fight the Askem. Khosrau agreed and sent 800 men with Wahriz
Mana of Bet-Parsaje (107 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For the martyr of 447 in Bet-Titta, see Simon of Bet-Titta. Mana of Bet-Parsaje was a Christian martyr under Shapur II, in November, 339. Mana was tortured
Mar Qardagh (268 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mār Qardāgh (Classical Syriac: ܣܗܕܐ ܡܪܝ ܩܪܕܓ ܐܬ݂ܘܪܝܐ‎), was a legendary Assyrian prince who was martyred for converting to Christianity. Qardāgh was born
Battle of Martyropolis (588) (379 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Battle of Martyropolis was fought in summer 588 near Martyropolis between an East Roman (Byzantine) and a Sassanid Persian army, and resulted in a
Sahdona (299 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sahdona of Halmon (Classical Syriac: ܣܗܕܘܢܐ‎, literally "little martyr") also known as Sahdona of Mahoze and Sahdona the Syrian, Hellenised as Martyrius
Sapor of Bet-Nicator (88 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sapor of Bet-Nicator (also known as Shapur of Bet-Nicator) was the Christian bishop of Bet-Nicator. He was reported with 4 companions to King Shapur II
Mihrajanqadhaq (128 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mihragan-kadag (Middle Persian), mentioned in Islamic works in the Arabized forms Mihrajanqadhaq (مهرجانقذق) and Mihrajan Qashaq, was a district and province
David of Basra (758 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
David of Basra, sometimes rendered Dudi of Basra or David of Charax, was a 3rd- and 4th-century CE Christian Metropolitan bishop who undertook missionary
List of Persian figures in the Sasanian era (138 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Here is a list of important Persian figures in the Sassanid Empire (226-651) : Mani the prophet : Founder of Manichaeism. Mazdak : Proto-socialist philosopher
Abarsam (115 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abarsam (Middle Persian: Apursām) was a high-ranking officer in Sasanian Iran, who served as the minister (wuzurg framadar) of king Ardashir I (r. 224–242)
Grumbates (621 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Grumbates or Krumbates was a king of the Chionitae, probably of the Kidarites tribe, an ancient nomadic tribe of Transoxiana. The exact origin of his name
Damnazes (280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Damnazes (Georgian: დამნაზე; Greek: Δαμνάζης; died 522) was a 6th-century king of Lazica (western Georgia), a contemporary of the Sassanid king of Iran
Yazdegerd (77 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
King, son of Bahram V Yazdegerd III (r. 632–651), last king of the Sasanian Empire Yazdagird (Bavandid ruler) (r. 1271–1300), ruler in Mazandaran Yazdgerd
Barsauma (664 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Barsauma (Syriac: ܒܪܨܘܡܐ‎, Barṣaumâ), nicknamed Bar Sula, "son of the shoe" in Syriac, was Metropolitan of Nisibis in the 5th century, and a major figure
Vassak Mamikonian (153 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vassak Mamikonian was the Armenian sparapet for King Arsaces II (Arshak II) (reigned c. 350-368). He was known to be a great general who had many victories
Zurvandukht (48 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Zurvandukht was a daughter of Shapur II, a Sasanian king of Iran. She was named after Zurvan, a deity in Zoroastrianism. Zurvanism Boyce 1984, pp. 117-118
Touraj Daryaee (2,520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(forthcoming 2012). Bibliographika Sasanika: Bibliographical Guide to the Sasanian Empire, vol. I Years 1990-1999, in collaboration with E. Venetis, M. Alinia
Mardanshah of Damavand (132 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mardanshah was an Iranian nobleman from the House of Karen, who was the founder of the Masmughans of Damavand dynasty, which included Larijan and its surrounding
Gabriel of Beth Qustan (517 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Gabriel of Beth Qustan (Syriac: ܡܪܝ ܓܒܪܐܝܠ‎: Mor Gabriel), also known as Saint Gabriel of Qartmin, was the Bishop of Tur Abdin until his death in