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searching for Salmanu 13 found (15 total)

alternate case: salmanu

Salmanlu (94 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article

سلمانلو‎, also Romanized as Salmānlū; also known as Salmālu, Salman, and Salmānū) is a village in Mojezat Rural District, in the Central District of Zanjan
Shalmaneser II (715 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Salmānu-ašarēd II, inscribed mdSILIM-ma-nu-MAŠ/SAG, meaning "(the god) Salmānu is foremost," was the king of Assyria 1030–1019 BC, the 93rd to appear on
Marduk-zakir-shumi I (1,444 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
antiquity as the dynasty of E. He was a contemporary of Assyrian kings, Salmānu-ašarēdu III) (commonly known, Shalmaneser III) (859–824 BC) and Šamši-Adad
Marduk-apla-usur (441 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Euphrates and paid tribute to Salmānu-ašarēdu III a generation or so earlier. His Assyrian contemporaries were probably Salmānu-ašarēdu IV (783 - 773 BC)
Ashur-nirari IV (381 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
confusion and a dearth of contemporary inscriptions. He succeeded his father, Salmānu-ašarēd II, whose twelve-year reign seems to have ended in confusion, as
Ashurnasirpal I (494 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
between the kingdoms during this period. He was succeeded by his son, Šalmanu-ašaredu II, who mentions him in one of his own inscriptions and later by
Ninurta-apal-Ekur (944 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and a recent publication proposes the following sequence: Salmanu-zera-iqiša Liptanu Salmanu-šumu-lešir Erib-Aššur Marduk-aḫa-eriš Pišqiya Aššur-dan I
Eclectic Chronicle (725 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Marduk-šāpik-zēri (ca. 1082–1069 BC) through to sometime after that of Salmānu-ašarid V (727–722 BC). The narrative is divided into twenty two extant
Kikkia (371 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
restorers on a commemorative cone, beginning with Kikkia. The later king, Salmānu-ašarēd III also restored this wall and gave credit to his predecessor in
Ashur-rim-nisheshu (381 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
original fortification of the city is repeated in one of the later king's, Salmānu-ašarēd III, own inscriptions. It was recovered from an old adobe wall three
Akkadian literature (2,891 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
inscription of Simbar-Šipak • Sag-gig-ga-meš (Muruṣ qaqqadi) • Sakikkū • Salmānu-ašarēdu III Epic • Synchronistic History • Șēru šikinšu • Šammu šikinšu
Tablet of Akaptaḫa (514 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
been annexed under the preceding reign of Adad-nārārī I (1307–1275 BC) or Salmānu-ašarēdu I (1274–1245 BC) and Akaptaḫa (a Hurrian name) seems to have been
Šēp lemutti (624 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the locations is addressed with an invocation followed by šiptu attunu ṣalmānu apkallu maṣṣari, “incantation: you are the statues of the apkallus, the