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Longer titles found: Royal Flying Corps Canada (view), Royal Flying Corps airfields (view), List of aircraft of the Royal Flying Corps (view), List of Royal Flying Corps generals (view), List of Royal Flying Corps squadrons (view), Hugh Trenchard as commander of the Royal Flying Corps in France (view)

searching for Royal Flying Corps 57 found (3073 total)

alternate case: royal Flying Corps

No. 109 Squadron RAF (424 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

Force. The squadron first formed on 1 November 1917 as 109 Squadron Royal Flying Corps at South Carlton and began training on the de Havilland DH.9 bomber
No. 75 Squadron RAF (1,446 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Royal New Zealand Air Force in 1945. Established as a unit of the Royal Flying Corps for Home Defence, it was formed at Goldington on 1 October 1916 with
No. 129 Squadron RAF (303 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 129 (Mysore) Squadron was a Royal Air Force squadron active during World War II. Like a number of Squadrons, No. 129 was initially formed during the
No. 200 Squadron RAF (513 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
having been renumbered No. 8 Squadron RAF. No. 200 Depot Squadron Royal Flying Corps was formed at East Retford on 1 July 1917, it operated the Royal Aircraft
No. 91 Squadron RAF (338 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No 91 (Nigeria) Squadron was a squadron of the Royal Air Force but is no longer operational. The name acknowledges the contribution made by Nigeria to
No. 148 Squadron RAF (426 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 148 Squadron of the Royal Air Force has been part of the RAF since the First World War. The squadron was formed at Andover Aerodrome on 10 February
No. 122 Squadron RAF (391 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 122 (Bombay) Squadron was a Royal Air Force fighter squadron during the First and Second World Wars. The squadron was formed on 1 January 1918 at Sedgeford
No. 97 Squadron RAF (425 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 97 (Straits Settlements) Squadron, was a Royal Air Force squadron formed on 1 December 1917 at Waddington, Lincolnshire. The squadron formed on 1 December
No. 199 Squadron RAF (448 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 199 Squadron was a Royal Air Force aircraft squadron that operated during the Second World War and later in the 1950s as a radar countermeasures squadron
No. 97 Squadron RAF (425 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 97 (Straits Settlements) Squadron, was a Royal Air Force squadron formed on 1 December 1917 at Waddington, Lincolnshire. The squadron formed on 1 December
No. 77 Squadron RAF (517 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 77 Squadron RAF was a squadron of the Royal Air Force which was active in various incarnations between 1916 and 1963. No. 77 Squadron was formed on
No. 123 Squadron RAF (414 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 123 Squadron of the Royal Air Force was a British aircraft squadron in the First and Second World Wars. It was disbanded for the last time on 20 June
No. 133 Squadron RAF (698 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
133 Squadron RAF was one of the famous Eagle Squadrons formed from American volunteers serving with the Royal Air Force (RAF) during the Second World War
No. 86 Squadron RAF (354 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 86 Squadron RAF was a unit of the Royal Air Force during World War II. Attached to Coastal Command the unit flew reconnaissance and air-sea rescue
No. 89 Squadron RAF (414 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 89 Squadron was a Royal Air Force squadron, mainly active in the fighter role during its existence. No. 89 squadron was formed on 1 September 1917
No. 119 Squadron RAF (653 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 119 Squadron RAF was a squadron of the Royal Air Force, flying with RAF Coastal Command during the Second World War. It was the only RAF unit flying
No. 141 Squadron RAF (392 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 141 Squadron of the Royal Air Force was formed on 1 January 1918 at Rochford, for home defence in the London Area. The Squadron moved to RAF Biggin
No. 26 Squadron RAF (751 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 26 Squadron of the Royal Air Force was formed in 1915 and was disbanded for the last time in 1976. The squadron's motto is N Wagter in die Lug (Afrikaans)
No. 104 Squadron RAF (734 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 104 Squadron RAF is a former squadron of the British Royal Air Force. The squadron was formed at Wyton, England on 4 September 1917 equipped with the
No. 94 Squadron RAF (345 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 94 Squadron RAF was a unit of the Royal Air Force that served during World War I & World War II. The squadron has been formed a total of four times
No. 93 Squadron RAF (304 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 93 Squadron RAF was an aircraft squadron of the Royal Air Force during World War II. It was initially formed during World War I on 1 September 1917
No. 49 Squadron RAF (979 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 49 Squadron was a bomber squadron of the Royal Air Force from 1938 to 1965. They were the first squadron to receive the Hampden in September 1938.
No. 34 Squadron RAF (671 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 34 Squadron RAF was a squadron of the Royal Air Force. During the First World War it operated as a reconnaissance and bomber squadron and in the 1930s
No. 70 Squadron RAF (959 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No.70 or LXX Squadron RAF provides strategic transport. The squadron was formed on 22 April 1916 at Farnborough, and was equipped with the Sopwith 1½ Strutter
No. 35 Squadron RAF (1,007 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 35 Squadron (also known as No. XXXV (Madras Presidency) Squadron) was a squadron of the Royal Air Force. No. 35 Squadron was formed on 1 February 1916
No. 192 Squadron RAF (511 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 192 Squadron was a Royal Air Force squadron operational during the First World War as a night training squadron and during the Second World War as
No. 136 Squadron RAF (870 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 136 Squadron RAF was a short-lived RAF unit that saw no action in World War I, but upon reformation became the highest scoring unit in South East Asia
No. 102 Squadron RAF (997 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 102 Squadron was a Royal Air Force night bomber squadron in the First World War and a heavy bomber squadron in the Second World War. After the war
1917 Birthday Honours (25,681 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Brigadier-General) John Maitland Salmond, DSO, Royal Lancaster Regiment and Royal Flying Corps. Lieutenant-Colonel (temporary Colonel) Frank Beauchamp Macaulay Chatterton
Penshurst Airfield (3,152 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Penshurst Airfield was an airfield in operation between 1916–36 and 1940–46. Initially a military airfield, after the First World War it was used as an
No. 27 Squadron RAF (1,866 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 27 Squadron of the Royal Air Force operates the Boeing Chinook from RAF Odiham. 27 Squadron formed at Hounslow Heath Aerodrome on 5 November 1915 (1915-11-05)
Jimmy Jewell (224 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jimmy Jewell (1898 - 1952) born Arthur James Jewell and also known as AJ Jewell was an English association football manager and referee who during his
No. 4 Squadron RAAF (2,433 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 4 Squadron is a Royal Australian Air Force squadron composed of the air force special forces Combat Controllers, aircrew who operate the Pilatus PC-21
No. 3 Squadron RAAF (2,443 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. 3 Squadron is a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) fighter squadron, headquartered at RAAF Base Williamtown, near Newcastle, New South Wales. Established
Arthur Whitten Brown (937 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Regiment. After service in France, Brown was seconded to 2 Squadron Royal Flying Corps as an observer. Brown's aircraft was shot down by anti-aircraft fire
Charles Galton Darwin (971 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Charles Galton Darwin KBE MC FRS (18 December 1887 – 31 December 1962) was an English physicist who served as director of the National Physical Laboratory
No. 71 Squadron RAF (939 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
aircraft squadron. The number has been used three times: once by the Royal Flying Corps for an Australian Flying Corps squadron; in the Second World War as
Charles Steele (227 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
commissioned into the Green Howards in 1916. He transferred into the Royal Flying Corps and became a flying ace credited with seven aerial victories. He transferred
Gerald Gibbs (RAF officer) (95 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Air Marshal Sir Gerald Ernest Gibbs KBE, CIE, MC & Two Bars (3 September 1896 – 13 October 1992) was a senior commander in the Royal Air Force in the first
Reginald Denny (actor) (2,136 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Reginald Leigh Dugmore (20 November 1891 – 16 June 1967), better known as Reginald Denny, achieved success both as an English stage, film and television
List of World War I aces from South Africa (250 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
air victories. During the war South African pilots served with the Royal Flying Corps (RFC), the South African Aviation Corps (SAAC) where they were engaged
Gerald Birks (962 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
credited with twelve aerial victories while serving in the British Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force. He was one of seven children (four sons and three
1916 Birthday Honours (27,903 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Royal Field Artillery Sgt. S. Bull, Royal Flying Corps Flight Sgt. (Acting Sgt-Maj.) H. C. S. Bullock, Royal Flying Corps Cpl. H. T. Bunn, Middlesex Regiment
Lawson Wood (753 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lawson Wood, sometimes Clarence Lawson Wood RI FZS, (23 August 1878 – 26 October 1957), was an English painter, illustrator and designer. Lawson Wood was
Henry Eric Dolan (360 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1916. On 31 August 1917 he was appointed a flying officer in the Royal Flying Corps, and transferred to the General List. In early 1918 he was posted
RAF North Coates (1,632 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was converted into a forward landing ground for aircraft from the Royal Flying Corps' No. 33 (Home Defence) Squadron, based at Brattleby, and tasked with
Henry John Burden (239 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Canadian Forestry Company in France in mid 1916. He transferred to the Royal Flying Corps in April 1917 for flight training. Qualifying as a pilot, he flew
Ernest Lindup (153 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lieutenant Ernest Lindup MC was a South African World War I flying ace credited with five aerial victories. Lindup scored five victories between 4 February
Robert Blucke (300 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Air Vice Marshal Robert Stewart Blucke, CB, CBE, DSO, AFC & Bar (22 June 1897 – 2 October 1988) was a Royal Air Force officer who became Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief
Arthur Ernest Newland (335 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sergeant Arthur Ernest Newland DFM & Bar (1882–1964) was a British World War I observer ace credited with 22 victories. Newland was born about 1882 to
Norman Macmillan (RAF officer) (1,525 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
spending 16½ months in the trenches. He then transferred to the Royal Flying Corps, being commissioned as a temporary second lieutenant (on probation)
Harold Blackburn (1,065 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Leeds. Upon the outbreak of World War I Harold Blackburn joined the Royal Flying Corps, receiving his Certificate 'B’ (no. 214) from the Central Flying School
No. 6 Squadron RAAF (4,084 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
unit was initially designated No. 30 (Australian Training) Squadron, Royal Flying Corps and its role was to train fighter pilots for service with No. 2 Squadron
Richard Hill (RAF officer) (449 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Easter 1917, about the time of his 18th birthday, and joined the Royal Flying Corps. From cadet he was commissioned as a temporary second lieutenant (on
Paul Maltby (490 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Air Vice Marshal Sir Paul Copeland Maltby, KCVO, KBE, CB, DSO, AFC, DL (5 August 1892 – 2 July 1971) was a senior Royal Air Force officer who later served
T. Neville Stack (632 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Royal Air Force. Thomas Neville Stack left the Army to join the Royal Flying Corps in 1917, at the end of the war he became a flying instructor. In 1921
Francis Cubbon (1,013 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ball's death on 7 May, Cubbon became the second ranking ace of the Royal Flying Corps. On 9 June, two days after scoring their final victory together, Cubbon