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searching for Rabotnitsa 8 found (23 total)

alternate case: rabotnitsa

Vera Kuznetsova (41 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

Woman on the Train 1972 Izhorskiy batalon Aunt Dasha 1973 Mechenyy atom Rabotnitsa pochty 1973 Yulka Yulka's Grandma 1973 Stepmom Yekaterina Alekseevna 1973
Old Bolshevik (1,458 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Klavdiya Nikolayeva (1893–1944) — joined bolsheviks in 1909, editor of Rabotnitsa, who rallied woman against capitalism. Ivan Belostotsky (1882–1968) —
Alexander F. Sklyar (602 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sidorovich, a physicist, and his journalist wife Irina Viktorovna, a one time Rabotnitsa magazine second editor. In 1985 Sklyar graduated from the prestigious
Dr. Haass Social Assistance Fund (1,887 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"Izvestiya", February 9, 1988 "Hasten to do good things!". – Journal "Rabotnitsa", № 3,1989 "Dr Haass Social Assistance Fund". – Newspaper "Nedelya", № 49
Vladimir Yakovlev (journalist) (1,382 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
the Newspaper Soviet Russia. He then went on to work in the Magazine Rabotnitsa, the Sobesednik Weekly. Up to 1988 Yakovlev was a correspondent of Ogoniok
Janusz Korczak Institute (921 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ADAPEI AM, France, and others. "Hasten to do good!". – The magazine "Rabotnitsa", № 3 of 1989 – https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1uofP2NAJxpZ21ZaC1VWmkzN0k/view
Alexandra Kollontai (6,469 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
as a speaker, leaflet writer and worker on the Bolshevik women's paper Rabotnitsa". Following the July uprising against the Provisional Government, she
The Stone Flower (3,853 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Na Smenu! from 14 to 26 January 1939, in Oktyabr (issues 5–6), and in Rabotnitsa magazine (issues 18–19). In 1944 the story was translated from Russian