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Longer titles found: Prologue (Prose Edda) (view)

searching for Prose Edda 29 found (480 total)

alternate case: prose Edda

Asgard (221 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, in the Prose Edda (written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson), and in euhemerized
Sword of Freyr (283 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
gives it. The loss of Freyr's sword has consequences. According to the Prose Edda, Freyr had to fight Beli without his sword and slew him with an antler
Wecta (131 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and his son Edwin of Northumbria. Wecta appears in the Prologue to the Prose Edda as Vegdeg, one of Woden's sons, a mighty king who ruled East Saxony. Although
Poetic diction (1,995 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
wrote the Prose Edda, a.k.a. the Younger Edda around 1200 A.D., partially to explain the older Edda and poetic diction. Half of the Prose Edda, the Skáldskaparmál
Thula (poetic genre) (614 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Old Norse examples are found in various passages of the poetic and the prose Edda (esp. Skáldskaparmál with the Nafnaþulur, Grímnismál, Alvíssmál), the
Anglo-Saxon royal genealogies (5,431 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and was used by Snorri Sturluson for his 13th century Prologue to the Prose Edda. The majority of the surviving pedigrees trace the families of Anglo-Saxon
Edda Művek (1,304 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
for Edda Művek shortly thereafter. The name "Edda" was inspired by the Prose Edda of Norse Mythology while the word, "Művek" (works), is a symbolic reference
Deutsche Mythologie (1,074 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Germanic religious experience, from the creation narratives of the Prose Edda to the superstitions of the German peasant'. Grimm was not given to overt
Sigar (356 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
became the king of Denmark. CyberSamurai Encyclopedia of Norse Mythology: Prose Edda - Skáldskaparmál (English) Archived 2006-10-06 at the Wayback Machine
Keres (1,128 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Valkyries". Studia Celtica Fennica. 5: 5–25. Byock, Jesse (2005). The Prose Edda. Penguin Books Limited. pp. 142–143. ISBN 978-0-14-191274-5. Lidell.Scott:
Stora Hammars stones (588 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 72–73. ISBN 0-415-04936-9. CyberSamurai Encyclopedia of Norse Mythology: Prose Edda - Skáldskaparmál Archived 2008-02-19 at the Wayback Machine (English)
Vetrliði Sumarliðason (224 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Douglas. Brodeur, Arthur Gilchrist (trans.). 1916. Snorri Sturluson: The Prose Edda. New York: The American-Scandinavian Foundation. Vetrliði's lausavísa
Viking Age arms and armour (4,963 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
weaponry, axes were often given names. According to Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda, axes were often named after she-trolls. The Viking age sling was without
Gutasaga (899 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Gutnish: Tjelvar). He was a mythical figure who shows up twice in the Prose Edda and once in Gutasaga. Gotland is under a spell and under water during
Þorbjörn dísarskáld (331 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
255. Brodeur, Arthur Gilchrist (trans.). 1916. Snorri Sturluson: The Prose Edda. New York: The American-Scandinavian Foundation. Faulkes, Anthony (trans
The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún (6,181 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
OCLC 310224953. Tolkien, J. R. R.; Tolkien, Christopher (2009). "The Prose Edda of Snorri Sturluson". The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún. New York: Houghton
Ursula Dronke (1,027 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1997-98. ISBN 978-0-9532697-0-9 (with Peter Dronke). "The Prologue of the Prose Edda: Explorations of a Latin Background". Sjötíu ritgerðir helgaðar Jakobi
Culture of Iceland (2,418 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Icelandic historical writing; Snorri Sturluson, author of the famous Prose Edda, a collection of Norse myths; and Hallgrímur Pétursson, author of Iceland's
Culhwch and Olwen (1,297 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
'the hand in the wolf's mouth' is one of the most famous parts of the Prose Edda, told of Fenris Wolf and the god Tyr; Huan recalls several faithful hounds
Nodens (1,871 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
along the seacoast, as well as seamanship, sailing and fishing, whom the prose Edda also associates with the power to calm the sea or fire. Perhaps inspired
Beren and Lúthien (2,976 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
'the hand in the wolf's mouth' is one of the most famous parts of the Prose Edda, told of Fenris Wolf and the god Tyr; Huan recalls several faithful hounds
List of magical weapons (4,241 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The weapon the fire giant Surtr wields in the battle of Ragnarok. The Prose Edda calls it a flaming sword, although in the Poetic Edda merely it is described
Mabinogion (4,472 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
'the hand in the wolf's mouth' is one of the most famous parts of the Prose Edda, told of Fenris Wolf and the god Tyr; Huan recalls several faithful hounds
Hylestad Stave Church (1,099 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Publishing. pp. 251–56. ISBN 978-1-907256-42-4. Sturluson, Snorri (2005). The Prose Edda. Penguin Classics. pp. 97-98. Byock, Jesse L. (trans.) (1990). The Saga
William Blake (12,083 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
his other essential sources, Ovid's Metamorphosis, for instance, or the Prose Edda, and how he related their symbolism to his own."; Fry, Northrop. "Fearful
Battle of Finnsburg (3,579 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Notes on Beowulf Sturluson, Snorri (2005), Jesse L. Byock (ed.), The Prose Edda, Penguin Suzuki, Seiichi (2000), The Quoit Brooch Style and Anglo-Saxon
End time (8,943 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Poems. Dover Publications. ISBN 0-486-43710-8. Byock, Jesse (2005). The Prose Edda. Penguin Classics. ISBN 0-14-044755-5. Buck, Christopher (2004). "The
Proto-Indo-European mythology (8,833 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
indienne, Paris, Les Belles Lettres, 2008 Sturluson, Snorri (2006), The Prose Edda, translated by Byock, Jesse, Penguin Classics, p. 164, ISBN 978-0-14-044755-2
Creation of man from clay (816 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The American-Scandinavian Foundation. Byock, Jesse (Trans.) (2006). The Prose Edda. Penguin Classics. ISBN 0-14-044755-5 Davidson, H. R. Ellis (1975). Scandinavian