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searching for Proclus (mosaicist) 193 found (730 total)

alternate case: proclus (mosaicist)

Proclus (4,467 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

article is about Proclus Diadochus, the Neoplatonist philosopher. For other uses, see Proclus (disambiguation)
Proclus of Constantinople (1,403 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Proclus (died July 446 or 447) was an Archbishop of Constantinople. He is venerated as a saint
Proclus (Montanist) (81 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Proclus, Proklos (Greek: Πρόκλος), or Proculus is the name of a follower of Montanus in antiquity. He
Proclus Oneirocrites (151 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
with a good introductory style. (October 2009) Proclus or Proklos (Greek: Πρόκλος) was surnamed Oneirocrites
Parallel postulate (2,730 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
original line, then it also intersects the other. (Proclus' axiom)[6] However, the alternatives which employ
St. Proclus (Michelangelo) (472 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
removed. (December 2009) The statue of St. Proclus (1494–1495) was created by Michelangelo out of
Proclus (crater) (668 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Colongitude 314° at sunrise Eponym Proclus Diadochus Proclus is a young lunar impact crater
Eutychius Proclus (372 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eutychius Proclus (Ancient Greek: Εὐτύχιος Πρόκλος, Eutychios Proklos) was a grammarian who flourished
Proclus Mallotes (111 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
probably this Proclus who is mentioned by Proclus Diadochus.[2] Notes ^ Suda, Proklos π2470 ^ Proclus, in Timaeus
Lepidochrysops plebeja (196 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
plebeja Butler, 1898 Neochrysops plebeia Neochrysops proclus Hulstaert, 1924 The Twin-spot Blue (Lepidochrysops
Proclus of Naucratis (247 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Find links tool for suggestions. (February 2009) Proclus or Proklos (Greek: Πρόκλος) was a teacher of rhetoric
Proclus of Rhegium (213 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Proclus or Proklos (Greek: Πρόκλος; 1st century), probably a native of Rhegium, was a physician among
Larginus Proclus (192 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
tool for suggestions. (February 2009) Larginus Proclus lived in the 1st century in Germany. He predicted
Proculus (prefect of Constantinople) (380 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Proculus (died in Constantinople, November 16, 393) or Proklos (Greek: Πρόκλος) was Eparch of Constantinople
Neoplatonism (8,136 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
or theurgy, literally, 'divine-working'. Proclus Proclus Lycaeus (February 8, 412 – April 17, 485),
Thomas Taylor (neoplatonist) (1,058 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sallustius, On the Gods and the World. Proclus The Six Books of Proclus, the Platonic Successor, on the Theology
Isosceles triangle theorem (1,074 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
difficult test. Proofs Euclid and Proclus Euclid's statement of the theorem includes a second
Kenneth Sylvan Guthrie (1,373 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ever since. The works of Proclus Guthrie was involved in 'resurrecting' Proclus. This he did by translating
Hegias (361 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
studied under Proclus at the school in Athens, when Proclus was an old man c. 480. Proclus showed him great
Carpus of Antioch (332 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
by a double motion.[4] Notes ^ Proclus, on Euclid, 241-243 ^ Proclus, on Euclid, 125-126 ^ Pappus, Collection
Zenodotus (philosopher) (150 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(paidika) of Proclus."[1] Zenodotus served under Marinus of Neapolis when Marinus succeeded Proclus as the
Domninus of Larissa (639 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
academy eventually choose Proclus' interpretation over Domninus' and Proclus would later became the head
Marinus of Neapolis (737 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Proclus in Athens. His surviving works are an introduction to Euclid's Data; a Life of Proclus; and
Isidore of Alexandria (649 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
followed Proclus. Life Isidore was born in Alexandria. In Athens, he studied under Proclus, and learned
Origen the Pagan (329 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
disliked.[2] He is also mentioned several times by Proclus, and it is clear that Origen's fellow students
Asclepigenia (307 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
life is known from an account in Marinus' Life of Proclus. Her father, Plutarch of Athens was head of the
Euclid (2,635 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
after he lived, by Proclus ca. 450 AD and Pappus of Alexandria ca. 320 AD.[6] Proclus introduces Euclid
Hermias (philosopher) (327 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and who had originally been betrothed to Proclus, but Proclus broke the engagement off after receiving
Syrianus (955 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
is important as the teacher of Proclus, and, like Plutarch and Proclus, as a commentator on Plato and
Lesches (237 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
x. 26. 4 and .8 and x. 27. 1. ^ Proclus. Chrestomathy, ii. ^ Proclus. Chrestomathy, ii. ^ Aristotle.
Aedesia (298 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
all the philosophers there, and especially by Proclus, to whom she had been betrothed by Syrianus, when
Timeline of Ancient Greek mathematicians (156 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pappus Perseus Philolaus Philon Porphyry Posidonius Proclus Ptolemy Pythagoras Serenus Simplicius Sosigenes
Epic Cycle (2,065 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
written by someone named Proclus (not the same person as the philosopher Proclus Diadochus). The epics were
Agapius (philosopher) (162 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Marinus of Neapolis was scholarch after the death of Proclus (c. 485).[1] He was admired for his love of learning
Philip of Opus (818 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
that he demonstrated the figure of the Moon), Proclus,[9] and Alexander of Aphrodisias. His astronomical
Olympiodorus the Elder (238 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
being the teacher of the important Neoplatonist Proclus, (410-485) whom Olympiodorus wanted his own daughter
Ctesibius (597 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
under kings who loved fame and supported the arts. Proclus (the commentator on Euclid) and Hero of Alexandria
Perseus (geometer) (373 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Perseus' life are known, as he is mentioned only by Proclus and Geminus; none of his own works have survived
Quadrivium (782 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
until Boethius early in the sixth century.[6] As Proclus wrote: The Pythagoreans considered all mathematical
Asclepiodotus of Alexandria (467 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
philosophy School Neoplatonism Influenced by Plato, Proclus Influenced Damascius Asclepiodotus (Greek:
Neith (1,299 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Check |isbn= value (help).  ^ Proclus (1820). The Commentaries of Proclus on the Timaeus of Plato, in Five
Zeno of Elea (1,353 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
OCLC 222336129.  Proclus; Morrow, Glenn R.; Dillon, John M. (1992) [1987]. Proclus' Commentary on Plato's
Hegesinus of Pergamon (212 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asclepigenia Hierocles Syrianus Hermias Aedesia Proclus Ammonius Hermiae Asclepiodotus Marinus Zenodotus
Ammonius Hermiae (984 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
philosophers Hermias and Aedesia. He was a pupil of Proclus in Athens, and taught at Alexandria for most of
Iamblichus (2,449 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Neopythagoreanism, Aristotle, Plato Influenced Proclus, Aedesius Iamblichus, also known as Iamblichus
Menaechmus (1,207 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dinostratus, is known solely from the writings of Proclus. Proclus also mentions that Menaechmus was taught by
Ray system (620 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asymmetrical ray system about the lunar crater Proclus (Apollo 15 image). The physical nature of lunar
Ray system (620 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asymmetrical ray system about the lunar crater Proclus (Apollo 15 image). The physical nature of lunar
Angel (Michelangelo) (445 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna. See also Basilica of San Domenico St. Proclus (Michelangelo) St. Petronius (Michelangelo)
Eusebius of Myndus (235 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asclepigenia Hierocles Syrianus Hermias Aedesia Proclus Ammonius Hermiae Asclepiodotus Marinus Zenodotus
Liber de Causis (416 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
mystery, but most of the content is taken from Proclus' Elements of Theology. This was first noticed by
Zeno of Sidon (631 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Laërtius, vii. 35 ^ PHerc. 1471 ^ PHerc. 182 ^ Proclus, ad I. Euclid, iii. v t e Epicureanism Philosophers
Menedemus of Pyrrha (206 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asclepigenia Hierocles Syrianus Hermias Aedesia Proclus Ammonius Hermiae Asclepiodotus Marinus Zenodotus
Nicoteles of Cyrene (325 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pappus Perseus Philolaus Philon Porphyry Posidonius Proclus Ptolemy Pythagoras Serenus Simplicius Sosigenes
Argonautica Orphica (241 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
other hymns such as the Homeric Hymns and those of Proclus and Callimachus. Another related work is the Lithica
Diocles (mathematician) (561 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
doubling the cube. The curve was alluded to by Proclus in his commentary on Euclid and attributed to Diocles
Sallustius (568 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
translated from the Greek; and five hymns by Proclus, in the original Greek, with a poetical version
Caius (presbyter) (419 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
fragments from Caius' "Dialogue or Disputation Against Proclus," we are indebted to Eusebius, who included them
Platonic Academy (3,114 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Neoplatonist teaching in Athens are uncertain, but when Proclus arrived in Athens in the early 430s, he found Plutarch
Telecles (287 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asclepigenia Hierocles Syrianus Hermias Aedesia Proclus Ammonius Hermiae Asclepiodotus Marinus Zenodotus
Trapezoid (1,779 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(τραπέζοειδη, trapézoeide, "table-like") was by Marinus Proclus (412 to 485 AD) in his Commentary on the first
Heliodorus of Alexandria (148 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aedesia took them to Athens where they studied under Proclus. Eventually they returned to Alexandria, where
Charmadas (285 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asclepigenia Hierocles Syrianus Hermias Aedesia Proclus Ammonius Hermiae Asclepiodotus Marinus Zenodotus
Chrysanthius (302 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asclepigenia Hierocles Syrianus Hermias Aedesia Proclus Ammonius Hermiae Asclepiodotus Marinus Zenodotus
Priscian of Lydia (567 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Iamblichus' On the Soul and the works of Plotinus and Proclus. The list is a catalog of Neoplatonic works on
Scholia (641 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Macrobius (c. 400 AD) on Cicero's Dream of Scipio Proclus (c. 440 AD) on Plato's Parmenides and Timaeus and
Plutarch of Athens (668 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
who succeeded him as head of the school, and Proclus. Philosophy Plutarch's main principle was that
Geminus (926 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
has not survived, many extracts are preserved by Proclus, Eutocius, and others. He divided mathematics into
Patriarch John VIII of Constantinople (647 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Marcus I of Byzantium (599 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Plutarch of Byzantium (618 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Atticus (philosopher) (360 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asclepigenia Hierocles Syrianus Hermias Aedesia Proclus Ammonius Hermiae Asclepiodotus Marinus Zenodotus
Patriarch John XII of Constantinople (632 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Philadelphus of Byzantium (594 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Aristaeus the Elder (355 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pappus Perseus Philolaus Philon Porphyry Posidonius Proclus Ptolemy Pythagoras Serenus Simplicius Sosigenes
Arctinus of Miletus (343 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Chrestomathy ascribed (probably wrongly) to Proclus the Neo-Platonist of the 5th century AD. The Aethiopis
Theurgy (1,603 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
henosis, and perfecting oneself. Definitions Proclus (c. 480): theurgy is "a power higher than all human
Menelaus of Alexandria (707 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Alexandria by both Pappus of Alexandria and Proclus, and a conversation of his with Lucius, held in
Equatorium (370 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
It was not a clockwork mechanism. References ^ Proclus (1909). Hypotyposis Astronomicarum Positionum.
Timaeus of Locri (235 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
where he is described as an intimate of Plato Proclus, in his Commentary on Plato's Timaeus (II, 38,
Crates of Athens (378 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asclepigenia Hierocles Syrianus Hermias Aedesia Proclus Ammonius Hermiae Asclepiodotus Marinus Zenodotus
Lemniscate (782 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
with a figure eight shape can be traced back to Proclus, a Greek Neoplatonist philosopher and mathematician
Ioane Petritsi (574 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Georgia, best known for his translations of Proclus, along with an extensive commentary. In later sources
Olympiodorus the Younger (851 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
most well known for being among the students of Proclus. Writings Among the extant writings of Olympiodorus
Dexippus (philosopher) (353 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asclepigenia Hierocles Syrianus Hermias Aedesia Proclus Ammonius Hermiae Asclepiodotus Marinus Zenodotus
Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite (5,685 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
theology Influenced by Plotinus, Iamblichus, Proclus, Origen, Gregory of Nyssa, Basil of Caesarea
Neoplatonism and Christianity (1,768 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Athens Macrobius St. Augustine of Hippo Syrianus Proclus Pseudo-Dionysius Damascius Simplicius of Cilicia
Trojan War (12,132 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
by H.G. Evelyn-White, 1914 (public domain). Proclus, Proclus' Summary of the Epic Cycle, trans. Gregory
Evander (philosopher) (383 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asclepigenia Hierocles Syrianus Hermias Aedesia Proclus Ammonius Hermiae Asclepiodotus Marinus Zenodotus
Abstraction (mathematics) (606 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
documentation of the axioms of plane geometry—though Proclus tells of an earlier axiomatisation by Hippocrates
Sporus of Nicaea (391 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pappus Perseus Philolaus Philon Porphyry Posidonius Proclus Ptolemy Pythagoras Serenus Simplicius Sosigenes
Patriarch Leo of Constantinople (648 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Athanasius II of Constantinople (611 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Theodorus of Asine (138 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
one of the most eminent of the Neoplatonists. Proclus repeatedly mentions him in his commentaries on
Alypius of Byzantium (655 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Nilus of Constantinople (635 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Polycarpus II of Byzantium (631 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Ecumenical Patriarch Clement of Constantinople (578 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Iliupersis (763 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
unknown "Proclus" (possibly to be identified with the 2nd century CE grammarian Eutychius Proclus). A few
Greek mathematics (2,209 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
comes from traditions recorded in works such as Proclus’ commentary on Euclid written centuries later.
Eutocius of Ascalon (436 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pappus Perseus Philolaus Philon Porphyry Posidonius Proclus Ptolemy Pythagoras Serenus Simplicius Sosigenes
Platonism (3,263 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Athens Macrobius St. Augustine of Hippo Syrianus Proclus Pseudo-Dionysius Damascius Simplicius of Cilicia
Sopater of Apamea (371 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asclepigenia Hierocles Syrianus Hermias Aedesia Proclus Ammonius Hermiae Asclepiodotus Marinus Zenodotus
André-Jean Festugière (91 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
on Neoplatonism, and in particular the works of Proclus. He is also notable for his translation of the
Euzois of Byzantium (595 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Theodosius I of Constantinople (635 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch George I of Constantinople (621 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Euclid's Elements (4,686 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
comes from the plural of 'element'. According to Proclus the term was used to describe a theorem that is
Polycarpus I of Byzantium (655 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Albinus (philosopher) (385 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asclepigenia Hierocles Syrianus Hermias Aedesia Proclus Ammonius Hermiae Asclepiodotus Marinus Zenodotus
Laurence of Byzantium (596 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Orion of Thebes (154 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
5th-century grammarian of Thebes (Egypt), the teacher of Proclus the neo-Platonist, and of Eudocia, the wife of
Theodosius of Bithynia (541 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pappus Perseus Philolaus Philon Porphyry Posidonius Proclus Ptolemy Pythagoras Serenus Simplicius Sosigenes
Telegony (1,615 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
primarily on a summary of the Telegonus myth in Proclus'[4] Chrestomathy. The poem opens after the events
Patriarch Antony III of Constantinople (636 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Little Iliad (1,002 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
unknown "Proclus" (possibly to be identified with the 2nd-century CE grammarian Eutychius Proclus). Numerous
Patriarch John V of Constantinople (620 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Constantine I of Constantinople (620 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch John XIII of Constantinople (582 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Sergius II of Constantinople (640 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Nicetas I of Constantinople (637 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Dometius of Byzantium (610 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Metrodorus (grammarian) (449 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pappus Perseus Philolaus Philon Porphyry Posidonius Proclus Ptolemy Pythagoras Serenus Simplicius Sosigenes
Patriarch Cyril III of Constantinople (590 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Manuel II of Constantinople (613 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
The Conversion of Saul (Michelangelo) (542 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Additions to the Ark of St Dominic (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid
Eleutherius of Byzantium (609 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Cyriacus I of Byzantium (580 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Eudemus of Rhodes (1,323 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ἱστορία) is mentioned by many more writers, including Proclus, Simplicius, and Pappus of Alexandria. From them
November 20 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics) (92 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saints St. Gregory Decapolites (816) Archbishop Proclus of Constantinople (c. 447) Ecgbert (archbishop
Archbishop Sisinnius I of Constantinople (626 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Alcinous (philosopher) (896 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"The Virtues and 'Becoming Like God': Alcinous to Proclus", in Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Volume
Cyzicus (1,522 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eunomius of Cyzicus; Saint Dalmatius; bishops Proclus and Germanus, who became Patriarchs of Constantinople;
Praxiphanes (265 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cf. Clement of Alexandria, i.; Strabo, xiv. ^ Proclus, i. in Timaeum; John Tzetzes, ad Hesiod. Op. et
Patriarch Thomas I of Constantinople (629 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Joannicius III of Constantinople (941 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Peter of Constantinople (633 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Leo the Mathematician (1,224 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Plato, Paul of Alexandria, Theon of Alexandria, Proclus, Porphyry, Apollonius of Perga, the lost Mechanics
Felix of Byzantium (621 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Diogenes of Byzantium (617 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Gerasimus I of Constantinople (638 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Antoninus (philosopher) (345 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asclepigenia Hierocles Syrianus Hermias Aedesia Proclus Ammonius Hermiae Asclepiodotus Marinus Zenodotus
Arithmetica (595 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pappus Perseus Philolaus Philon Porphyry Posidonius Proclus Ptolemy Pythagoras Serenus Simplicius Sosigenes
Sedecion of Byzantium (609 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Cyril III of Constantinople (590 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Dawn (Michelangelo) (453 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Additions to the Ark of St Dominic (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid
Sosigenes of Alexandria (651 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pappus Perseus Philolaus Philon Porphyry Posidonius Proclus Ptolemy Pythagoras Serenus Simplicius Sosigenes
Illustrius Pusaeus (193 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pusaeus was a pupil of the Neoplatonist philosopher Proclus, at his school in Alexandria; other noteworthy
William of Moerbeke (885 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
his translation of the Theological Elements of Proclus (made in 1268), because the Theological Elements
Theodotos I of Constantinople (803 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
John M. Dillon (551 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Morrow, G. R.; Dillon, J. M., eds. (1992) [1987], Proclus' Commentary on Plato's Parmenides (translation
Numenius of Apamea (1,698 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Philo and his theory of the Logos). According to Proclus,[12] Numenius held that there was a kind of trinity
Patriarch Constantine II of Constantinople (790 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Michael II of Constantinople (848 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Cypria (1,767 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
unknown "Proclus" (possibly to be identified with the 2nd-century CE grammarian Eutychius Proclus, or else
Aethiopis (713 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
unknown "Proclus" (possibly to be identified with the 2nd-century AD grammarian Eutychius Proclus). Fewer
Brutus (Michelangelo) (481 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Additions to the Ark of St Dominic (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid
Eternity of the world (944 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Neo-Platonists The Neoplatonist philosopher Proclus (412 – 485 AD) advanced in his De Aeternitate Mundi
1533 in science (303 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
including integral diagrams and the first printing of Proclus' commentary on the first book. Gemma Frisius publishes
Berthold of Moosburg (174 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
major statement of the importance for Platonism of Proclus.[4] He opposed his Christian-Platonic synthesis
Doubling the cube (961 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pappus Perseus Philolaus Philon Porphyry Posidonius Proclus Ptolemy Pythagoras Serenus Simplicius Sosigenes
Pyrrhic (357 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
an identically named Ancient Greek war dance. Proclus thought it was the same as the hyporcheme (huporchēma)
Patriarch Raphael II of Constantinople (756 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Theaetetus (mathematician) (592 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pappus Perseus Philolaus Philon Porphyry Posidonius Proclus Ptolemy Pythagoras Serenus Simplicius Sosigenes
Patriarch Gregory VII of Constantinople (751 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Paul IV of Constantinople (712 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Thales (10,117 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the primacy of Thales comes to us from a book by Proclus who wrote a thousand years after Thales but is
Patriarch Germanus IV of Constantinople (859 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Neophytus V of Constantinople (711 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Simplicius of Cilicia (3,057 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of the Platonist school, which in the time of Proclus was valued at more than 1000 gold pieces,[7] was
Patriarch Sophronius III of Constantinople (1,242 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Giorgio de Santillana (393 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Origins of Scientific Thought: from Anaximander to Proclus, 600 BC to 300 AD. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson
Patriarch Meletius I Pegas (1,276 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Maximus of Tyre (527 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asclepigenia Hierocles Syrianus Hermias Aedesia Proclus Ammonius Hermiae Asclepiodotus Marinus Zenodotus
Nicomedes (mathematician) (553 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pappus Perseus Philolaus Philon Porphyry Posidonius Proclus Ptolemy Pythagoras Serenus Simplicius Sosigenes
Atlantis (7,947 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a commentary on Plato's Timaeus, is lost, but Proclus, a Neoplatonist of the 5th century AD, reports
Dionysodorus (521 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pappus Perseus Philolaus Philon Porphyry Posidonius Proclus Ptolemy Pythagoras Serenus Simplicius Sosigenes
Bion of Abdera (478 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pappus Perseus Philolaus Philon Porphyry Posidonius Proclus Ptolemy Pythagoras Serenus Simplicius Sosigenes
Night (Michelangelo) (551 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Additions to the Ark of St Dominic (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid
Patriarch Polyeuctus of Constantinople (1,020 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Ancient commentators project (1,148 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Philoponus Against Proclus on the Eternity of the World 1-5 M. Share 2005 Philoponus Against Proclus on the Eternity
Patriarch Constantine V of Constantinople (753 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Zenodorus (mathematician) (476 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pappus Perseus Philolaus Philon Porphyry Posidonius Proclus Ptolemy Pythagoras Serenus Simplicius Sosigenes
Patriarch Cyril VII of Constantinople (712 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Young Slave (557 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Additions to the Ark of St Dominic (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid
John X of Constantinople (904 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Matthew II of Constantinople (830 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Stephen I of Constantinople (800 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Hierocles of Alexandria (590 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asclepigenia Hierocles Syrianus Hermias Aedesia Proclus Ammonius Hermiae Asclepiodotus Marinus Zenodotus
Patriarch Anthimus IV of Constantinople (884 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Right angle (735 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
measure other angles with. Euclid's commentator Proclus gave a proof of this postulate using the previous
Patriarch Gabriel II of Constantinople (939 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine
Patriarch Timothy II of Constantinople (997 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of ConstantinopleByzantine