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searching for Proclus (mosaicist) 193 found (642 total)

alternate case: proclus (mosaicist)

Proclus of Constantinople (812 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Proclus (died July 446 or 447) was an Archbishop of Constantinople. He is venerated as a saint in the Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church
Proclus (4,023 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article is about Proclus Diadochus, the Neoplatonist philosopher. For other uses, see Proclus (disambiguation). Proclus Lycaeus (/ˈprɒkləs ˌlaɪˈsiːəs/;
St. Proclus (Michelangelo) (40 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The statue of St. Proclus (1494–1495) was created by Michelangelo out of marble. Its height is 58.5 cm. It is situated in the Basilica of San Domenico
Marinus of Neapolis (412 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Palestine. He was a student of Proclus in Athens. His surviving works are an introduction to Euclid's Data; a Life of Proclus; and two astronomical texts
Lepidochrysops plebeja (120 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Limpopo Province, North West Province and North Cape) Lepidochrysops plebeja proclus (Hulstaert, 1924) Lepidochrysops, Site of Markku Savela Woodhall, S
Hegias (246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Academy in Athens. Hegias studied under Proclus at the school in Athens, when Proclus was an old man c. 480. Proclus showed him great favour, and considered
Proclus Mallotes (108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Proclus or Proklos Mallotes (Greek: Πρόκλος Μαλλώτης) was a Stoic philosopher and a native of Mallus in Cilicia. According to the Suda he was the author
Proclus (crater) (500 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Proclus is a young lunar impact crater located to the west of the Mare Crisium, on the east shore of the Palus Somni. It lies to the south of the prominent
Carpus of Antioch (171 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and the 2nd century AD. He wrote on mechanics, astronomy, and geometry. Proclus quotes from an Astronomical Treatise by Carpus concerning whether problems
Eutychius Proclus (345 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eutychius Proclus (Ancient Greek: Εὐτύχιος Πρόκλος, Eutychios Proklos) was a grammarian who flourished in the 2nd century CE. He was born at Sicca in
Proclus (Montanist) (82 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Proclus, Proklos (Greek: Πρόκλος), or Proculus is the name of a follower of Montanus in antiquity. He probably lived in the 2nd century. The sect called
Maximus the Confessor (2,845 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
commentators on Aristotle and Plato, like Plotinus, Porphyry, Iamblichus, and Proclus. When one of his friends began espousing the Christological position known
Syrianus (750 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Athens in 431/432. He is important as the teacher of Proclus, and, like Plutarch and Proclus, as a commentator on Plato and Aristotle. His best-known
Asclepigenia (132 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
philosopher and mystic whose life is known from an account in Marinus' Life of Proclus. Her father, Plutarch of Athens was head of the Neoplatonist school at
Domninus of Larissa (442 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hellenistico-Syrian mathematician. Domninus of Larissa, Syria was, simultaneously with Proclus, a pupil of Syrianus. Domninus is said to have corrupted the doctrines
Zenodotus (philosopher) (166 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
described as "the darling (paidika) of Proclus." Zenodotus served under Marinus of Neapolis when Marinus succeeded Proclus as the head (scholarch) of the school
Proclus Oneirocrites (126 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Proclus or Proklos (Greek: Πρόκλος) was surnamed Oneirocrites (Ὀνειροκρίτης, "judge of dreams"), according to some authorities. He predicted the death
Thomas Taylor (neoplatonist) (2,955 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
publishing his various translations, which besides Plato and Aristotle, include Proclus, Porphyry, Apuleius, Ocellus Lucanus and other Neoplatonists and Pythagoreans
Parallel postulate (2,691 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
are coplanar with the original line, then it also intersects the other. (Proclus' axiom) However, the alternatives which employ the word "parallel" cease
Isidore of Alexandria (517 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
succession to Marinus, who followed Proclus. Isidore was born in Alexandria. In Athens, he studied under Proclus, and learned the doctrine of Aristotle
Epic Cycle (1,680 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
is a detailed summary written by someone named Proclus (not the same person as the philosopher Proclus Diadochus). The epics were composed in dactylic
Hermias (philosopher) (185 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a relative of Syrianus, and who had originally been betrothed to Proclus, but Proclus broke the engagement off after receiving a divine warning. Hermias
Proclus of Rhegium (185 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Proclus or Proklos (Greek: Πρόκλος; 1st century), probably a native of Rhegium, was a physician among the Bruttii in Italy. He belonged to the medical
Euclid (1,965 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Proclus c. 450 AD and Pappus of Alexandria c. 320 AD. Proclus introduces Euclid only briefly in his Commentary on the Elements. According to Proclus,
Neoplatonism (6,944 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
include Syrianus, Olympiodorus the Younger, Proclus and Damascius. Later Neoplatonists such as Iamblichus and Proclus embraced a certain kind of spiritual exercise
Larginus Proclus (75 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Larginus Proclus lived in the 1st century in Germany. He predicted that the Roman emperor Domitian would die on a certain day. He was in consequence sent
Agapius (philosopher) (155 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
school in Athens when Marinus of Neapolis was scholarch after the death of Proclus (c. 485). He was admired for his love of learning and for putting forward
Liber de Causis (414 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
from Proclus' Elements of Theology. This was first noticed by Thomas Aquinas, following William of Moerbeke's translation of the works of Proclus into
Origen the Pagan (215 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Origen, whom Porphyry disliked. He is also mentioned several times by Proclus, and it is clear that Origen's fellow students Plotinus and Longinus treated
Pons asinorum (1,635 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
drawing auxiliary lines to these extensions. But, as Euclid's commentator Proclus points out, Euclid never uses the second conclusion and his proof can be
Olympiodorus the Elder (152 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
He is most famous for being the teacher of the important Neoplatonist Proclus (412–485), whom Olympiodorus wanted his own daughter to marry. Owing to
Proclus of Naucratis (217 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Proclus or Proklos (Greek: Πρόκλος) was a teacher of rhetoric and a native of Naucratis in Hellenistic Egypt. He lived in the 2nd century. He was a man
Angel (Michelangelo) (40 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
is 51.5 cm. It is situated in the Basilica of San Domenico, Bologna. Basilica of San Domenico St. Proclus (Michelangelo) St. Petronius (Michelangelo)
Palus Somni (167 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
edge, Crile to the east, and Franz to the northwest. The bright crater Proclus is to the northeast. In 1907 it was described as having "a color which
Proculus (prefect of Constantinople) (369 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Proculus (died in Constantinople, November 16, 393) or Proklos (Greek: Πρόκλος) was Eparch of Constantinople during the reign of Theodosius the Great (r
Lesches (233 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pausanias x. 25. 5; also in x. 26. 4 and .8 and x. 27. 1. Proclus. Chrestomathy, ii. Proclus. Chrestomathy, ii. Aristotle. Poetics, 23.  This article incorporates
Neoplatonism and Christianity (1,203 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pseudo-Areopagite, who was influenced by later Neoplatonists, such as Proclus and Damascius. Certain central tenets of Neoplatonism served as a philosophical
Caius (presbyter) (400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Against Proclus," we are indebted to Eusebius, who included them in his Ecclesiastical History. In one of these fragments, Caius tells Proclus, "And I
Aedesia (186 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
with great distinction by all the philosophers there, and especially by Proclus, to whom she had been betrothed by Syrianus, when she was quite young.
List of metaphysicians (218 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
articles Pythagoras Democritus Heraclitus Anaximander Plotinus Lucretius Proclus Lycaeus Zeno of Elea Parmenides Protagoras Plato Aristotle Thomas Aquinas
Berthold of Moosburg (326 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1340 and 1361, was a major statement of the importance for Platonism of Proclus. He opposed his Christian-Platonic synthesis to Aristotelian philosophy
Philip of Opus (561 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elder, Plutarch, (who states that he demonstrated the figure of the Moon), Proclus, and Alexander of Aphrodisias. His astronomical observations were made
Asclepiodotus of Alexandria (280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
half of the 5th century. He was a native of Alexandria who studied under Proclus in Athens. He eventually moved to Aphrodisias where he maintained a philosophy
Ioane Petritsi (446 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Byzantine Empire and Kingdom of Georgia, best known for his translations of Proclus, along with an extensive commentary. In later sources, he is also referred
Menaechmus (1,065 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the quadratrix), Dinostratus, is known solely from the writings of Proclus. Proclus also mentions that Menaechmus was taught by Eudoxus. There is a curious
Trojan War (11,577 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
0-674-99328-4. Proclus, Chrestomathy, in Fragments of the Kypria translated by H.G. Evelyn-White, 1914 (public domain). Proclus, Proclus' Summary of the
Menaechmus (1,065 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the quadratrix), Dinostratus, is known solely from the writings of Proclus. Proclus also mentions that Menaechmus was taught by Eudoxus. There is a curious
Zeno of Elea (1,004 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-0-434-99164-8. OCLC 222336129.  Proclus; Morrow, Glenn R.; Dillon, John M. (1992) [1987]. Proclus' Commentary on Plato's Parmenides. Princeton
On the Mysteries of the Egyptians, Chaldeans, and Assyrians (184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
consists mainly of Iamblichus' responses to the criticisms of his teacher. Proclus, writing 100 years after Iamblichus, seems to have ascribed to him the
Argonautica Orphica (234 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Orphic Hymns and other hymns such as the Homeric Hymns and those of Proclus and Callimachus. Another related work is the Lithica (describing the properties
Perseus (geometer) (216 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Few details of Perseus' life are known, as he is mentioned only by Proclus and Geminus; none of his own works have survived. The spiric sections
Crile (crater) (322 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
west. This formation was previously designated Proclus F before being renamed by the IAU in 1976. Proclus itself is located to the north-northeast. Crile
Quadrivium (760 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"quadrivium" was not used until Boethius early in the sixth century. As Proclus wrote: The Pythagoreans considered all mathematical science to be divided
Dawn (Michelangelo) (49 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
Ammonius Hermiae (904 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of the Neoplatonist philosophers Hermias and Aedesia. He was a pupil of Proclus in Athens, and taught at Alexandria for most of his life, writing commentaries
Platonism (2,373 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Academy was re-established during this period; its most renowned head was Proclus (died 485), a celebrated commentator on Plato's writings. The Academy persisted
Timaeus of Locri (231 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
De re publica (I, X, 16), where he is described as an intimate of Plato Proclus, in his Commentary on Plato's Timaeus (II, 38, I) Simplicius and Diogenes
Hippopede (314 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
them. Hippopedes were also investigated by Proclus (for whom they are sometimes called Hippopedes of Proclus) and Eudoxus. For d = −c, the hippopede corresponds
Daphnephoria (297 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
when his son Heracles had been Daphnephoros. The festival is described by Proclus, quoted by Photius in his Bibliotheca, codex 239.  This article incorporates
Mare Crisium (707 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Picard are the craters Peirce and Swift. The ray system of the crater Proclus overlie the northwestern mare. Mare Anguis can be seen northeast of Mare
Franz (crater) (381 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Attached to the exterior of the eastern rim is Proclus E, a merged double-crater formation. Proclus lies to the east across the Palus Somni, or Marsh
Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite (5,360 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of his ideas — including at times passages almost word for word — from Proclus, who died in 485 — thus providing at the least a late fifth century early
Abstraction (mathematics) (575 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the earliest extant documentation of the axioms of plane geometry—though Proclus tells of an earlier axiomatisation by Hippocrates of Chios. In the 17th
Theurgy (1,537 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
uniting with the divine, achieving henosis, and perfecting oneself. Proclus (c. 480): theurgy is "a power higher than all human wisdom embracing the
Iamblichus (2,157 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
preserved by Stobaeus and others. The notes of his successors, especially Proclus, as well as his five extant books and the sections of his great work on
Plutarch of Athens (459 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
disciples were Syrianus, who succeeded him as head of the school, and Proclus. Plutarch's main principle was that the study of Aristotle must precede
Heliodorus of Alexandria (149 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
philosophy school. Aedesia took them to Athens where they studied under Proclus. Eventually they returned to Alexandria, where they both taught philosophy
Theodorus of Asine (135 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
disciple of Porphyry, and one of the most eminent of the Neoplatonists. Proclus repeatedly mentions him in his commentaries on Plato, and frequently adds
Lemniscate (840 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
shape can be traced back to Proclus, a Greek Neoplatonist philosopher and mathematician who lived in the 5th century AD. Proclus considered the cross-sections
Trapezoid (1,777 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
translated trapezoid (τραπέζοειδη, trapézoeide, "table-like") was by Marinus Proclus (412 to 485 AD) in his Commentary on the first book of Euclid's Elements
Ray system (593 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
side with pronounced ray systems are Aristarchus, Copernicus, Kepler, Proclus, and Tycho. Similar ray systems also occur on the far side of the Moon
Crouching Boy (88 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
The Over-Soul (866 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
in the works of Plato, Plutarch, and Neoplatonists like Plotinus and Proclus – all of whose writings Emerson read extensively throughout his career
Scholia (628 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
AD) on Virgil's Aeneid Macrobius (c. 400 AD) on Cicero's Dream of Scipio Proclus (c. 440 AD) on Plato's Parmenides and Timaeus and Euclid's Elements Boethius
Aethiopis (696 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chrestomathy attributed to an unknown "Proclus" (possibly to be identified with the 2nd-century AD grammarian Eutychius Proclus). Fewer than ten other references
Platonic Academy (2,614 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
which Proclus eventually inherited from Plutarch and Syrianus. The heads of the Neoplatonic Academy were Plutarch of Athens, Syrianus, Proclus, Marinus
Trammel of Archimedes (481 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
such ellipsographs is not certain, but they are believed to date back to Proclus and perhaps even to the time of Archimedes. Wooden versions of the
Brutus (Michelangelo) (75 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
Kenneth Sylvan Guthrie (1,379 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
vision of a sage by the name of Proclus, giving lectures in a language unknown to Verch. When Guthrie told Verch about Proclus and his works, Mr. Verch begged
Orion of Thebes (115 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
460s) was a 5th-century grammarian of Thebes (Egypt), the teacher of Proclus the neo-Platonist, and of Eudocia, the wife of Emperor Theodosius II. He
Euclid's Elements (4,335 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
instrumental in the development of logic and modern science. According to Proclus the term "element" was used to describe a theorem that is all-pervading
John XIII of Constantinople (12 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Great chain of being (2,768 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of nature"), is a concept derived from Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, and Proclus; further developed during the Middle Ages, it reached full expression in
Athanasius II of Constantinople (20 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Diogenes of Byzantium (58 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Euzois of Byzantium (43 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Cyril III of Constantinople (35 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Eleutherius of Byzantium (54 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Philadelphus of Byzantium (38 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Cyriacus I of Byzantium (26 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Laurence of Byzantium (44 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
St. Petronius (Michelangelo) (37 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
Dometius of Byzantium (57 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Felix of Byzantium (65 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Sedecion of Byzantium (54 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Ancient commentators project (93 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charlton 2005 Philoponus Against Proclus on the Eternity of the World 1-5 M. Share 2005 Philoponus Against Proclus on the Eternity of the World 6-8 M
Telegony (1,583 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of the Telegonus myth in Proclus' Chrestomathy. The poem opens after the events depicted in the Odyssey. According to Proclus' summary, the Telegony opens
Menelaus of Alexandria (402 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
He was called Menelaus of Alexandria by both Pappus of Alexandria and Proclus, and a conversation of his with Lucius, held in Rome, is recorded by Plutarch
Zeno of Sidon (332 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
iii. 17. Cicero, de Natura Deorum, i. 93. Diogenes Laërtius, x. 26 Diogenes Laërtius, vii. 35 PHerc. 1471 PHerc. 182 Proclus, ad I. Euclid. iii.
Little Iliad (961 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
chrestomathy) attributed to an unknown "Proclus" (possibly to be identified with the 2nd-century CE grammarian Eutychius Proclus). Numerous other references give
Proculus of Pozzuoli (779 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
saints named Proculus, see Proculus (disambiguation). Saint Proculus (Proclus) of Pozzuoli (Italian: San Procolo) was martyred around 305 AD, according
List of ancient Greek philosophers (99 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Neoplatonic Priscus of Epirus c. 305-c. 395 Neoplatonic Proclus 412 – 485 Neoplatonic Proclus Mallotes Stoic Prodicus Sophist Protagoras Sophist
Archon (3,101 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
names given by the Platonist Harpocration to the "Second God" of Numenius (Proclus in Tim. 93 C). For all the series of the ruling Gods (θεοὶ ἄρχοντες),
Plato's number (1,083 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
authors who mention or discourse about includes the names of Aristotle, Proclus for antiquity; Ficino and Cardano during the Renaissance; Zeller, Friedrich
Plotinus (5,254 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Works" in Mark Edwards (ed.), Neoplatonic Saints: The Lives of Plotinus and Proclus by their Students, Liverpool, Liverpool University Press, 2000. Anthologies
Sallustius of Emesa (395 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
follies or vices of his contemporaries, and he managed to quarrel with Proclus himself. According to Photius, he pretended to a sort of divination or
430s (1,858 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mayan city of Palenque, comes to power. Greek Neoplatonist philosopher Proclus begins studying at the Academy in Athens. June – First Council of Ephesus:
Pietro Balbi (320 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
2nd-century philosopher Albinus and the immense Theologica Platonica of Proclus in 1462, and circulated it in manuscript. Giovanni Andrea Bussi printed
Geminus (532 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mathematics. Although this work has not survived, many extracts are preserved by Proclus, Eutocius, and others. He divided mathematics into two parts: Mental (Greek:
Stasinus (331 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cypria, which is known to have contained a list of the Trojan allies. Proclus, in his Chrestomathia, gave an outline of the poem (preserved in Photius
Parmenides (dialogue) (2,792 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
those of Proclus and of Damascius, and an anonymous 3rd or 4th commentary possibly due to Porphyry. The 13th century translation of Proclus' commentary
Neith (2,557 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Oklahoma Press. pp. 60–63. ISBN 0-8061-3202-7.  Proclus (1820). The Commentaries of Proclus on the Timaeus of Plato, in Five Books. trans. Thomas
Chaldean Oracles (1,335 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Persian or Babylonian in origin. Later Neoplatonists, such as Iamblichus and Proclus, rated them highly. The 4th-century Emperor Julian suggests in his Hymn
Nicholas II of Constantinople (148 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Greek mathematics (1,986 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
survived. The only evidence comes from traditions recorded in works such as Proclus’ commentary on Euclid written centuries later. Some of these later works
Constantine I of Constantinople (23 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Cypria (1,736 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chrestomathy attributed to an unknown "Proclus" (possibly to be identified with the 2nd-century CE grammarian Eutychius Proclus, or else with an otherwise unknown
Paul II of Constantinople (26 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Atlantis (7,830 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
historical fact. His work, a commentary on Plato's Timaeus, is lost, but Proclus, a Neoplatonist of the 5th century AD, reports on it. The passage in question
Archbishop Maximianus of Constantinople (558 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Orthodox Church titles Preceded by Nestorius Archbishop of Constantinople 431–434 Succeeded by Proclus
Thales (9,052 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
to us from a book by Proclus who wrote a thousand years after Thales but is believed to have had a copy of Eudemus' book. Proclus wrote "Thales was the
Adrasteia (747 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bibliotheke, 1.1.6. Proclus, "WikiSource:Page:ProclusPlatoTheologyVolume1.djvu/336", in Taylor, Thomas, The Six Books of Proclus, the Platonic Successor
Paul III of Constantinople (23 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Diocles (mathematician) (356 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
to solve the problem of doubling the cube. The curve was alluded to by Proclus in his commentary on Euclid and attributed to Diocles by Geminus as early
John V of Constantinople (22 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Polycarpus II of Byzantium (79 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Thomas I of Constantinople (58 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Patriarch Nicetas I of Constantinople (38 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Homer (10,769 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
into 3a and 3b. In addition he adds Vita 11 from the Chrestomathia of Proclus, pp 99–102. The varying and contradictory biographical information in these
Gerasimus I of Constantinople (42 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Isidore I of Constantinople (237 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Athenodorus of Byzantium (121 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Nephon I of Constantinople (79 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
George II of Constantinople (89 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Sisinnius II of Constantinople (61 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Michel Chasles (706 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
contents of Euclid's book on the basis of the meagre data of Pappus and Proclus...one still turns to Chasles for the first appreciation of the interest
John Philoponus (2,972 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Neoplatonic philosopher Ammonius Hermiae, who had studied at Athens under Proclus. Philoponus’ early writings are based on lectures given by Ammonius, but
John XII of Constantinople (60 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
George I of Constantinople (23 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Alypius of Byzantium (78 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Joannicius I of Constantinople (194 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Leo of Constantinople (48 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Meliae (549 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
from meliai, "ash-trees" (Eustathius's reading) or "ash-tree nymphs" (Proclus' reading: see Works and Days, note 4; Apollonius of Rhodes. Argonautica
Marcus I of Byzantium (45 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Peter of Constantinople (23 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Plutarch of Byzantium (62 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Clement of Constantinople (58 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Michel Chasles (706 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
contents of Euclid's book on the basis of the meagre data of Pappus and Proclus...one still turns to Chasles for the first appreciation of the interest
Polycarpus I of Byzantium (73 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Pertinax of Byzantium (107 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Raphael II of Constantinople (176 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
John M. Dillon (421 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Oxford University Press . Morrow, G. R.; Dillon, J. M., eds. (1992) [1987], Proclus' Commentary on Plato's Parmenides (translation, introduction and commentary
Holy fathers slain at Sinai and Raithu (171 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Moses and his disciple Moses, Jeremiah, Paul, Adam, Sergius, Domnus, Proclus, Hypatius, Isaac, Macarius, Mark, Benjamin, Eusebius, Elias, and others
Eternity of the world (909 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of eternal order, must itself be eternal. The Neoplatonist philosopher Proclus (412 – 485 AD) advanced in his De Aeternitate Mundi (On the Eternity of
Priscian of Lydia (443 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ptolemy's Almagest, Iamblichus' On the Soul and the works of Plotinus and Proclus. The list is a catalog of Neoplatonic works on cosmology and natural history
Iliupersis (573 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chrestomathy written by an unknown "Proclus" (possibly to be identified with the 2nd century CE grammarian Eutychius Proclus). A few other references give indications
Manuel II of Constantinople (11 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Neophytus V of Constantinople (123 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Nilus of Constantinople (60 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Cupid (Michelangelo) (334 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
Castinus of Byzantium (112 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Head of a Faun (124 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
Night (Michelangelo) (146 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
Angle (5,192 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
other, and do not lie straight with respect to each other. According to Proclus an angle must be either a quality or a quantity, or a relationship. The
1533 in science (263 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
published in Basel, including integral diagrams and the first printing of Proclus' commentary on the first book. Gemma Frisius publishes De Locorum describendorum
William of Moerbeke (909 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Especially important was his translation of the Elements of Theology of Proclus (made in 1268), because the Elements of Theology is one of the fundamental
Isaac of Armenia (764 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Constantinople, have been preserved. A third letter addressed to Saint Proclus of Constantinople was not written by him, but dates from the tenth century
Ctesibius (432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
advantage of being under kings who loved fame and supported the arts. Proclus (the commentator on Euclid) and Hero of Alexandria (the last of the engineers
Royal Road (1,046 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
learning mathematics that "there is no Royal Road to geometry," following Proclus. Charles Sanders Peirce, in his How to Make Our Ideas Clear (1878), says
Joannicius III of Constantinople (335 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453
Tisserand (crater) (365 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
western half, with the latter part being lightly coated by ray material from Proclus to the south. By convention these features are identified on lunar maps
Dusk (Michelangelo) (92 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
Atlas Slave (56 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
Portrait of Giuliano de' Medici (1479–1516) (60 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
Rachel (sculpture) (65 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
Cyzicus (1,337 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
famous Arian theologian Eunomius of Cyzicus; Saint Dalmatius; bishops Proclus and Germanus, who became Patriarchs of Constantinople; and Saint Emilian
Day (Michelangelo) (45 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
Leah (sculpture) (65 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
Sum of angles of a triangle (830 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
straight line may be drawn through the point parallel to the given line. Proclus' axiom: If a line intersects one of two parallel lines, it must intersect
Perimeter (1,054 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of a rectangle of width 0.5 and length 2 is 5. Both areas equal to 1. Proclus (5th century) reported that Greek peasants "fairly" parted fields relying
Epinomis (623 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Laws and Epinomis to be a "secretary's style." Leonardo Tarán, "Proclus on the Old Academy," in Collected Papers 1962-1999 (Leiden: Brill, 2001)
Right angle (722 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
right angle as a unit to measure other angles with. Euclid's commentator Proclus gave a proof of this postulate using the previous postulates, but it may
Pitti Tondo (44 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
Awakening Slave (56 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
Palestrina Pietà (78 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
St. Matthew (Michelangelo) (32 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bologna, 1494–1495 Additions to the Arca di San Domenico (St Petronius, St Proclus, Angel) Rome, 1496–1500 †Sleeping Cupid Bacchus †Standing Cupid Pietà
Procopius of Gaza (434 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
writer. The fragment of a polemical treatise against the Neoplatonist Proclus is now assigned to Nicolaus, archbishop of Methone in Peloponnesus (ft
Illustrius Pusaeus (165 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Roman Empire. Pusaeus was a pupil of the Neoplatonist philosopher Proclus, at his school in Alexandria; other noteworthy figures belonged to the
Fredholm (crater) (342 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
lies mid-way between the prominent craters Macrobius to the north and Proclus almost due south. This is a circular, symmetrical formation with a bowl-shaped
Mythology (6,446 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
'middle Platonism' and neoplatonism, such writers as Plutarch, Porphyry, Proclus, Olympiodorus and Damascius wrote explicitly about the symbolic interpretation
Numenius of Apamea (1,477 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
philosophers (especially Philo and his theory of the Logos). According to Proclus, Numenius held that there was a kind of trinity of gods, the members of
Mental plane (1,361 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and hence Neoplatonism) the Divine Mind or Nous. In the metaphysics of Proclus, the Nous is only one level of hypostasis, with higher ones like Life,
Patriarch Polyeuctus of Constantinople (438 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius John I Chrysostom Arsacius Atticus Sisinnius I Nestorius Maximianus Proclus Flavian Anatolius Patriarchs of Constantinople Byzantine period (451–1453