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Longer titles found: Planters' Protective Association (view), Planters Bank Building (view), Planters Bank Building (Osceola, Arkansas) (view), Planters Building (view), Planters Development Bank (view), Planters Hall (view), Planters Mercantile (view), Planters National Bank (view), Planters Pat Bradley International (view), Plantersville (view), Plantersville, Alabama (view), Plantersville, Mississippi (view), Plantersville, South Carolina (view), Plantersville, Texas (view), New England Planters (view), United Coconut Planters Bank (view), Ceylon Planters' Rifle Corps (view), Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association (view), Union Planters (view), Merchants and Planters Bank Building (view), London Society of West India Planters and Merchants (view), Clarksdale Planters (view), New London Planters (view), Old Planters (Massachusetts) (view)

searching for Planters 480 found (4776 total)

alternate case: planters

Planter class (2,275 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

forced labor of enslaved Africans. The Atlantic slave trade permitted planters access to inexpensive labor for the planting and harvesting of crops such
Plantar wart (1,447 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A plantar wart is a wart occurring on the bottom of the foot or toes. Their color is typically similar to that of the skin. Small black dots often occur
Plantation (3,461 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
historians of the antebellum South defined planters as those who held 20 or more slaves. Major planters held many more, especially in the Deep South
Hevea brasiliensis (1,388 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hevea brasiliensis, the Pará rubber tree, sharinga tree, seringueira, or, most commonly, the rubber tree or rubber plant, is a flowering plant belonging
Plantation complexes in the Southern United States (9,200 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
indicate that fewer than 30 percent of planters employed white supervisors for their slave labor. Some planters appointed a trusted slave as the overseer
Planter's punch (132 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Angostura bitters. The cocktail has been said to have originated at the Planters Hotel in Charleston, South Carolina. The September 1878 issue of the London
Minelayer (1,070 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
mine's effective range. Before World War I, mine ships were termed mine planters generally. For example, in an address to the United States Navy ships of
Mine planter (vessel) (3,124 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Thus the vessels required to place the torpedoes were termed torpedo planters with the equipment evolving with the mines. For example, in the record
Leicester Riders (955 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Leicester Riders, is a British professional basketball team in the British Basketball League (BBL) and in 2018 represented British basketball by playing
USCG seagoing buoy tender (832 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
designation was changed to WLB, which is still used today. Six U.S. Army mine planters built 1917–1919 were transferred to the U.S. Light House Service during
James Kimbrough Jones (313 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James Kimbrough Jones (September 29, 1839 – June 1, 1908) was a Confederate Army veteran, plantation owner, lawyer, US Congressional Representative, United
Hernando Money (490 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hernando DeSoto Money (August 26, 1839 – September 18, 1912) was an American politician from the state of Mississippi. Money was born in Holmes County
USS Chimo (ACM-1) (329 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The second USS Chimo (ACM-1) was the lead ship of her class of minelayers in the United States Navy during World War II. Chimo was built as USAMP Colonel
Plantations of Ireland (5,998 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Munster and Leinster. The Crown granted these lands to colonists ("planters") from England. This process began during the reign of Henry VIII and continued
William Berkeley (governor) (1,595 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
policies toward the Native Americans that led to the revolt by some of the planters in 1676 which became known as Bacon's Rebellion. In the aftermath, King
List of ships of the United States Army (9,016 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
coastal freighters of numerous designs, 361 minecraft with the large Mine Planters carrying U.S. Army Mine Planter (prefix "USAMP") with a number above a
Augustine Washington (746 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Augustine Washington Sr. (November 12, 1694 – April 12, 1743) was the father of the first U.S. President George Washington. He belonged to the Colony of
Joseph Clay Stiles Blackburn (643 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Clay Stiles Blackburn (October 1, 1838 – September 12, 1918) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Kentucky. Blackburn, a skilled and
Robert Singleton-Salmon (253 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to the Planters' Association of Ceylon. Singleton-Salmon was the president of the Ceylon Road Federation, a Life Member of the Ceylon Planters' Association
Henry Warren Ogden (273 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Warren Ogden (October 21, 1842 – July 23, 1905) was a member of the United States House of Representatives for Louisiana's 4th congressional district
John Branch (505 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Branch Jr. (November 4, 1782 – January 3, 1863) was an American politician who served as U.S. Senator, Secretary of the Navy, the 19th Governor of
Nilgiri tea (586 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
plantations are represented by the Nilgiri Planters' Association, which is an organizational member of the United Planters Association of South India (UPASI)
John Bennett Dawson (264 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Bennett Dawson (March 17, 1798 – June 26, 1845) was a United States House of Representatives member from the state of Louisiana. Born near Nashville
Camanche (ACM-11) (962 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
an 1863/1864 monitor. As the lead ship of the second group of Army mine planters transferred to Navy the ship gave its name to the Camanche-class auxiliary
Goode Bryan (641 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Goode Bryan (August 31, 1811 – August 16, 1885) was a planter, politician, military officer, and American Civil War general in the Confederate States Army
Albert G. Jenkins (979 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Albert Gallatin Jenkins (November 10, 1830 – May 21, 1864) was a Virginia attorney, planter, slaveholder, politician and soldier from what would become
John M. Sandidge (219 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Milton Sandidge (January 7, 1817 – March 30, 1890) was a U.S. Representative from Louisiana. Born near Carnesville, Georgia, Sandidge moved to Louisiana
Charles Washington (246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Washington (May 2, 1738 – September 16, 1799) was the youngest brother of United States President George Washington. He was a son of Augustine
Daniel Parke Custis (1,106 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Daniel Parke Custis (October 15, 1711 – July 8, 1757) was an American planter and politician who was the first husband of Martha Dandridge. After his death
John Augustine Washington (444 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Augustine Washington (1736–1787) was a member of the fifth Virginia Convention and a founding member of the Mississippi Land Company. During the American
Thomas Henry Carter (soldier) (469 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Henry Carter (June 13, 1831 – June 2, 1908) was an artillery officer in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. His battalion
Junius Daniel (988 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Junius Daniel (June 27, 1828 – May 13, 1864) was a planter and career military officer, serving in the United States Army, then in the Confederate States
Augustine Washington Jr. (320 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Augustine Washington Jr. (1720–1762) was an American soldier, planter, politician, and member of the Washington family. He was the second and youngest
William T. Wofford (1,088 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Tatum Wofford (June 28, 1824 – May 22, 1884) was an officer during the Mexican–American War and a general in the Confederate States Army during
Joseph P. Newsham (304 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Parkinson Newsham (May 24, 1837 – October 22, 1919) was a 19th-century politician, lawyer, merchant and planter from Louisiana. Born in Preston
Thomas Nelson Jr. (1,279 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Nelson Jr. (December 26, 1738 – January 4, 1789) was an American planter, soldier, and statesman from Yorktown, Virginia. He represented Virginia
John Washington (1,174 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
John Washington (1631–1677) was an English planter, soldier, and politician in colonial Virginia in North America. He was a lieutenant colonel in the local
Isaac E. Avery (804 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Isaac Erwin Avery (December 20, 1828 – July 3, 1863) was a planter and an officer in the Confederate States Army. He died at the Battle of Gettysburg during
Champaran Satyagraha (1,380 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Africa in 1915, and saw peasants in northern India oppressed by indigo planters, he tried to use the same methods that he had used in South Africa to organize
John Parke Custis (1,322 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
John Parke Custis ("Jacky") (27 November 1754 – 5 November 1781) was a Virginia planter and the son of Martha Washington and stepson of George Washington
Joseph Habersham (611 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Habersham (July 28, 1751 – November 17, 1815) was an American businessman, Georgia politician, soldier in the Continental Army, and Postmaster General
Joseph Habersham (611 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Habersham (July 28, 1751 – November 17, 1815) was an American businessman, Georgia politician, soldier in the Continental Army, and Postmaster General
Ranjan Wijeratne (770 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bosanquet and Skrine. He was the Chairman of Planters Society from 1967 to 1968 and the Chairman of Planters Association of Ceylon from 1970 to 1971. He
Paul Hamilton (politician) (318 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Paul Hamilton (October 16, 1762 – June 30, 1816) was the 3rd United States Secretary of the Navy, from 1809 to 1813. Paul Hamilton was born in Saint Paul's
Kasabonika Lake First Nation (348 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was 866. The residents of Kasabonika were professional, and expert, tree planters for the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources for many years in the 1960s
Abraham B. Venable (301 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abraham Bedford Venable (November 20, 1758 – December 26, 1811) was a representative and senator from Virginia. He was the uncle of US Representative Abraham
John Moore (Louisiana) (191 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
John Moore (1788 – 17 June 1867) was an American statesman and planter from Louisiana. He served in the U.S. Congress from 1840 to 1843 and again from
Francis Lightfoot Lee (511 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Francis Lightfoot Lee (October 14, 1734 – January 11, 1797) was a member of the House of Burgesses in the Colony of Virginia. As an active protester regarding
Samuel Ogle (563 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Ogle (c. 1694 – 3 May 1752) was the 16th, 18th and 20th Proprietary Governor of Maryland from 1731 to 1732, 1733 to 1742, and 1746/1747 to 1752
Thomas Stone (769 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Stone (1743 – October 5, 1787) was an American planter and lawyer who signed the United States Declaration of Independence as a delegate for Maryland
John Hanson (2,963 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Hanson (April 14 [O.S. April 3] 1721 – November 15, 1783) was a merchant and public official from Maryland during the era of the American Revolution
Pierre Bossier (605 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Evariste Jean-Baptiste Bossier (pronounced Boh Zhay) (March 22, 1797 – April 24, 1844) was a planter, soldier and politician born in Natchitoches
Adolph Meyer (370 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Adolph Meyer (October 19, 1842 – March 8, 1908) was a member of the U. S. House of Representatives representing the state of Louisiana. He served nine
George W. Randolph (814 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
George Wythe Randolph (March 10, 1818 – April 3, 1867) was a lawyer, planter, and Confederate general. He served for eight months in 1862 as the Confederate
Edwin E. Willis (1,143 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ku Klux Klan. In Congress, Willis sought to secure subsidies for sugar planters. He successfully sponsored legislation to obtain federal funds for the
Joseph E. Ransdell (1,383 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Book Club, Inc., 1933), p. 81. James Matthew Reonas, Once Proud Princes: Planters and Plantation Culture in Louisiana's Northeast Delta, From the First World
Nil Darpan (1,804 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
charged with sedition. I present "The Indigo Planting Mirror" to the Indigo Planters' hands; now, let every one of them, having observed his face, erase the
William Nelson (governor) (120 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
William Nelson (1711 – November 19, 1772) was an American planter, politician, and colonial leader from Yorktown, Virginia. In the interim between the
John Tyler Sr. (470 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
John Tyler Sr. (February 28, 1747 – January 6, 1813) was a Virginia planter, 15th Governor of Virginia, United States District Judge of the United States
Raffles Place Park (135 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the park. The lush Zoysia lawns on raised planters is the main feature of this park. These raised planters can also be rendered as sitting platform for
John Wayles Eppes (749 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Wayles Eppes (April 19, 1773 – September 13, 1823) was an American lawyer and politician. He represented Virginia in the U.S. House of Representatives
1811 German Coast uprising (3,723 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and killed several others without trial. Over the next two weeks, white planters and officials interrogated, tried, executed and decapitated an additional
Tobacco in the American colonies (2,026 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
included the enslavement and importation of African people to grow crops. Planters filled large hogsheads with tobacco and conveyed them to inspection warehouses
Samuel Washington (877 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Washington (November 27, 1734 [O.S. November 16, 1734] – September 26, 1781) was a colonial American officer and politician who was the brother
Thibodaux massacre (2,035 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
first conducted by a formal labor organization, the Knights of Labor. At planters' requests, the state sent in militia to protect strikebreakers, and work
Georgetown, South Carolina (2,822 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
homes. The Indian trade declined soon after Georgetown was established. Planters established large plantations and cultivated indigo as the cash commodity
Sub-irrigated planter (192 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Sub-irrigated planter (SIP) is a generic name for a special type of planting box used in container gardening and commercial landscaping. A SIP is any method
John Hoskins Stone (457 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
John Hoskins Stone (ca. 1750 – October 5, 1804) was an American planter, soldier, and politician from Charles County, Maryland. During the Revolutionary
John Francis Mercer (287 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
John Francis Mercer (May 17, 1759 – August 30, 1821) was an American lawyer, planter, and politician from Virginia and Maryland. Mercer was born in 1759
First Families of Virginia (1,821 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
First Families remained in Virginia, where they flourished as tobacco planters, and from the sale of slaves to the cotton states to the south. Indeed
Robert Carter I (1,028 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert "King" Carter (1662/63 – 4 August 1732), of Lancaster County, was an American businessman and colonist in Virginia and became one of the wealthiest
Daniel Carroll (1,357 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
George's County, Maryland on July 22, 1730. He was the son of wealthy planters Daniel Carroll (c.1696 - 1751) and Eleanor Darnall Carroll (1703 - 1796)
Otto Sverdrup (1,326 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Otto Neumann Knoph Sverdrup (31 October 1854, in Bindal, Helgeland – 26 November 1930) was a Norwegian sailor and Arctic explorer. He was born in Bindal
Harish Chandra Mukherjee (745 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
patriot, who fought for the indigo cultivators (and against the indigo planters) and forced the government to bring about changes. Son of Ramdhan Mukherjee
Music of Grenada (796 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
entertainment on social occasions for planters. Slaves were forbidden to practice their culture, as the planters realized their music and dance were used
Peyton Randolph (1,162 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Peyton Randolph (September 10, 1721 – October 22, 1775) was a planter and public official from the Colony of Virginia. He served as Speaker of the Virginia
Peter Jefferson (1,357 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
their lives as tobacco planters, militiamen, road builders; they were ambitious, practical, businesslike individuals. Planters large and small transported
John Walton (Continental Congress) (122 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
John Walton (1738–1783) was a Georgia delegate to the Continental Congress. Though born in Virginia, Walton later became a planter near Augusta, Georgia
John Y. Mason (719 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Young Mason (April 18, 1799 – October 3, 1859) was a United States Representative from Virginia, the 16th and 18th United States Secretary of the
Joseph Kent (843 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Kent (January 14, 1779 – November 24, 1837), a Whig, was a United States Senator from Maryland, serving from 1833 until his death in 1837. He also
Daniel Rogers (politician) (490 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Daniel Rogers (January 3, 1754 – February 2, 1806) was an American miller and politician from Milford, in Sussex County, Delaware. He was a member of the
Henry Lee III (2,034 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Major-General Henry Lee III (January 29, 1756 – March 25, 1818) was an early American Patriot and politician. He served as the ninth Governor of Virginia
Live Company Group (1,514 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
plc, Lincoln House plc, William Morris Fine Arts plc and Ceylon & Indian Planters Holdings' plc. It is a listed company in the Alternative Investment Market
Samuel Adams (Arkansas politician) (232 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Samuel Adams (June 5, 1805 – February 27, 1850) was an American politician who served as Acting Governor of Arkansas from April to November 1844. Adams
Patriot (American Revolution) (1,164 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
included lawyers such as John Adams, students such as Alexander Hamilton, planters such as Thomas Jefferson and George Mason, merchants such as Alexander
Thomas H. Watts (645 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Hill Watts (January 3, 1819 – September 16, 1892) was the 18th Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1863 to 1865, during the Civil War. Watts
James Stephens Bulloch (676 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
James Stephens Bulloch (1793 – February 18, 1849) was an early Georgia settler and planter. He was a grandson of Georgia governor Archibald Bulloch and
Jeremiah McLain Rusk (728 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jeremiah McLain Rusk (June 17, 1830 – November 21, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, the 15th Governor of the U.S. state of Wisconsin from 1882 to 1889
Carter Braxton (2,658 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Landon Carter, Benjamin Harrison V, Edmund Pendleton and other conservative planters. Carter Braxton was born on Newington Plantation in King and Queen County
William K. Sebastian (501 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
William King Sebastian (1812 – May 20, 1865) was an American planter, lawyer, and U.S. senator from Helena, Arkansas. He represented Arkansas as a U.S
Samuel Adams (Arkansas politician) (232 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Samuel Adams (June 5, 1805 – February 27, 1850) was an American politician who served as Acting Governor of Arkansas from April to November 1844. Adams
John F. Lewis (418 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
John Francis Lewis (March 1, 1818 – September 2, 1895) was an American planter and politician from Rockingham County, Virginia. He served two terms as
V. G. W. Ratnayake (371 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
460 votes. Ratnayake also served as the Chairman of the Morawaka Korale Planters Association and was an active member on the Board of Management of the
Lewis P. Featherstone (510 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Lewis Porter Featherstone (July 28, 1851 – March 14, 1922) was a planter and farm activist who served as a Labor Party U.S. Representative from Arkansas
William Henry Fitzhugh Lee (1,369 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Henry Fitzhugh Lee (May 31, 1837 – October 15, 1891), known as Rooney Lee (often spelled "Roony" among friends and family) or W.H.F. Lee, was the
Thomas Jefferson Randolph (1,420 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Civil War, he held a colonel's commission in the Confederate Army. Most planters were excused from active service. Continuing to be active in politics after
Slavery in Cuba (2,875 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
increased the imports of slaves in order to keep the loyalty of European-Cuban planters and to increase the revenues from the lucrative sugar trade, as the crop
Robert Woodward Barnwell (499 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Woodward Barnwell (August 10, 1801 – November 5, 1882) was an American planter, lawyer, and educator from South Carolina who served as a Senator
Robert Ward Johnson (938 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Ward Johnson (July 22, 1814 – July 26, 1879) was an American politician from Arkansas who served as a U.S. Representative (1847–1853), U.S. Senator
John Clark (Georgia governor) (274 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
John Clark (sometimes spelled Clarke) (February 28, 1766 – October 12, 1832) was an American planter and politician. Clark was born in 1766 in Edgecombe
Henry Laurens (1,724 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Laurens (March 6, 1724 [O.S. February 24, 1723] – December 8, 1792) was an American merchant, slave trader, and rice planter from South Carolina
Stevens Thomson Mason (senator) (401 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Stevens Thomson Mason (December 29, 1760 – May 10, 1803) was a Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, a member of the Virginia state
Thomas Collins (governor) (659 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Thomas Collins (1732 – March 29, 1789) was an American planter and politician from Smyrna, in Kent County, Delaware. He was an officer of the Delaware
Logan H. Roots (277 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Logan Holt Roots (March 26, 1841 – May 30, 1893) was a U.S. Representative for Arkansas' 1st congressional district. Roots was born near Tamaros in Perry
Richard K. Call (952 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Keith Call (October 24, 1792 – September 14, 1862) was an American attorney and politician, the 3rd and 5th territorial governor of Florida. Before
Armistead Thomson Mason (401 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Armistead Thomson Mason (August 4, 1787 – February 6, 1819), the son of Stevens Thomson Mason, was a U.S. Senator from Virginia from 1816 to 1817. Mason
John Edwards (Kentucky politician) (182 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
John Edwards (1748 – 1837) was an American planter and statesman who played a key role in securing Kentucky statehood, and represented the new state in
Mississippi Delta (4,310 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
land along the riverfronts for cotton plantations; they became wealthy planters dependent on the labor of black slaves, who comprised the vast majority
James Brice (272 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
James Brice (August 26, 1746 – July 11, 1801) was an American planter, lawyer, and politician from Annapolis, Maryland. He was Governor of Maryland in
Aylett Hawes (332 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Aylett Hawes (April 21, 1768 – August 31, 1833) was a nineteenth-century doctor, planter, politician and planter from Virginia. Born in Culpeper County
J. E. Amaratunga (267 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
John Edmund Amaratunga was a Ceylonese planter, lawyer and politician. In October 1929 he enrolled at Lincoln's Inn and on 18 November 1933 was called
History of Mississippi (15,042 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
native Choctaw and Chickasaw people west of the Mississippi River. White planters developed an economy based on the export of cotton produced by slave labor
Richard Brent (politician) (330 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Richard Brent (1757 – December 30, 1814) was an American planter, lawyer, and politician from Stafford County, Virginia. He represented Virginia in both
William E. Jones (1,858 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Edmondson "Grumble" Jones (May 9, 1824 – June 5, 1864) was a Confederate cavalry general with a reputation for being a martinet to his troopers
Bumbo (160 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
other freebies during election campaigns was referred to as "swilling the planters with bumbo". George Washington was particularly noted for using this technique
Crisis of 1772 (1,513 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
plantation colonies. The merchants in London helped the planters sell their crops and shipped what planters wanted to purchase in London as returns. The commission
Asa Hodges (241 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asa Hodges (January 22, 1822 – June 6, 1900) was a one-term U.S. Representative for Arkansas's 1st congressional district, with service from 1873 to 1875
Ayres Phillips Merrill (95 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Ayres Phillips Merrill (1825–1883) was an American planter and diplomat. He was the owner of a plantation in Adams County, Mississippi, and he served as
George Mason II (467 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
George Mason II (1660–1716) was an early American planter and statesman. Mason was the grandfather of George Mason IV, a Founding Father of the United
Joseph Haslet (939 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Haslet (1769 – June 20, 1823) was an American planter and politician from Cedar Creek Village in Cedar Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware. He
American gentry (1,386 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
favorite leisure activity enjoyed by the gentry, worldwide. Like most planters in Virginia, Washington imported luxury items and other fine wares from
Edward Porter Alexander (2,842 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
born in Washington, Georgia into a wealthy and distinguished family of planters of the Old South. He was the sixth of ten children of Adam Leopold Alexander
Jehu Davis (692 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
John (Jehu) Davis (1738 – May 11, 1802) was an American planter and politician from Mispillion Hundred, in Kent County, Delaware, west of Milford. He served
Archibald Yell (989 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
focused on internal improvements, as infrastructure was needed to benefit planters and farmers. He also worked to better control banks and supported public
Isham Randolph of Dungeness (1,042 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Isham Randolph (December 1684 – November 1742), sometimes referred to as Isham Randolph of Dungeness, was the maternal grandfather of United States President
John Cook (governor) (768 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
John Cook (1730 – October 27, 1789) was an American planter and politician from Smyrna, in Kent County, Delaware. He served in the Delaware General Assembly
Thomas Overton Moore (953 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Overton Moore (April 10, 1804 – June 25, 1876) was an attorney and politician who was the 16th Governor of Louisiana from 1860 until 1864 during
Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron (1,305 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Virginia tract, both from the sale of land and the annual quit rents, paid by planters who settled in the Northern Neck. These rents were collected by his resident
Joseph W. Matthews (423 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Warren Matthews (1812 – August 27, 1862) was an American politician who served as Governor of Mississippi from 1848 to 1850. Matthews was born near
Ambrose Madison (773 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
acquired 4,657 acres of land in present-day Orange County, Virginia, where planters from the Tidewater were moving for new land to support tobacco cultivation
Portuguese Surinamese (151 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sponsored by a coalition of planters and by the colonial government. They were actually on their way to British Guiana, where the planters also sought alternative
Seed drill (1,651 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
row cannot be adjusted by the user as in the case of vacuum precision planters. The distance between rows is typically set by the manufacturer. This allows
Samuel F. Patterson (273 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Finley Patterson (1799–1874) was a North Carolina politician, planter, and businessman. Born in Rockbridge County, Virginia, Patterson went to live
Benjamin Harrison V (3,926 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
splitting of slave families in the distribution of his estate. As with all planters, the Harrisons provided for the sustenance of the slaves on their plantations
Ambrose Madison (773 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
acquired 4,657 acres of land in present-day Orange County, Virginia, where planters from the Tidewater were moving for new land to support tobacco cultivation
Pottiputki (235 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
early 1970s, used for manual planting of containerized seedlings. The planters can work in an ergonomically correct position while maintaining high productivity
History of South Carolina (16,161 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Carolina at the port of Charleston in 1670; they were mostly wealthy planters and their slaves coming from the English Caribbean colony of Barbados.
James E. Broome (208 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James Emilius Broome (December 15, 1808 – November 23, 1883) was an American politician who was the third Governor of Florida. Broome was born in Hamburg
Thomas Mason (1770–1800) (403 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Thomas Mason (May 1, 1770 – September 18, 1800) was an early American businessman, planter, and politician. As a son of George Mason, a Founding Father
William R. King (2,187 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786 – April 18, 1853) was an American politician and diplomat. He was the 13th vice president of the United States
George Plater (981 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
George Plater III (November 8, 1735 – February 10, 1792) was an American planter, lawyer, and statesman from Saint Mary's County, Maryland. He represented
Desha County, Arkansas (1,404 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Arkansas Delta, Desha County's rivers and fertile soils became prosperous for planters under the cotton-based economy of plantation agriculture in the antebellum
Cotton Belt (424 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
rapidly became the leading cotton-producing region in Mississippi. Natchez planters developed new cotton plant hybrids and a mechanized system that fueled
Albert Estopinal (1,915 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Albert Estopinal, Sr. (January 30, 1845 – April 28, 1919), was a sugar cane planter from St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, who served as a Democrat in both
Nathaniel Macon (2,224 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nathaniel Macon (December 17, 1757 – June 29, 1837) was an American politician who represented North Carolina in both houses of Congress. He was the fifth
Thomas Claiborne (1749–1812) (233 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Thomas Claiborne (February 1, 1749 – 1812) was a planter and politician from Brunswick County, Virginia, who represented Virginia in the United States
Indigo revolt (832 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
movement and subsequent uprising of indigo farmers against the indigo planters that arose in Chaugacha village of Nadia in Bengal in 1859. Indigo planting
George Mason III (517 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
George Mason III (1690—March 5, 1735) was an early American planter, businessman, and statesman. Mason was the father of George Mason IV, a Founding Father
Invasion of Guadeloupe (1794) (240 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
French Revolutionary Wars. The British had negotiated with the French planters, Ignace-Joseph-Philippe de Perpignan and Louis de Curt, who wished to gain
William Pinckney Mason (258 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Pinckney Mason (10 January 1843 – 16 December 1922) was a Lieutenant in the Confederate States Navy, ultimately serving as commander of several
Regions Tower (Indianapolis) (392 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
names Indiana National Bank Tower (1970–1989) NBD Tower (1989–1998) Union Planters Tower (1998–2004) Alternative names One Indiana Square General information
History of Barbados (4,883 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
established the House of Assembly in 1639, in an effort to appease the planters, who might otherwise have opposed his controversial appointment. In the
History of the Jews in Suriname (688 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the Jewish population in the Western Hemisphere, and Jews there were planters and slaveholders." The plantation economy of the Jodensavanne—an area of
Ceylon Defence Force (1,518 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A few Europeans had served with the British Army, vast majority were planters, landowners and professionals such as lawyers, doctors engineers and civil
Robert C. Nicholas (760 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Carter Nicholas (January 10, 1787 – December 24, 1856) was a United States Senator from Louisiana. He was a veteran of the War of 1812, and also
William Armstrong (Tennessee politician) (190 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Armstrong (1795–1847) was an American Jeffersonian Republican politician. He served as the Mayor of Nashville, Tennessee from 1829 to 1833. Armstrong
Thomson Mason (1759–1820) (400 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Thomson Mason (4 March 1759 – 11 March 1820) was a prominent entrepreneur, planter, civil servant, and justice. Mason was the son of George Mason, an American
Afro-Guyanese people (1,186 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
land to compensate for their labor, unlike future immigrant groups. When planters made land or passage home available to East Indians as part of the terms
WGHW (125 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
station serves the Wilmington area. The station is currently owned by Church Planters of America. The station went on the air as WGHW on February 10, 1998. On
John Thomson Mason (380 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Thomson Mason (15 March 1765 – 10 December 1824) was an American lawyer and Attorney General of Maryland in 1806. Mason was born on 15 March 1765
Haitian Revolution (16,042 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
no legal rights, rape by planters, their unmarried sons, or overseers was a common occurrence on the plantations. The planters and their families, together
Isaac Coles (230 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Isaac Coles (March 2, 1747 – June 3, 1813) was an American planter and statesman from Virginia. Coles was born in Richmond, Virginia in 1747. He was educated
Regions Financial Corporation (1,326 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Memphis, Tennessee based Union Planters Bank in a $5.9 billion transaction. Jackson W. Moore, the former CEO of Union Planters, became CEO of the merged company
Lawrence Washington (1718–1752) (3,158 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
ships from London to sail directly to the wharf. But, the local tobacco planters wanted to site a new town away from the river (and its "played out" tobacco
Daniel Henry Chamberlain (1,142 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Daniel Henry Chamberlain (June 23, 1835 – April 13, 1907) was an American planter, lawyer, author and the 76th Governor of South Carolina from 1874 until
John Martin (Governor of Georgia) (1,002 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
John Martin (ca. 1730 – January 1786) was an American planter, soldier, and politician. Little is known of Martin's early life. He was born in Providence
Alexander Porter (422 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander Porter (June 24, 1785 – January 13, 1844) was an attorney, politician, and planter, who served as United States Senator from Louisiana from 1833
George Hancock (Virginia) (338 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
George Hancock (June 13, 1754 – July 18, 1820) was an American planter and lawyer from Virginia. He represented Virginia as a Federalist in the U.S. House
Lynching of the Walker family (1,463 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the expansion into this area of the cotton economy, led by large-scale planters who hired many African Americans as sharecroppers. After two prominent
Thomas Amarasuriya (567 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
President of the Senate of Ceylon. He was the first Ceylonese Chairman of the Planters Association and a brother of H. W. Amarasuriya. Thomas Amarasuriya was
Freedmen's Bureau (6,881 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in cases dealing with family issues. The Bureau encouraged former major planters to rebuild their plantations and urged freed blacks to return to work for
African Americans in South Carolina (212 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
descendants were brought on South Carolina shores as slaves by wealthy white planters from Barbados. Black people constituted the majority population of the
William Mason (1757–1818) (500 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
William Mason (22 October 1757 – 7 February 1818) was a militiaman in the American Revolutionary War and a prominent Virginia planter. Mason was the son
Piracy in the British Virgin Islands (1,867 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
acting President of the Colony, Abraham Chalwill, a group of prominent planters made their way to Norman Island and recovered the treasure. They divided
William F. Gordon (197 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Fitzhugh Gordon (January 13, 1787 – August 28, 1858) was a nineteenth-century politician and lawyer from Virginia. Born at "Germanna", a plantation
Society of Suriname (284 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
citizens of the Dutch Republic were free to trade with Suriname. Also, the planters were consulted in a Council of Police, which was a unique feature among
Thomas Sim Lee (1,244 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Sim Lee (October 29, 1745 – November 9, 1819) was an American planter and statesman of Frederick County, Maryland. Although not a signatory to the
Randal McGavock (413 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Randal McGavock (1766–1843) was an American politician and Southern planter in Nashville, Tennessee. Identifying as a Jeffersonian Republican, he served
Thomas Mann Randolph Jr. (1,359 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Mann Randolph Jr. (October 1, 1768 – June 20, 1828) was an American planter, soldier, and politician from Virginia. He served as a member of both
Randal McGavock (413 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Randal McGavock (1766–1843) was an American politician and Southern planter in Nashville, Tennessee. Identifying as a Jeffersonian Republican, he served
William Nichol (mayor) (273 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
William Nichol (1800-1878) was an American banker, Whig politician and planter. He served as the Mayor of Nashville, Tennessee from 1835 to 1837. He was
Robert Rhett (1,023 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Rhett (born Robert Barnwell Smith; December 21, 1800 – September 14, 1876) was an American politician who served as a deputy from South Carolina
Alexander Barrow (261 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander Barrow I (March 27, 1801 – December 29, 1846) was a lawyer and United States Senator from Louisiana. He was a member of the Whig Party. He was
Joseph Thorpe Elliston (688 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Thorpe Elliston (1779 - November 10, 1856) was an American silversmith, planter and politician. He served as the fourth mayor of Nashville, Tennessee
Flower bouquet (1,136 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
They are also used extensively in weddings. Bouquets arranged in vases or planters for home decor can be arranged in either traditional or modern styles.
Floride Calhoun (1,034 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Floride Bonneau Calhoun (February 15, 1792 – July 25, 1866) was the wife of prominent U.S. politician John C. Calhoun. She is best known for her leading
1733 slave insurrection on St. John (2,196 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
under their own control and use Africans of other tribes as slave labor. Planters regained control by the end of May 1734, after the Akwamu were defeated
Samuel Johnston (2,026 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Johnston (December 15, 1733 – August 17, 1816) was an American planter, lawyer, and statesman from Chowan County, North Carolina. He represented
William Fleming (governor) (1,751 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Colonel William Fleming (February 18, 1727 – August 5, 1795) was an American physician, soldier, politician and planter who served as a local justice of
Martha Washington (4,983 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Martha Washington (née Dandridge; June 13  [O.S. June 2] 1731 – May 22, 1802) was the wife of George Washington, the first President of the United States
Goodfare (408 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
is a vibrant farming community, as well as home to entrepreneurs, tree planters and artists. The community centre - Goodfare Hall - is a popular venue
Plant propagation (588 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
by a metal cage which is used in gardening. The mats are made so that planters containing seedlings can be placed on top of the metal cage without the
Thomas Lynch (statesman) (326 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Other notable people share this name. See Thomas Lynch (disambiguation). Thomas Lynch (1727–1776) was an American planter and statesman from South Carolina
Confederate Home Guard (1,184 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
as a type of service to the Confederacy. It was often made up of older planters or others exempted from front line service. Citizens of some states also
Edward Parke Custis Lewis (618 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Parke Custis Lewis (February 7, 1837 – September 3, 1892) was a Confederate Army colonel, lawyer, legislator, and diplomat who served as United
Hugh Caperton (215 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Hugh Caperton (April 17, 1781 – February 9, 1847) was a nineteenth-century congressman and planter from Virginia. He was the father of Allen Taylor Caperton
Matthew Tilghman (633 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Matthew Tilghman (February 17, 1718 – May 4, 1790) was an American planter and Revolutionary leader from Maryland, who served as a delegate to the Continental
Hiram Runnels (292 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hiram George Runnels (December 15, 1796 – December 17, 1857) was a U.S. politician from the state of Mississippi. He was a Democrat who served as the ninth
Eliza Lucas (2,421 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
seed and shared it with other planters, leading to an expansion in indigo production. She proved that colonial planters could make a profit in an extremely
Religion in Guyana (2,848 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
system of values is a consequence of colonial history. To the European planters, colonial administrators, and missionaries, the profession of Christian
Perry Werden (325 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Percival Wheritt "Perry" Werden (July 21, 1865 – January 9, 1934) was an American baseball player. He was a first baseman for the St. Louis Maroons (1884)
Planter (farm implement) (824 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
tractor with a drawbar or a three-point hitch. Planters lay the seeds down in precise manner along rows. Planters vary greatly in size, from 1 row to 54, with
Thomson Mason (520 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomson Mason (14 August 1733 – 26 February 1785) was a prominent Virginia lawyer, jurist, and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Virginia. Mason was
Natchez, Mississippi (3,800 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Natchez was a prominent city in the antebellum years, a center of cotton planters and Mississippi River trade. Natchez is some 90 miles (140 km) southwest
Pierre Soulé (1,117 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
gain support for the US to annex Cuba to the United States. Some Southern planters wanted to expand their territory to the Caribbean and into Central America
R. P. Gaddum (390 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
at the age of 15 years. In 1935 he became the youngest Chairman of the Planters' Association of Ceylon, a position in which he served for three years.
Francis Cherry (governor) (937 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Francis Adams Cherry, Sr. (September 5, 1908 – July 15, 1965), was the 35th governor of Arkansas, elected as a Democrat for a single two-year term from
James M. Garnett (283 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
James Mercer Garnett (June 8, 1770 – April 23, 1843) was a nineteenth-century politician and planter from Virginia. He was the brother of Robert S. Garnett
Mine Planter Service (U.S. Army) (1,763 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
1919 to bring the fleet up to twenty planters in 1920. A massive Army reduction reduced that fleet to seven planters and one cable ship, named Joseph Henry
Arthur Pendleton Mason (766 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arthur "Pen" Pendleton Mason (11 December 1835–22 April 1893) was a lieutenant colonel in the Confederate States Army serving during the American Civil
Kelani Valley Club (953 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in 1884 by British planters in the region. The Kelani Valley Club was established in 1884, by low-country Kelani Valley Planters who were mainly European
Robert Page (Virginia politician) (158 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robert Page (February 4, 1765 – December 8, 1840) was a United States Representative from Virginia. Born at North End, Gloucester County (now Mathews County)
Solomon W. Downs (214 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Solomon Weathersbee Downs (1801 – August 14, 1854) was a United States Senator from Louisiana. Born in Montgomery County, Tennessee, he pursued classical
George Mason I (710 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Mason I (5 June 1629 – 1686) was the American progenitor of the prominent American landholding and political Mason family. Mason was the great-grandfather
Bob Glenalvin (57 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert J. Glenalvin (born Edward A. Dowling on January 17, 1867 in Indianapolis, Indiana, died March 24, 1944 in Detroit, Michigan) was a second baseman
Wade Hampton I (604 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Wade Hampton (1752 – February 4, 1835) was an American soldier, politician, two-term U.S. Congressman, and may have been the wealthiest planter and one
John S. Barbour (657 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Strode Barbour Sr. (August 8, 1790 – January 12, 1855) was a nineteenth-century politician and lawyer from Virginia. He was the father of John Strode
Gamini Jayawickrama Perera (204 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mallawa Arachchige Gamini Jayawickrama Perera, MP, is a Sri Lankan politician and a member of the 15th Parliament of Sri Lanka representing Kurunegala
Coronelism (222 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
machines of the countryside enabled agrarian oligarchs, especially coffee planters in the dominant state of São Paulo to dominate state structures to their
Tree planting (6,937 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
common, with experienced planters planting upwards of 5000 trees a day. Numbers as high as 7500 a day have been recorded. Planters typically work 8–11 hours
John Meredith Bass (460 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
John Meredith Bass (January 19, 1804– March 14, 1878) was an American banker, planter and Whig politician. He served as the Mayor of Nashville, Tennessee
Leonidas Polk (3,790 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Leonidas Polk (April 10, 1806 – June 14, 1864) was a planter in Maury County, Tennessee, USA, and a second cousin of President James K. Polk. He was bishop
Henry Marshall (politician) (424 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Henry Marshall (December 28, 1805 – July 13, 1864) was an American politician who served as a Deputy from Louisiana to the Provisional Congress of the
John Selden Roane (565 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Selden Roane (January 8, 1817 – April 7, 1867) was an American politician who served as the fourth Governor of Arkansas from 1849 to 1852. Prior to
Duncan F. Kenner (592 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
fields to the mill. He served as the President of the Louisiana Sugar Planters Association. He started his political career by working for John Slidell
History of Equatorial Guinea (3,073 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from the neighbouring Portuguese islands: escaped slaves and prospective planters. Although a few of the Fernandinos were Catholic and Spanish-speaking,
John Meredith Bass (460 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
John Meredith Bass (January 19, 1804– March 14, 1878) was an American banker, planter and Whig politician. He served as the Mayor of Nashville, Tennessee
Henry Marshall (politician) (424 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Henry Marshall (December 28, 1805 – July 13, 1864) was an American politician who served as a Deputy from Louisiana to the Provisional Congress of the
World Cotton Centennial (569 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cotton Exchange, the idea for the fair was first advanced by the Cotton Planters Association. The name "World Cotton Centennial" referred to the earliest-surviving
John Selden Roane (565 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Selden Roane (January 8, 1817 – April 7, 1867) was an American politician who served as the fourth Governor of Arkansas from 1849 to 1852. Prior to
Lawrence Augustine Washington (180 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lawrence Augustine Washington (April 11, 1774 - February 15, 1824)[citation needed] was a nephew of United States President George Washington and son of
Plymouth Company (206 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
I of England. It was a company of Knights, merchants, adventurers, and planters of the cities of Bristol, Exeter and Plymouth. Its purpose was establishing
71 South Wacker (360 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
fountains, lining the modern lobby to lush green grass in raised curved stone planters on the building's south side. 71 South Wacker also contains art panels
Murrells Inlet, South Carolina (1,883 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1800s. The rice planters were also active in the establishment of social, educational, and religious organizations, including the Planters Club, the Winyah
Panic of 1837 (3,060 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
throughout 1843. Several planters in Mississippi had spent much of their money in advance, leading to the complete bankruptcy of many planters. By 1839, many of
George W. Johnson (governor) (1,682 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
George Washington Johnson (May 27, 1811 – April 8, 1862) was the first Confederate governor of Kentucky. A lawyer-turned-farmer from Scott County, Kentucky
Henry M. Hyams (475 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Henry M. Hyams (March 4, 1806 – June 25, 1875) was an American lawyer, planter and Democratic politician. He served as the 7th Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana
Chittagong Tea Auction (405 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Unity Brokers, Produce Brokers, K.S. Brokers, Progressive Brokers and Planters Brokers. Among these seven tea brokers, National Broker and Purba Bangla
John A. Wharton (547 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Austin Wharton (July 23, 1828 – April 6, 1865) was a lawyer, plantation owner, and Confederate general during the American Civil War. He is considered
William Byrd III (382 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
have been the first major horse race in the New World, involving other planters Samuel Ogle, John Tayloe II, Francis Thornton, and Benjamin Tasker Jr.
Thomas Lee (Virginia colonist) (2,733 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Col. Thomas Lee (c. 1690–November 14, 1750) was a leading political figure of colonial Virginia. He was a member of the Lee family, a political dynasty
Richard Chichester Mason (714 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Chichester Mason (7 May 1793 – 22 July 1869) was a prominent physician practicing in Alexandria, Virginia. Mason was a grandson of George Mason
Thibodaux, Louisiana (2,707 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
under Union control, they ordered the slaves freed and to be paid wages. Planters in Thibodaux complained about having to negotiate labor contracts for the
History of Guyana (9,999 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Afro-Guyanese peasant class, however, threatened the planters' political power, inasmuch as the planters no longer held a near-monopoly on the colony's economic
Del Howard (118 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Elmer "Del" Howard (December 24, 1877 in Kenney, Illinois – December 24, 1956 in Seattle, Washington) was a Major League Baseball player from 1905
History of Tobago (6,641 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
slavery came in 1838; coupled with a lack of money to pay labourers, Tobago planters resorted to metayage, a form of sharecropping, which remained the dominant
Beverley Randolph Mason (742 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Beverley Randolph Mason (1 September 1834–22 April 1910) was a renowned educator and founder and principal of the Gunston Hall School for young women in
William Byrd I (608 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Byrd I (1652 – December 4, 1704) was a native of Shadwell, London, England. His father, John Bird (c. 1620–1677) was a London goldsmith with ancestral
Theodorick Bland of Westover (630 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Theodorick Bland (January 16, 1629 – April 23, 1671), also known as Theodorick Bland of Westover, was an English politician, merchant and planter. He was
Alexander W. Terrell (756 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander W. Terrell (November 23, 1827 – September 9, 1912) was an American judge, planter, Confederate veteran and diplomat. He served as the U. S. minister
Stephen Beckwith (101 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Stephen Beckwith (born 1623) was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He is probably the youth of eleven years old brought by Richard Pepper from
Afro-Barbadians (1,061 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
settlers as the wealthy planters pushed out the poor. The Irish as they were called were the Poor White Slaves and Planters that became the First Police
Chinese Brazilians (2,482 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2007. The first Chinese people came to Brazil in 1814, when Chinese tea planters were sent from Portugal to the Royal Botanical Garden in Rio de Janeiro
John Overton (judge) (621 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
John Overton (April 9, 1766 – April 12, 1833) was an American planter, advisor of Andrew Jackson, a judge at the Superior Court of Tennessee, a banker
Calypso music (2,605 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
rhythms can be traced back to West African Kaiso and the arrival of French planters and their slaves from the French Antilles in the 18th century. It is characterized
Joseph Eggleston (593 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Eggleston (November 24, 1754 – February 14, 1811) was an American planter, soldier, and politician from Amelia County, Virginia. He represented
William Temple Thomson Mason (968 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Temple Thomson Mason (July 24, 1782 – 1862) was a prominent Virginia farmer and businessman. William Temple Thomson Mason was born on July 24,
Isaac Johnson (485 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Isaac Johnson (November 1, 1803 – March 15, 1853) was a US politician and the 12th Governor of the state of Louisiana. Born on his father's plantation
History of Seychelles (4,404 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
masters was the colony's dependence on Mauritius. The other cloud on the planters' horizon was British anti-slavery legislation. In 1835, slavery was completely
Augustus Baldwin Longstreet (815 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Augustus Baldwin Longstreet (September 22, 1790 – July 9, 1870) was an American lawyer, minister, educator, and humorist, known for his book Georgia Scenes
Major General Wallace F. Randolph (ship) (961 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
West Virginia, and launched on 2 June 1942. She was one of 16 Army mine planters built in 1942 and 1943 for the U.S. Army Coast Artillery Corps, Mine Planter
Alfredo Montelibano Sr. (538 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the University of the Philippines. Montelíbano was President of the Planters Products Inc., Chamber of Agriculture and Natural Resources of the Philippines;
Amarillo Civic Center (262 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
It contains a Texas-accented floor, skylight ceiling, and fountains and planters. Two exhibit halls, the North which has 24,565 square feet (2,282 m2) of
William C. Houston (335 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Cannon Houston (March 17, 1852 – August 30, 1931) was an American politician and a member of the United States House of Representatives for the
Redeemers (3,663 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"carpetbaggers", and "scalawags". They generally were led by the rich former planters, businessmen, and professionals, and they dominated Southern politics in
Leroy Augustus Stafford (733 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leroy Augustus Stafford Sr. (April 13, 1822 – May 8, 1864), was a brigadier general in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. Leroy A. Stafford
George Steptoe Washington (1,277 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
George Steptoe Washington (August 17, 1771 - January 10, 1809) was a planter, militia officer and nephew of the first President of the United States George
Randal William McGavock (700 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Randal William McGavock (1826–1863) was an American lawyer, Democratic politician, Southern planter, and colonel in the Confederate States Army. He served
John Mason (planter) (1,093 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
John Mason (April 4, 1766 – March 19, 1849) was an early American merchant, banker, officer (armed forces), and planter. As a son of George Mason, a Founding
George William Fairfax (1,037 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
George William Fairfax (January 2, 1724 – April 3, 1787) was a member of the landed gentry of late colonial Virginia and a planter. A contemporary and
1892 Nebraska Bugeaters football team (903 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
history as the "Old Gold Knights", and was also sometimes known as the "Tree Planters", "Nebraskans", "The Rattlesnake Boys", "Red Stockings", "Antelopes" or
George William Fairfax (1,037 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
George William Fairfax (January 2, 1724 – April 3, 1787) was a member of the landed gentry of late colonial Virginia and a planter. A contemporary and
John Mason (planter) (1,093 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
John Mason (April 4, 1766 – March 19, 1849) was an early American merchant, banker, officer (armed forces), and planter. As a son of George Mason, a Founding
George Dent (416 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
George Dent (1756 – December 2, 1813) was an American planter and politician from Maryland who served in the House of Representatives from 1793 to 1801
Plantations of Leon County, Florida (427 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
cotton kingdom. From the 1820s through 1850s Leon County attracted cotton planters from Georgia, Virginia, Maryland, North and South Carolina, plus other
Matthew Locke (U.S. Congress) (480 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Matthew Locke (1730 – September 7, 1801) was a general during the American Revolutionary War, a wagon driver, and a U.S. Congressman from North Carolina
John Coffee (1,159 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
John R. Coffee (June 2, 1772 – July 7, 1833) was an American planter and state militia general in Tennessee. He commanded troops under General Andrew Jackson
George Steptoe Washington (1,277 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
George Steptoe Washington (August 17, 1771 - January 10, 1809) was a planter, militia officer and nephew of the first President of the United States George
Stono Rebellion (2,721 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
had become a "slave society," with slavery central to its economy. As planters had imported many slaves to satisfy the increased demand for labor, most
History of slavery in Maryland (7,286 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
rivers and other waterways that empty into the Chesapeake Bay. Maryland planters cultivated tobacco as the chief commodity crop, as the market was strong
William Fitzhugh (800 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
William Fitzhugh (August 24, 1741 – June 6, 1809) was an American planter and statesman who served as a delegate to the Continental Congress for Virginia
George Mason V (584 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
George Mason V of Lexington (April 30, 1753 – December 5, 1796) was a planter, businessman, and militia leader. Mason was the eldest son of United States
Ten Years' War (3,752 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
fight for independence from Spain. The uprising was led by Cuban-born planters and other wealthy natives. On October 10, 1868 sugar mill owner Carlos
Bluegrass region (843 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Revolutionary War (1775–1783). They migrated mostly from Virginia. By 1800 these planters noticed that horses grazed in the Bluegrass region were more hardy than
Natchez District (1,471 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
north to 32° 22′ north. By 1776, a sizable colony of English-speaking planters had settled there. The area nearest the Mississippi River was developed
Dave Rowe (baseball) (162 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
David Elwood "Dave" Rowe (October 9, 1854 – December 9, 1930) was an American Major League Baseball center fielder and manager from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Missouri Bootheel (2,664 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
invasion of the boll weevil, which ruined the cotton crop in Arkansas, planters moved in. They bought up the land for conversion to cotton commodity crops
Thomson Francis Mason (1,010 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Thomson Francis Mason (1785 – 21 December 1838) was a prominent jurist, lawyer, planter, councilman, judge, and the mayor of Alexandria, District of Columbia
Upper Canada Mall (332 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
north-south arrangement with two sunken sitting areas surrounded by brick planters on the lower level. Construction of the mall began in 1973. It opened in
James Fleming Fagan (836 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
James Fleming Fagan (March 1, 1828 – September 1, 1893) was a planter, public official, and a Major General in the Confederate States Army during the American
USS Picket (ACM-8) (565 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
mine planter USAMP-1 General Henry Knox as the first of the WW II period planters built for the U.S. Army Mine Planter Service. USAMP Knox was transferred
Thomas Fairfax, 9th Lord Fairfax of Cameron (468 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Fairfax, 9th Lord Fairfax of Cameron (1762–1846), was an American born Scottish peer, who along with his father, on 11 December 1799, was among
John Thornton Augustine Washington (1,374 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Thornton Augustine Washington (May 20, 1783 – October 9, 1841) was a prominent Virginia (now West Virginia) landowner, farmer, and statesman and a
York River State Park (300 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the site of a 17th and 18th century public tobacco warehouse where local planters stored their crops to be shipped to England. York River State Park opened
Seniors International Golf Championship (122 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Head Island, South Carolina at the Shipyard Golf Club (1982–1984), at the Planters Row Golf Club (1985), and at the Harbour Town GL (1986–1987). The purse
Black Patriot (1,020 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
This was in contrast to Black Loyalists, African Americans who left rebel planters and joined British forces. Many families escaped to take up the British
Josias Fendall (3,713 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Lord Baltimore's policy toward the Indians was adequate. Fendall gathered planters in Charles County, to discuss these rumors, which coupled with the fear
William Washington (1,964 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Washington (February 28, 1752 – March 6, 1810) was a cavalry officer of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, who held a
Bill Henry (baseball, born 1927) (411 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Rodman Henry (October 15, 1927 – April 11, 2014) was an American professional baseball player. A left-handed pitcher, he appeared in Major League
John Baptista Ashe (Continental Congress) (483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Baptist Ashe (1748 – November 27, 1802) was a U.S. Congressman, Continental Army officer, and tobacco grower from Halifax, North Carolina. He was
Pierce Butler (2,997 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Pierce Butler (July 11, 1744 – February 15, 1822) was a South Carolina rice planter, slaveholder, politician, an officer in the Revolutionary War, and
John Bolling (502 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Major John Bolling (January 27, 1676 – April 20, 1729) was a colonist, farmer and politician in the Virginia Colony. John Bolling was the son of Colonel
LeRoy Percy (1,638 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
education for blacks and worked to improve race relations by appealing to the planters' sense of noblesse oblige. Disenfranchisement of blacks made the Democratic
House of Assembly of Jamaica (204 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
elections to the Assembly, though they had to own property, so the white planters continued to dominate it. As a result of the Morant Bay Rebellion, the
Charles City County, Virginia (3,863 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cultivation and processing of this crop required intensive labor. The wealthier planters recruited indentured servants from the British Isles and Africa, and later
John K. Griffin (118 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John King Griffin (August 13, 1789 – August 1, 1841) was a U.S. Representative from South Carolina. Born near Clinton, South Carolina, Griffin pursued
Daniel Smith Donelson (874 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Daniel Smith Donelson (June 23, 1801 – April 17, 1863) was a Tennessee politician and soldier. The historic river-port of Fort Donelson was named for him
Inner Banks (1,255 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
both of which were labor-intensive in cultivation and processing. Major planters imported thousands of enslaved Africans for their work force through 1808
1894 Nebraska Bugeaters football team (871 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
history as the "Old Gold Knights", and was also sometimes known as the "Tree Planters", "Nebraskans", "The Rattlesnake Boys", "Red Stockings", "Antelopes" or
1897 Nebraska Bugeaters football team (853 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
history as the "Old Gold Knights", and was also sometimes known as the "Tree Planters", "Nebraskans", "The Rattlesnake Boys", "Red Stockings", "Antelopes" or
Caesar Antoine (1,137 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Caesar Carpentier Antoine (1836–1921) was a politician, the third of three African-American Republicans who were elected and served as the Lieutenant Governor
Elko, Georgia (513 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
prospered in the early 1900s as a local depot and trading center for cotton planters in southern Houston County. The district around Elko, called the Old Thirteenth
USCGC Acacia (WAGL-200) (1,046 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
of Saint Kitts and Nevis. List of ships of the United States Army#Mine Planters Shipping 1918, p. 35. Clay 2010, p. 1195. USCG. Helgason. Online resources
John Baptista Ashe (Continental Congress) (483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Baptist Ashe (1748 – November 27, 1802) was a U.S. Congressman, Continental Army officer, and tobacco grower from Halifax, North Carolina. He was
Elko, Georgia (513 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
prospered in the early 1900s as a local depot and trading center for cotton planters in southern Houston County. The district around Elko, called the Old Thirteenth
LeRoy Percy (1,638 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
education for blacks and worked to improve race relations by appealing to the planters' sense of noblesse oblige. Disenfranchisement of blacks made the Democratic
Wonder Woman: Amazonia (408 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
thus unable to succeed to the throne. A mysterious American named Jack Planters then appeared with a claim to be a distant royal cousin named "John Charles
Beer in Sri Lanka (522 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
began in Sri Lanka in 1881 primarily to meet the needs of the colonial tea planters. Despite the country's tropical weather, the preferred beer styles have
Bossier Press-Tribune (291 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1940, when as the weekly Bossier Tribune, it was in competition with the Planters Press. In 1945, T. L. Morris sold the Bossier Tribune to Larry Freeman
1894 Nebraska Bugeaters football team (871 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
history as the "Old Gold Knights", and was also sometimes known as the "Tree Planters", "Nebraskans", "The Rattlesnake Boys", "Red Stockings", "Antelopes" or
1897 Nebraska Bugeaters football team (853 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
history as the "Old Gold Knights", and was also sometimes known as the "Tree Planters", "Nebraskans", "The Rattlesnake Boys", "Red Stockings", "Antelopes" or
Sextus Barbour (572 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Dr. Sextus Barbour (July 26, 1813 – December 20, 1848) was a prominent American physician and planter. As the son of Philip Pendleton Barbour (May 25,
Robert E. Lee Jr. (794 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Edward "Rob" Lee Jr. (October 27, 1843 – October 19, 1914) was one of seven children of Confederate General Robert E. Lee and Mary Anna Randolph
Samuel Gibbs French (859 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Gibbs French (November 22, 1818 – April 20, 1910) was an officer in the U.S. Army, wealthy planter, author, and a major general in the Confederate
Stephen D. Lee (3,110 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lieutenant-General Stephen Dill Lee (September 22, 1833 – May 28, 1908) was an American politician who served as the first president of Mississippi State
Fort Braden, Florida (360 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Braden was south of the cotton rich Red Hills Region, it had successful planters Hugh Black, H.H. Black, P.B. Chanlers, John Gray, Joseph Haines, C. Gray
1899 Nebraska Bugeaters football team (874 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
history as the "Old Gold Knights", and was also sometimes known as the "Tree Planters", "Nebraskans", "The Rattlesnake Boys", "Red Stockings", "Antelopes" or
Randolph Jefferson (3,092 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Randolph Jefferson (October 1, 1755 – August 7, 1815) was the younger brother of Thomas Jefferson, the only male sibling to survive infancy. He was a planter
Domestic slave trade (2,258 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Deep South in the 19th century. Some people already established as planters took droves of slaves with them when they moved. Others bought slaves from
Plain Folk of the Old South (2,113 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
shortages increased the economic divide between planters and yeoman farmers; nevertheless, some planters took seriously their paternalistic obligations
Landon Carter (426 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Col. Landon Carter, I (August 18, 1710 – December 22, 1778) was an American planter from Lancaster County, Virginia, best known for his account of colonial
James Eastland (6,215 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Nigra professional men, more businessmen, we have substantial Nigra cotton planters. In fact, they have made more progress in the south than in the north.
George Washington Parke Custis (3,970 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Washington Parke Custis (April 30, 1781 – October 10, 1857) was a Virginia plantation owner, antiquarian, author, and playwright. The grandson of
Charles Johnson (North Carolina politician) (237 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Charles Johnson (1752?–July 23, 1802) was a Congressional representative from North Carolina. Johnson was born in Scotland; engaged as a planter; elected
Garden ornament (258 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
outdoor sculpture found objects such as recycled bowling balls, toilet planters, antique farm equipment kinetic sculpture masks obelisks renewable energy
Ceylon Tea Museum (322 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
decade before it was refurbished in 2001 by the Sri Lanka Tea Board and the Planters’ Association of Sri Lanka. The museum contains exhibits on tea pioneers
Munnar (5,502 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
opened up Talliar with coffee for the Turners, but he taught his fellow planters in the High Range road tracing, draining and general thottam work. He also
Crestar Bank (474 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
as State Planters Bank Of Commerce And Trusts on December 8, 1865 in Richmond. In 1969, it was renamed United Virginia Bank/State Planters. It reorganized
Saint-Domingue (4,341 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Domingue. In 1758, after a failed plot to poison the drinking water of the planters, he was captured and burned alive at the public square in Cap-Français
Thomas Monteagle Bayly (299 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Monteagle Bayly (March 26, 1775 – January 7, 1834) was an eighteenth and nineteenth century politician, lawyer and planter from Virginia. He was
Étienne de Boré (535 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
rule. His innovation made sugar cane profitable as a commodity crop and planters began to cultivate it in quantity. He owned a large plantation upriver
Stephen Duncan (1,170 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
had business interests. Ultimately, Duncan was what many of the northern planters from this time aspired to be, and was essential in perpetuating the connection
Black Patch Tobacco Wars (4,047 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and the Dark Tobacco District Planters' Protective Association of Kentucky and Tennessee (PPA). This association of planters formed September 24, 1904 in
Francis White (Virginia) (2,060 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Francis White (1761 – October 6, 1826) was a distinguished early American lawyer and politician in what was then the U.S. state of Virginia (now West Virginia)
Frank O'Rourke (baseball) (196 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
James Francis O'Rourke (November 28, 1893 – May 14, 1986) was a Canadian professional baseball infielder. He played in Major League Baseball for the Boston
Kandy Garden Club (430 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
which was established in 1878 for the exclusive use by British coffee planters to play tennis. It is one of the oldest operating sports clubs in the country
Thomas J. Wertenbaker (356 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
followed by Virginia Under the Stuarts (1914), and his master work, The Planters of Colonial Virginia (1922). In 1910, Princeton President Woodrow Wilson
Joseph McDowell Jr. (482 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph "Quaker Meadows" McDowell Jr. (8 March 1756 – 5 February 1801) was an American planter, soldier, and statesman from North Carolina. He was known
Mann Page (379 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Mann Page (1749–1781), sometimes referred to as Mann Page, III, was an American lawyer and planter from Spotsylvania County, Virginia and a delegate for
Thomas Moore (South Carolina congressman) (214 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Thomas Moore (1759 – July 11, 1822) was a member of the United States House of Representatives and planter from South Carolina. Born in Spartanburg District
Al Atkinson (baseball) (443 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Albert Wright Atkinson (March 9, 1861 – June 17, 1952) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher who played three seasons; one in the Union Association
Elisha I. Winter (186 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elisha I. Winter (July 15, 1781 – June 30, 1849) was a U.S. Representative from New York. Born in New York City on July 15, 1781, in 1806 Winter moved
Francis Walker (Virginia) (248 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Francis Walker (June 22, 1764 – March 1806) was an American planter and politician from Albemarle County, Virginia. He was member of the Virginia House
Tambun (229 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
pomelo produce, which is sought after by locals and tourists alike. Many planters were Hakkas from southern China. The fruit was originally brought in from
Ferdinando Fairfax (579 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ferdinando Fairfax (born in 1766 at Shannon Hill, Jefferson County, Virginia (now West Virginia); died on 24 September 1820 at Mount Eagle, Fairfax County
Port Gibson, Mississippi (1,685 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
develop cotton plantations in the area after Indian Removal of the 1830s, planters in the state imported thousands of African-American slaves from the Upper
Allen Doyle (754 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mid-Amateur, Rice Planters Amateur 1989 Sunnehanna Amateur, Georgia Mid-Amateur 1990 Sunnehanna Amateur, Georgia Amateur, Rice Planters Amateur 1991 Cardinal
Zephaniah Kingsley (4,392 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Two of his daughters stayed in Florida, as they had married local white planters. The others went with him to a plantation named Mayorasgo de Koka, which
John Fowler (politician) (725 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
John Fowler (April 27, 1756 – August 22, 1840), sometimes referred to as Captain John Fowler, was a planter and early American political leader in Virginia
Charles Hooks (169 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Hooks (February 20, 1768 – October 18, 1843) was a United States Representative from North Carolina; born in Bertie County, North Carolina, February
Edward M. House (2,787 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Mandell House (July 26, 1858 – March 28, 1938) was an American diplomat, and an advisor to President Woodrow Wilson. He was known by the nickname
List of United States Supreme Court cases, volume 83 (86 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Collector v. Stark 83 U.S. 240 Humphrey v. Pegues 83 U.S. 244 Dickinson v. The Planters' Bank 83 U.S. 250 1861 Insurance Company v. Comstock 83 U.S. 258 Carpenter
1895 Nebraska Bugeaters football team (991 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
history as the "Old Gold Knights", and was also sometimes known as the "Tree Planters", "Nebraskans", "The Rattlesnake Boys", "Red Stockings", "Antelopes" or
1893 Nebraska Bugeaters football team (982 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
history as the "Old Gold Knights", and was also sometimes known as the "Tree Planters", "Nebraskans", "The Rattlesnake Boys", "Red Stockings", "Antelopes" or
Lakota people (3,738 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the End of the Camp Circle) Mnikȟówožu (Miniconjou, "Plant Near Water", Planters by the Water) Sihásapa ("Blackfeet, or Blackfoot") Oóhenuŋpa (Two Kettles)
Planter, Georgia (109 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
account of its location within an agricultural district. A variant name is "Planters". U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Planter "Post
Robert Bolling (1,063 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Colonel Robert Bolling (December 26, 1646 – July 17, 1709), sometimes called Robert Bolling, Sr., after he gave a son his own name, was a wealthy early
The Night Riders (1,342 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
planters of western Kentucky and the neighboring counties of West Tennessee formed the Dark Fired Tobacco District, or Black Patch District Planters'
Charles Lynch (judge) (908 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
financial assistance of the elder Clark, the Lynches themselves became planters of tobacco on a large scale, farming well over 7,000 acres of Virginia
Robert Beverley Jr. (514 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Beverley Jr. (c.1667—April 21, 1722) was a historian of early colonial Virginia, as well as a planter and political figure. He was born in Jamestown
Tariff of 1857 (408 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
manufacturers, and railroad interests; and spokesmen for southern farmers and planters. Opposition came largely from two economic groups: the iron manufacturers
Henry Lee I (391 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Capt. Henry Lee I (1691–1747) was a prominent Virginia colonist, planter, soldier, and politician, brother of Governor Thomas Lee, grandfather of Revolutionary
George Troup (999 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Destiny policies and a supporter of native Indian removal, Troup was born to planters and supported slavery throughout his career. Later in his life, he was
Thomas Hinde (1,992 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Doctor Thomas Hinde (July 10, 1737 – September 28, 1828) was Northern Kentucky's first physician, a member of the British Royal Navy, an American Revolutionary
Alexander H. Stephens (4,757 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander Hamilton Stephens (February 11, 1812 – March 4, 1883) was a Confederate politician who served as the vice president of the Confederate States
William Hicks Jackson (1,179 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Hicks "Red" Jackson (October 1, 1835 – March 30, 1903) was a career United States Army officer who graduated from West Point. After serving briefly
1615 in Ireland (230 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Brian Crossagh, Rory O'Cahan and Alexander McDonald to massacre Ulster planters and of the arrest of many conspirators. April 25 – convocation of the Church
Choctaw in the American Civil War (4,522 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Spann organized the Mississippi Choctaw. They were both wealthy white planters and had experience with the Indians from Mississippi. The Choctaw Nation
Charminster (226 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
House, was the place of origin of Richard Norman and family, one of the Planters of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in America, who arrived there in ca. 1626
Colonial period of South Carolina (3,942 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
environment. The Black population of the Lowcountry was dominated by wealthy planters of English descent and indentured servants from southern and western England
Harman Blennerhassett (760 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Harman Blennerhassett (8 October 1765 – 2 February 1831) was an Anglo-Irish lawyer and politician. He was born in Hampshire, England, to Conway Blennerhassett
Thomas Barbour (Virginia politician) (212 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Barbour (1735 – May 16, 1825) was a prominent landowner and member of the Virginia House of Burgesses. Thomas Barbour was born in 1735 in Orange
Eli Lilly (4,690 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eli Lilly (July 8, 1838 – June 6, 1898) was an American soldier, pharmacist, chemist, and businessman who founded the Eli Lilly and Company pharmaceutical
Bill Hart (pitcher) (56 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Franklin Hart (July 19, 1865 – September 19, 1936) was a professional baseball player who played pitcher in the Major Leagues from 1886 to 1901
Lauritz Sand (933 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lauritz Sand (1 October 1879 – 17 December 1956) was a Norwegian topographer, military officer in the Dutch army, estate owner in the Dutch East Indies
Daniel Govan (757 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Daniel Chevilette Govan (July 4, 1829 – March 12, 1911) was an American miner, planter, and soldier. He served as a Confederate general during the American
Isaac Thomas (289 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Isaac Thomas (4 November 1784 – 2 February 1859), was an American politician representing Tennessee in the United States House of Representatives. Thomas
Scott's Addition Historic District (426 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Biscuit Factory (Nabisco) (1923), G. F. O'Connell House (1920), State Planters Bank & Trust Company (1948), Chevrolet Parts Depot (General Motors Corporation)
Alexander McGillivray (2,190 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander McGillivray, also known as Hoboi-Hili-Miko (December 15, 1750 – February 17, 1793), was a Muscogee (Creek) leader. The son of a Muscogee mother
Edward Long (1,126 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Long (23 August 1734 – 13 March 1813) was a Jamaican-born British colonial administrator and historian, and author of a highly controversial work
Tom Dolan (baseball) (43 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas J. Dolan (January 10, 1855 – January 16, 1913) was a player in Major League Baseball. Dolan was primarily a catcher, but also played outfield, third
Carter Bassett Harrison (553 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rep. Carter Bassett Harrison (c.1756—April 18, 1808) was a politician from the U.S. state of Virginia. He was the son of Benjamin Harrison V, a member
Isaac Huger (621 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Isaac Huger (March 19, 1743 – October 17, 1797) was a planter and Continental Army general during the American Revolutionary War. Isaac Huger was born
Nathaniel Haies (200 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Norwalke Indians in 1655. It took until March 30, 1686 before the planters at Norwalk obtained a Royal Charter from King James II. On this patent
Henry Lee II (830 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Col. Henry Lee II (1730–1787) of Alexandria, Westmoreland, Virginia Colony, was an American planter, soldier, and politician, the father of Henry "Light-Horse
List of United States Supreme Court cases, volume 161 (57 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tennessee City of Memphis Same 161 U.S. 134 1896 Shelby County v. Union Planters' Bank 161 U.S. 149 1896 Mercantile Bank v. State of Tennessee City of Memphis
The Conversation (Matisse) (301 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
recently been introduced to Europe from India, where they were worn by tea planters, and Matisse habitually thereafter wore pajamas as his studio working clothes
South Sea Islanders (750 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
insulting reminder of their ancestors' exploitation at the hands of white planters. With time, owing to intermarriage, many Australian South Sea Islanders
Colony of Jamaica (10,571 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the planter oligarchy out of office. After the duke's death in 1688, the planters, who had fled Jamaica to London, succeeded in lobbying James II to order
Hashima-class cable layer (184 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from laying communications cables, these ships were also designed as mine planters, for the installation of controlled mines in coastal fortifications. Project
John Doby Kennedy (776 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Doby Kennedy (January 5, 1840 – April 14, 1896) was a general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War, as well as a post-war
South Sea Islanders (750 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
insulting reminder of their ancestors' exploitation at the hands of white planters. With time, owing to intermarriage, many Australian South Sea Islanders
Jackson County, Florida (2,438 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was adversely affected by the international decline in the market. White planters resisted dealing with freedmen as free workers. Insurgent Confederate veterans
Sea Islands (611 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
After 18th-century European-American settlement of Georgia and Florida, planters imported enslaved Africans as laborers. Many were used to work the labor-intensive
USS Obstructor (869 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
USS Obstructor (ACM-7) was a Chimo-class minelayer in the United States Navy during World War II. Built by the Marietta Manufacturing Company in Point
Treatment of slaves in the United States (14,221 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
more often the planters' sons who took advantage of slave women before their legal marriages to white women, than did the senior planters. Many female slaves
Robert White (Virginia physician) (1,653 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Robert White (1688 – 1752) was an early American physician, military officer, pioneer, and planter in the Colony of Virginia. White was born in Scotland
History of Alabama (10,667 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Americans in the domestic slave trade. In antebellum Alabama, wealthy planters created large cotton plantations which depended on the labor of enslaved
Elaine, Arkansas (1,134 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sharecroppers were attempting to organize a farmers' union, which the planters resisted. Phillips County was developed in the antebellum years for cotton
National Register of Historic Places listings in Robeson County, North Carolina (253 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
764444; -79.179444 (Philadelphus Presbyterian Church) Philadelphus 16 Planters Building More images November 3, 1987 (#87001913) 308 N. Chestnut St. 34°37′09″N
Reciprocity Treaty of 1875 (1,118 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
by Americans in sugarcane plantations in Hawaii. For decades, the sugar planters in Hawaii had been economically hampered by United States import taxes
Tariff of 1789 (2,217 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Northern manufacturers favored high duties to protect industry; Southern planters desired a low tariff that would foster cheap consumer imports. Ultimately
Bland, Florida (138 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
community in northwestern Alachua County, Florida, United States. Cotton planters from Georgia and South Carolina settled in the area in the 1840s. The community
Sugar mills in Fiji (507 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
required high capital outlay but after a slump in cotton prices in 1870, the planters turned to sugar. In an effort to promote the production of sugar in Fiji
Howardsville, Albemarle County, Virginia (1,936 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
trading posts all along the rivers of Virginia. The store sold goods to the planters in exchange for their tobacco crops and there was a large, secure warehouse
Thomas Lewis (Virginia) (905 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Lewis (April 27, 1718 – January 31, 1790) was an Irish-American surveyor, lawyer, and a pioneer of early Virginia. He was a signatory to the Fairfax
Alexander White (Virginia politician) (2,872 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Alexander White (1738 – September 19, 1804) was a distinguished early American lawyer and politician in the present-day U.S. states of Virginia and West
Afro-Kittitians and Nevisians (2,951 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the later part of 17th century”. As the clearing work neared completion, planters tried to combat the high death rate by initiating a one-year “seasoning
Bartholomew Dandridge (304 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Harris, M. (2006). Old New Kent County [Virginia]: Some Account of the Planters, Plantations, and Places. Genealogical.com. p. 82. ISBN 978-0-8063-5293-0
1896 Nebraska Bugeaters football team (1,084 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
history as the "Old Gold Knights", and was also sometimes known as the "Tree Planters", "Nebraskans", "The Rattlesnake Boys", "Red Stockings", "Antelopes" or
History of Arkansas (12,843 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
were very low in all Southern states controlled by planters, and Arkansas was no exception. Most planters did not carry a lot of cash and were usually indebted
Roof garden (1,776 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
additional outdoor living space for the building's residents. It may include planters, plants, dining and lounging furniture, outdoor structures such as pergolas
Gullah (5,922 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
domesticated in the inland delta of the Upper Niger River. Once British colonial planters in the American South discovered that African rice would grow in that region
Ancient planter (1,249 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"ancient planters", or provide information which shows that a tract of land must have been originally granted under the terms applying to Ancient Planters. Additional
List of United States Supreme Court cases, volume 189 (57 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Stephen P Condon 189 U.S. 64 1903 Union Planters' Bank of Memphis v. City of Memphis H No 67 Union Planters' Bank of Memphis 189 U.S. 71 1903 Mexican
1943 Saint Kitts-Nevis-Anguilla general election (201 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
League won all the elected seats, defeating an alliance of merchants and planters nominated by the Agricultural and Commercial Society. The Legislative Council
Indian Institute of Spices Research (1,515 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Research. IISR was formed with a five-fold mandate : Target group : Farmers & Planters Mandate : To extend services and technologies to conserve genetic resources
War of the Regulation (3,664 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
inland section of the colonies had once been predominantly composed of planters with an agricultural economy. Merchants and lawyers began to move west
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (3,359 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
both elections. Pinckney was born into a powerful family of aristocratic planters. He practiced law for several years and was elected to the colonial legislature
Jack Hammond (100 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Walter Charles "Jack" Hammond (February 26, 1891 – March 4, 1942), nicknamed "Wobby", was an American second baseman in Major League Baseball who played
List of Sri Lankan non-career Permanent Secretaries (885 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of Sri Lankan non-career Permanent Secretaries; they are from different professions. The list includes doctors, engineers, journalists,
George Mathews (soldier) (5,140 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
had filled leadership positions for his rebellion with wealthy Spanish planters and businessmen. Still, he had not found enough local interest to fill
Dutch Brazil (3,713 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
production, amidst rising competition from British, French, and Dutch planters in the Caribbean. The Habsburg family had ruled the Low Countries from
History of Suriname (1,779 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
for sugar cultivation. With abolition in the late nineteenth century, planters sought labor from China, Madeira, India, and Indonesia, which was also
Tea production in Sri Lanka (6,765 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the plantations on the island were dedicated to producing coffee beans. Planters experimented with cocoa and cinchona as alternative crops but failed due
Belgian Canadians (533 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Encyclopedia of Canada's peoples (1999) pp 257-69 Cornelius J. Jaenen, Promoters, Planters, and Pioneers: The Course and Context of Belgian Settlement in Western
Belgian Canadians (533 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Encyclopedia of Canada's peoples (1999) pp 257-69 Cornelius J. Jaenen, Promoters, Planters, and Pioneers: The Course and Context of Belgian Settlement in Western
John Joseph Murphy Memorial Higher Secondary School (309 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
J. Murphy (1872 - 1957), one of the most successful individual British planters in India. The school is situated in Yendayar, near the eastern border of
William Claiborne (2,978 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Claiborne also, spelled Cleyburne (c. 1600 – c. 1677) was an English pioneer, surveyor, and an early settler in the colonies/provinces of Virginia
Woodville, Mississippi (1,620 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Upper South. Merchants served the planters' families and freedmen after the Civil War. To get cotton to market, planters supported construction of the West
John Dandridge (522 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Col. John Dandridge Jr. of Chestnut Grove (13/14 July 1700 – 31 August 1756) was a distinguished colonel, planter, politician, and Clerk of the Courts
Elkanah Greer (516 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Elkanah Brackin (or Bracken) Greer (October 11, 1825 – March 25, 1877) was an antebellum cotton planter, merchant, and then a general in the Confederate
Aylmer Francis Robinson (565 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aylmer Francis Robinson (1888–1967) was an owner of a large ranch that encompassed an island in the Hawaiian Islands. Aylmer Francis Robinson was born
William Houstoun (lawyer) (482 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
William Houstoun, also spelled Houston, (/ˈhaʊstən/ HOW-stən) (c. 1755 – March 17, 1813) was an American planter, lawyer and statesman. He served the Province
Alexander Boyd (county solicitor) (520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
suspect it was arson to destroy such records of suits by freedmen against planters. On the night of Boyd's murder, thirty masked, armed, and costumed Klansmen
Samuel Mudd (4,231 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Alexander Mudd Sr. (December 20, 1833 – January 10, 1883) was an American physician who was imprisoned for conspiring with John Wilkes Booth in
1908 Fijian general election (132 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from three constituencies; Levuka (one seat), Suva (two seats) and a "Planters" constituency covering the rest of the colony (three seats). Voting was
Tea production in Sri Lanka (6,765 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the plantations on the island were dedicated to producing coffee beans. Planters experimented with cocoa and cinchona as alternative crops but failed due
Will Foley (93 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Brown Foley (November 15, 1855 – November 12, 1916) was a Major League Baseball third baseman. He played all or part of seven seasons in the majors
Vallisneria (694 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Vallisneria has arched stems which cross over small obstacles and develop small planters at their nodes. Various strains of Vallisneria are commonly kept in tropical
California pottery (2,087 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Beach 1940s Art ware Affiliated Craftsmen's Studio Los Angeles unknown Planters Alhamhra Kilns, Inc. Alhambra 1920s- Floor and roof tile Alberhill Coal
Cayenne (Dutch colony) (416 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
settlement initiated by David Cohen Nassy, consisting mainly of Jewish planters who had to leave Dutch Brazil upon its recapture by Portugal. Nassy received
Charles Carroll of Annapolis (772 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Maryland. Doubleday Doran & Co. Hoffman, Ronald, Princes of Ireland, Planters of Maryland: A Carroll Saga, 1500–1782 Retrieved August 9, 2010 Official
William Randolph II (647 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
William Randolph II (November 1681—October 19, 1741), also known as William Randolph Jr. or Councillor Randolph, was an American planter and politician
USS Barbican (1,056 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
USS Barbican (ACM-5) was a Chimo-class minelayer in the United States Navy. Barbican was later commissioned in U.S. Coast Guard as USCGC Ivy (WLB / WAGL-329)
Black Codes (United States) (9,860 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
legislature for each case of manumission. This sharply reduced the incidence of planters freeing slaves. All the slave states passed anti-miscegenation laws, banning
Lawrence Lewis (1767–1839) (449 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Lawrence Lewis (April 4, 1767 – November 20, 1839) was a nephew of George Washington who married Nelly Custis, a granddaughter of Martha Washington. He
Aubrey Robinson (Hawaii) (723 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Aubrey Robinson (1853–1936) was an owner of a sugarcane plantation and a ranch consisting of an entire island in the Hawaiian Islands. Aubrey Robinson
Elliot D. Coleman (1,215 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Times-Picayune. Retrieved July 20, 2013. "James Matthew Reonas, Once Proud Princes: Planters and Plantation Culture in Louisiana's Northeast Delta, From the First World
Golaghat (7,723 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to name a few. The headquarters of Assam Valley Tea Planters' Association (now Assam Tea Planters Association) was also based in Golaghat. Set up in 1941
Joshua Fry Speed (2,781 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joshua Fry Speed (November 14, 1814 – May 29, 1882) was a close friend of Abraham Lincoln from his days in Springfield, Illinois, where Speed was a partner
Otto Herman Swezey (230 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Perkinsiella saccharicida in Hawaii working with the Hawaiian sugar planters. After retirement in 1933 he worked at the Bernice P. Bishop Museum. Swezey
William Joel Bryan (499 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
William Joel Bryan (December 14, 1815 – March 3, 1903) was a Texas soldier and planter. William Joel Bryan was born on December 14, 1815 at Hazel Run in
John Flynn (baseball) (58 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Anthony Flynn (1883–1935) was a first baseman in Major League Baseball between 1910 and 1912. He attended the College of the Holy Cross and played
Adelicia Acklen (787 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Adelicia Hayes Franklin Acklen Cheatham (March 15, 1817 – May 4, 1887), best known as Adelicia Acklen, became the wealthiest woman in Tennessee and a plantation
Joseph Calhoun (233 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Calhoun (October 22, 1750 – April 14, 1817) was a Republican member of the South Carolina House of Representatives (1804–1805) and represented South
Mickey Devine (167 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Patrick "Mickey" Devine (May 9, 1892 – October 1, 1937) was a backup catcher in Major League Baseball who played for three different teams between
Warrenton, North Carolina (709 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
a center for trade and entertainment for the region's planters and their slaves. The planters and merchants built large homes in the town, and kept slaves
History of Georgia (U.S. state) (14,560 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
were a time of growth after Indian Removal, and economic prosperity for planters. The new cotton gin, enabled the cultivation and processing of short-staple
David Stuart (Virginia politician) (881 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
David Stuart (August 3, 1753 – October 1814) was a relation and correspondent of George Washington. When Washington became President of the United States
George Mason (13,320 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rappahannock rivers. Most settlement took place near the rivers, through which planters could trade with the world. Thus, colonial Virginia initially developed
Parkway Plaza (629 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
not featured anywhere on the exterior of the mall; only large sloping planters that served to hide the loading docks of the various shops. The interior
Manipuri Pony (1,110 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
polo pony in use in Assam in the mid-nineteenth century when British tea planters first saw polo being played, and the height limits set for polo ponies
Little Dixie (Missouri) (1,791 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
production to it, while foregoing necessary food production. In addition, planters in "Outer Little Dixie" counties, such as Platte, Howard, Chariton and
Thomas C. Hindman (4,822 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas C. Hindman (born Thomas Carmichael Hindman, Jr.; January 28, 1828 – September 27, 1868) was a lawyer, United States House of Representative from
Richard Bland Lee (2,938 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Bland Lee (January 20, 1761 – March 12, 1827) was a planter, jurist, and politician from Fairfax County, Virginia. He was the son of Henry Lee
George Mathews (judge) (967 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
according to Lewis Gray's figures, placed them among the top 9% of sugar planters in the state in the 1850s. The Mathews owned slaves, and used their labor
Holly Bluff, Mississippi (556 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sharbrough family in 1877. Located on the Sunflower River, early delta cotton planters used the river to ship their cotton to Vicksburg and New Orleans. Holly
Jamaican Americans (2,455 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1850s. After slavery was abolished in the United States in 1865, American planters imported temporary workers, called "swallow migrants", to harvest crops
John Custis (454 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Custis IV (August 1678 – after 14 November 1749) was an North American Colonial British politician and a member of the Governor's Council in the British