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Longer titles found: Modern Paganism (view), Germanic paganism (view), Anglo-Saxon paganism (view), Slavic paganism (view), Sacred trees and groves in Germanic paganism and mythology (view), Abkhaz neopaganism (view), Celtic neopaganism (view), Semitic neopaganism (view), Celtic Reconstructionist Paganism (view), Gothic paganism (view), Finnish neopaganism (view), Secular paganism (view), Neopaganism in Australia (view), Christianity and paganism (view), Finnish paganism (view), Death in Norse paganism (view), Christianity and neopaganism (view), Neopaganism in the United States (view), Neopaganism in South Africa (view), Eclectic Paganism (view), Baltic neopaganism (view), Technopaganism (view), Neopaganism in Minnesota (view), Neo-paganism in the Republic of Ireland (view), Neopaganism in German-speaking Europe (view), Uralic neopaganism (view), Caucasian neopaganism (view), List of converts to Islam from paganism (view), List of converts to Christianity from paganism (view), List of people who converted to paganism (view), List of converts to Judaism from paganism (view), Neopaganism in Scandinavia (view), Restoration and tolerance of Paganism from Julian until Valens (view), Crypto-paganism (view), Rebirth in Germanic paganism (view), Witchcraft and Paganism in Australia (view), Skyclad (Neopaganism) (view), Anti-paganism policies of the early Byzantine Empire (view), Neopaganism in Latin Europe (view), Neopaganism in Hungary (view), Neo-paganism in Ireland (view)

searching for Paganism 162 found (3850 total)

alternate case: paganism

Obadiah (944 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Obadiah (/ˌoʊbəˈdaɪ.ə/; Hebrew: עֹבַדְיָה – ʿŌvaḏyāh or עֹבַדְיָהוּ – ʿŌvaḏyā́hū; "servant of the Lord") is a Biblical theophorical name, meaning "servant
Ergi (811 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ergi (noun) and argr (adjective) are two Old Norse terms of insult, denoting effeminacy or other unmanly behavior. Argr (also ragr) is "unmanly" and ergi
Horse worship (1,041 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Horse worship is a spiritual practice with archaeological evidence of its existence during the Iron Age and, in some places, as far back as the Bronze
Traditional Berber religion (3,087 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The traditional Berber religion is the ancient and native set of beliefs and deities adhered to by the Berbers (Amazigh autochthones) of North Africa.
Theodosius I (3,888 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
before Stilicho and Honorius in which Ambrose praised the suppression of paganism by Theodosius. Theodosius was finally buried in the Church of the Holy
Hulder (619 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A hulder (or huldra) is a seductive forest creature found in Scandinavian folklore. Her name derives from a root meaning "covered" or "secret". In Norwegian
Neo-fascism (6,208 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Neo-nationalism Neo-Nazism Northwest Territorial Imperative Nordic racial paganism/Odalism Paleoconservatism Paleolibertarianism Radical right Reactionary
Asenath (311 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Asenath (/ˈæsɪnæθ/, Hebrew: אָסְנַת, Modern: ʾAsənat, Tiberian: ʾĀsenaṯ) is a minor figure in the Book of Genesis. Her name is believed to derive from
John Lindow (364 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Lindow (born 1946) is a professor emeritus (University of California, Berkeley) specializing in Scandinavian medieval studies and folklore. Lindow's
Thyle (431 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A thyle (OE þyle, ON þulr) was a member of the court associated with Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon royalty and chieftains in the Early Middle Ages, whose
The Reckoning of Time (780 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Reckoning of Time (Latin: De temporum ratione) is an Anglo-Saxon era treatise written in Medieval Latin by the Northumbrian monk Bede in 725. The treatise
Rudolf Simek (353 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rudolf Simek (born 21 February 1954 in Eisenstadt, Burgenland) is an Austrian Germanist and philologist. Simek studied German literature, philosophy and
Ruth (biblical figure) (1,522 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Ruth (/ruːθ/; Hebrew: רוּת, Modern: Rūt, Tiberian: Rūṯ) is the person after whom the Book of Ruth is named. In the narrative, she is not an Israelite but
Place of worship (1,536 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Beyt Knesset ( Hebrew בית כנסת ) meaning house of assembly. hof – Norse Paganism Jinja – Shinto Gurdwara – Sikhism Daoguan – Taoism Fire temple - All Zoroastrian
Polemon II of Pontus (1,085 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Marcus Antonius Polemon Pythodoros, also known as Polemon II of Pontus and Polemon of Cilicia (Greek: Μάρκος Ἀντώνιος Πολέμων Πυθόδωρος; 12 BC/11 BC–74)
Wing, Buckinghamshire (993 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wing, known in antiquated times as Wyng, is a village and civil parish in Aylesbury Vale district in Buckinghamshire, England. The village is on the main
Scop (867 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A scop (/ʃɒp/ or /skɒp/) was a poet as represented in Old English poetry. The scop is the Old English counterpart of the Old Norse skald, with the important
Onkelos (632 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Onkelos (Hebrew: אֻנְקְלוֹס ’unqəlōs), possibly identical to Aquila of Sinope, was a Roman national who converted to Judaism in Tannaic times (c. 35–120
Sword of Freyr (283 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In Norse mythology, the sword belonging to Freyr, a Norse god associated with sunshine, summer and fair weather. Freyr's sword is depicted in Norse mythology
Mythology in France (2,415 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
French region began to change due to Roman influence. Traditional Celtic Paganism draws on the deities of the Celtic pantheon, an extensive grouping of gods
Emeth (964 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emeth (Hebrew אמת : "truth," "firmness," or "veracity") is a Calormene character from C. S. Lewis's book The Last Battle from The Chronicles of Narnia
Chalice (2,044 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Wiccan rituals. A chalice is also used in the Small Rite. Some forms of Neo-Paganism make use of chalices in their rituals as well. A chalice may be placed
Jethro (biblical figure) (1,884 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
In the Hebrew Bible, Jethro (/ˈdʒɛθroʊ/; Hebrew: יִתְרוֹ, Standard Yitro Tiberian Yiṯerô; "His Excellence/Posterity"; Arabic: شعيب Shuʿayb) was Moses'
The Black Knight (film) (1,423 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Black Knight is a 1954 Technicolor adventure film directed by Tay Garnett and starring Alan Ladd as the title character and Peter Cushing and Patrick
Troy Southgate (741 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"exploit a burgeoning counter culture of industrial heavy metal music, paganism, esotericism, occultism and Satanism that, it believes, holds the key to
Horse burial (2,160 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Horse burial is the practice of burying a horse as part of the ritual of human burial, and is found among many Indo-European peoples and others, including
Aquila of Sinope (1,065 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aquila (Hebrew: עֲקִילַס ‘áqīlas, fl. 130 AD) of Sinope (modern-day Sinop, Turkey; Latin: Aquila Ponticus) was a translator of the Hebrew Bible into Greek
Rahab (1,955 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rahab (/ˈreɪhæb/; Hebrew: רָחָב, Modern: Raẖav, Tiberian: Rāḥāḇ, "broad", "large", Arabic: رحاب, a vast space of a land) was, according to the Book of
Benjamin Thorpe (1,052 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Benjamin Thorpe (1782 – 19 July 1870) was an English scholar of Anglo-Saxon literature. In the early 1820s he worked as a banker in the House of Rothschild
Thursley (957 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thursley is a village and civil parish in southwest Surrey, west of the A3 between Milford and Hindhead. An associated hamlet is Bowlhead Green. To the
Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum (2,022 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
over the missions to Scandinavia, it also gives a report of the Norse paganism of the period. The existence of the work was forgotten in the later medieval
Thursley (957 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thursley is a village and civil parish in southwest Surrey, west of the A3 between Milford and Hindhead. An associated hamlet is Bowlhead Green. To the
Mount Odin (320 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
is named after Odin, the chief of the gods in Norse mythology and Norse paganism. Mount Odin has an impressive rocky south face that drops into the Weasel
Euhemerism (2,833 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
whom they call Zeus". Varro also wrote about the tomb of Zeus. Hostile to paganism, the early Christians, such as the Church Fathers, embraced euhemerism
Antoninus (philosopher) (240 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
described as exemplary. He and his disciples were strongly attached to paganism; but he is said to have been able to see that its end was near at hand
Pagan religions of Azerbaijan (1,319 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
be considered a second wave of paganism in Azerbaijan, but after Ghazan's adoption of Islam as state religion, paganism and shamanism dissolved quickly
Sophus Bugge (641 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elseus Sophus Bugge (5 January 1833 – 8 July 1907) was a Norwegian philologist and linguist. His scholarly work was directed to the study of runic inscriptions
Mead (4,362 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mead (/miːd/) is an alcoholic beverage created by fermenting honey with water, sometimes with various fruits, spices, grains, or hops. The alcoholic content
Renaissance humanism (3,053 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
& Renaissance Culture: Humanism". The Library of Congress. 2002-07-01 Paganism in the Renaissance, BBC Radio 4 discussion with Tom Healy, Charles Hope
Gender and religion (4,394 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
differing cultural experiences of gender. Both men and women who practiced paganism in ancient civilizations such as Rome and Greece worshiped male and female
Goðafoss (355 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Goðafoss is a waterfall in northern Iceland. It is located along the country's main ring road at the junction with the Sprengisandur highland road. The
Harrow on the Hill (1,816 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Harrow on the Hill is a locality and historic village in the borough of Harrow in Greater London, England. Independent boutiques and restaurants dot the
Pagan's Mind (784 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pagan's Mind is a progressive metal band from Skien, Norway. They have released five studio albums, and the current line-up only features original members
Sarras (210 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sarras aboard Solomon's ship, but they find the residents fallen back to paganism. The Grail knights restore the people's faith and preside over them benevolently
List of names of Odin (485 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Odin (Old Norse Óðinn) is a widely attested god in Germanic mythology. The god is referred to by numerous names and kenningar, particularly in the Old
Sarras (210 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sarras aboard Solomon's ship, but they find the residents fallen back to paganism. The Grail knights restore the people's faith and preside over them benevolently
Wye, Kent (1,697 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wye is an historic village in Kent, England, centred 12 miles (19 km) from Canterbury, and is also the main village in the civil parish of Wye with Hinxhill
Bog body (3,933 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A bog body is a human cadaver that has been naturally mummified in a peat bog. Such bodies, sometimes known as bog people, are both geographically and
History of the Lombards (875 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The History of the Lombards or the History of the Langobards (Latin: Historia Langobardorum) is the chief work by Paul the Deacon, written in the late
Palaestina Secunda (861 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Palæstina Secunda or Palaestina II was a Byzantine province from 390, until its conquest by the Muslim armies in 634–636. Palaestina Secunda, a part of
May Day (6,171 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
May Day is a public holiday usually celebrated on 1 May or the first Monday of May. It is an ancient festival of spring and a current traditional spring
Solomon and Saturn (1,284 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Solomon and Saturn is the generic name given to four Old English works, which present a dialogue of riddles between Solomon, the king of Israel, and Saturn
Shmaya (tanna) (771 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Shemaiah (Hebrew: שְׁמַעְיָה, also spelled Šəmaʿyāh; Koinē Greek: Σαμαίᾱς, Samaíās), or Shmaya in Modern Hebrew) was a rabbinic sage in the early pre-Mishnaic
Commentarii de Bello Gallico (3,543 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Commentāriī dē Bellō Gallicō (English: Commentaries on the Gallic War), also Bellum Gallicum (English: Gallic War), is Julius Caesar's firsthand account
Religious policies of Constantine the Great (7,457 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and denounces paganism as idolatry and superstition in the same document. Constantine and his contemporary Christians did not treat paganism as a living
A Description of the Northern Peoples (145 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Historia de Gentibus Septentrionalibus was a monumental work by Olaus Magnus on the Nordic countries, printed in Rome 1555. It was a work which long remained
Fides (deity) (492 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
(Latin: Fidēs) was the goddess of trust and bona fides (good faith) in Roman paganism. She was one of the original virtues to be considered an actual religious
Völsa þáttr (510 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vǫlsa þáttr is a short story which is only extant in the Flateyjarbók codex, where it is found in a chapter of Óláfs saga helga. It is probably from the
Procopius (4,597 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Procopius of Caesarea (Greek: Προκόπιος ὁ Καισαρεύς Prokópios ho Kaisareús; Latin: Procopius Caesariensis; c. 500 – c. after 565) was a prominent late
Bulan (Khazar) (520 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Bulan was a Khazar king who led the conversion of the Khazars to Judaism. His name means "elk" or "hart" in Old Turkic. The date of his reign is unknown
Byzantine dance (1,007 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was oriented towards Greek culture and Christianity, rather than Roman paganism, in development of the arts. The Byzantine Empire existed for more than
Imbas forosnai (190 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Imbas forosnai, is a gift of clairvoyance or visionary ability practiced by the gifted poets of ancient Ireland. In Old Irish, Imbas imeans "inspiration
Titus Flavius Clemens (consul) (748 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Titus Flavius T. f. T. n. Clemens was a cousin of the emperor Domitian, with whom he served as consul from January to April in AD 95. Shortly after leaving
Islandmagee witch trial (388 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
councillor Jack McKee who believed the plaque could become a "shrine to paganism" and furthermore stated that he wasn't convinced the women weren't guilty
Sallustius (388 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
On the Gods and the Cosmos, a kind of catechism of 4th-century Hellenic paganism. Sallustius' work owes much to that of Iamblichus of Chalcis, who synthesized
Culture of the Isle of Wight (1,667 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"Druids"), and amongst the inmates incarcerated inside Parkhurst Prison paganism makes up the third most popular religion, according to the Isle of Wight
Jacob Grimm (3,530 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jacob Ludwig Karl Grimm (4 January 1785 – 20 September 1863), also known as Ludwig Karl, was a German philologist, jurist, and mythologist. He is known
Gabriel Turville-Petre (843 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
these subjects is named after him. "The Cult of Freyr in the Evening of Paganism" Proceedings of the Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society 111(6):317-322
Religious use of incense (1,887 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Religious use of incense has its origins in antiquity. The burned incense may be intended as a symbolic or sacrificial offering to various deities or spirits
Anacalypsis (2,002 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anacalypsis (full title: Anacalypsis: An Attempt to Draw Aside the Veil of the Saitic Isis or an Inquiry into the Origin of Languages, Nations and Religions)
Skomorokh (491 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A skomorokh (скоморох in Russian, скоморохъ in Old East Slavic, скоморахъ in Church Slavonic) was a medieval East Slavic harlequin, or actor, who could
Religion in Greece (1,732 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(comprising less than 1% of the population), Evangelicalism, Hellenic Paganism, Sikhism and Hinduism. Also a small number of Greek Atheists exists, not
Queen of Sheba (6,404 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Queen of Sheba (Hebrew: מלכת שבא‎; Arabic: ٱلْمَلِكَة بَلْقِيْس‎, romanized: Al-Malikah Balqīs) is a figure first mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. In
Ramsay MacMullen (367 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
scholarly interests are in the social history of Rome and the replacement of paganism by Christianity. MacMullen graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy and summa
Persecution of Heathens (39 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Persecution of Heathens can refer to: Christianization Decline of Hellenistic polytheism Persecution of pagans in the late Roman Empire Persecution of
Hárbarðsljóð (521 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
AM 748 I 4to manuscripts. It is a flyting poem with figures from Norse Paganism. In this poem, the ferryman Harbard and the god Thor compete in a flyting
Hector Munro Chadwick (490 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hector Munro Chadwick (22 October 1870 – 2 January 1947) was an English philologist and historian, fellow of Clare College and professor of Anglo-Saxon
Brumalia (513 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
winter. Despite the 6th century emperor Justinian's official repression of paganism, the holiday was celebrated at least until the 11th century in the Byzantine
Helena of Adiabene (972 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Helena of Adiabene (Hebrew: הלני מלכת חדייב) (d. ca. 50–56 CE) was a queen of Adiabene (modern-day Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan) and Edessa (modern-day Urfa
Getica (2,930 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
De origine actibusque Getarum (The Origin and Deeds of the Getae [Goths]), commonly abbreviated Getica, written in Late Latin by Jordanes in or shortly
Georges Dumézil (2,526 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Georges Dumézil (French: [ʒɔʁʒ dymezil]; 4 March 1898 – 11 October 1986, Paris) was a French comparative philologist best known for his analysis of sovereignty
The Waterboys (5,381 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
elaborated on this by defining "The Big Music" as "...a mystical celebration of paganism. It's extolling the basic and primitive divinity that exists in everything
Pagan reaction in Poland (881 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The pagan reaction in Poland was a series of events in the Kingdom of Poland in the 1030s that culminated in a popular uprising or rebellion, or possibly
Hallfreðar saga (162 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Instead the saga dwells on the troubled conversion of Hallfreðr from Norse paganism to Christianity and his relationship with King Óláfr Tryggvason and other
Count Theodosius (1,471 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Count Theodosius (Latin: Comes Theodosius, died 376) was a senior military officer serving Emperor Valentinian I and the Western Roman Empire. He is also
Gregory the Illuminator (1,382 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
He was a religious leader who is credited with converting Armenia from paganism to Christianity in 301. Armenia thus became the first nation to adopt Christianity
English folklore (1,638 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
English folklore consists of the myths and legends of England, including the English region's mythical creatures, traditional recipes, urban legends, and
Religion in The Chronicles of Narnia (2,777 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
organizations who feel that The Chronicles of Narnia promotes "soft-sell paganism and occultism", because of the recurring pagan themes and the supposedly
Ram Swarup (1,912 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ram Swarup, other Hindu revivalists also took an interest in European paganism. Christopher Gérard (editor of Antaios, Society for Polytheistic Studies)
Religion in Northern Ireland (1,700 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christianity is the largest religion in Northern Ireland. As per the most recent 2011 census, the prevalence rates for the main religions are: Catholic
Swastika (Germanic Iron Age) (726 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
has been taken as evidence of the swastika as a symbol of Thor in Norse paganism. Kolovrat Valknut George Stephens, The Runic Hall in the Danish Old-Northern
The Pagan Religions of the Ancient British Isles (1,086 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
contemporary Paganism. In keeping with what was by then the prevailing academic view, it disputed the widely held idea that ancient paganism had survived
Old English Orosius (263 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Old English Orosius is the name usually given by scholars to an adaption into Old English of the Latin Historiae adversus paganos by Paulus Orosius (fl
Stones of Mora (657 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Stones of Mora (Swedish: Mora stenar) is a historic location in Knivsta where Swedish kings were elected until 1457. The origin of the tradition is
Magnus Olsen (786 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
philology at the University of Oslo from 1908 to 1948. His writings on Norse paganism and interpretations of the names of Norwegian farms and other placenames
Adiabene (2,487 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(modern-day Erbil, Iraq). Adiabenian rulers converted to Judaism from paganism in the 1st century. Queen Helena of Adiabene (known in Jewish sources as
Threefold death (2,204 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The threefold death, which is suffered by kings, heroes, and gods, is a reconstructed Proto-Indo-European theme encountered in Indic, Greek, Celtic, and
Ed Fitch (602 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
tradition, and was a leading figure in the rise of contemporary Wicca and Neo-Paganism in America. He presently lives in Austin, Texas. Fitch was a graduate of
Nine Noble Virtues (836 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
original AFA. They are supposedly based on virtues found in historical Norse paganism, gleaned from various sources including the Poetic Edda (particularly the
Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (6,780 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is a collection of annals in Old English chronicling the history of the Anglo-Saxons. The original manuscript of the Chronicle
Weeley (328 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Weeley is a village and civil parish in Tendring, east Essex, England. The population of the parish at the 2011 Census was 1,768. It is served by Weeley
Ragnall ua Ímair (2,077 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
immediately challenged by a group of Christian Vikings opposed to his paganism. This group tried to organise an alliance with Æthelflæd, Lady of the Mercians
Ciceronianus (392 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ciceronianus ("The Ciceronian") is a treatise written by Desiderius Erasmus and published in 1528. It attacks the style of scholarly Latin written during
Dhu Nuwas (2,226 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dhū Nuwās, (Arabic: ذو نواس‎), Yūsuf Asʾar Yathʾar (Musnad: 𐩺𐩥𐩪𐩰 𐩱𐩪𐩱𐩧 𐩺𐩻𐩱𐩧, Yws¹f ʾs¹ʾr Yṯʾr) , Yosef Nu'as (Hebrew: יוסף נואס‎), or Yūsuf
Alcuin (4,741 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
arguments seem to have prevailed – Charlemagne abolished the death penalty for paganism in 797. Charlemagne gathered the best men of every land in his court, and
Zbruch Idol (1,288 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
among all Slavic cultures nonetheless. Boris Rybakov in his 1987 work Paganism of Ancient Rus (Russian tribes) argued that four sides of the top tier
Izates bar Monobaz (486 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Izates II (Ἰζάτης), son of Monobaz (Μονόβαζος), or Izates bar Monobaz (also known as Izaates, Persian: ایزد‎ or Hebrew: זוטוס בן מונבז) (ca. 1-55 CE).
Religion in Romania (3,090 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Romania is a secular state, and it has no state religion. Romania is the most religious out of 34 European countries. and a majority of the country's citizens
Martyrology of Tallaght (815 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Martyrology of Tallaght, which is closely related to the Félire Óengusso or Martyrology of Óengus the Culdee, is an eighth- or ninth-century martyrology
Abtalion (1,020 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abtalion (Hebrew: אַבְטַלְיוֹן ʾAbhtalyôn) or Avtalyon (Modern Hebrew) was a rabbinic sage in the early pre-Mishnaic era. He was a leader of the Pharisees
Religion in Austria (2,119 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christianity is the predominant religion in Austria. At the 2001 census, 73.6% of the country's population was Catholic. As of 2018[update], the number
Nobatia (1,460 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nobatia /noʊˈbeɪʃə/ or Nobadia (/noʊˈbeɪdiə/; Greek: Νοβαδία, Nobadia; Old Nubian: ⲙⲓⲅⲓⲧⲛ︦ ⲅⲟⲩⲗ, Migitin Goul) was a late antique kingdom in Lower Nubia
Raven banner (2,976 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The raven banner (Old Norse: hrafnsmerki; Middle English: hravenlandeye) was a flag, possibly totemic in nature, flown by various Viking chieftains and
Two Ewalds (983 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Two Ewalds (or Two Hewalds) were Saint Ewald the Black and Saint Ewald the Fair, martyrs in Old Saxony about 692. Both bore the same name, but were
Riders to the Sea (1,479 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sup still on the dresser. The pervading theme of this work is the subtle paganism Synge observed in the people of rural Ireland. Following his dismissal
The Wicker Tree (1,826 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Wicker Tree is a 2011 British horror film written and directed by Robin Hardy. It contains many direct parallels and allusions to the 1973 film The
Men's skirts (4,586 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2018-12-08. Helen A. Berger (1999). A Community of Witches: Contemporary Neo-paganism and Witchcraft in the United States. University of South Carolina Press
Porphyry of Gaza (1,601 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
contemporary account of Porphyry that chronicles in some detail the end of paganism in Gaza in the early fifth century. However, the text has been identified
Sighere of Essex (191 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
were cousins of their predecessor Swithelm. While Sighere returned to paganism, Sæbbi remained Christian. They soon developed a rivalry. Sighere found
Anarchism and religion (3,260 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anarchists have traditionally been skeptical of or vehemently opposed to organized religion. Nevertheless, some anarchists have provided religious interpretations
Abu Karib (797 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ʼAsʽad the Perfect, (Arabic: أسعد الكامل‎), called "Abū Karīb", full name: Abu Karib As'ad Ibn Hassan MalikiKarib Yuha'min, was king (Tubba', Arabic: تُبَّع‎)
The Deeds of the Saxons (1,214 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Deeds of the Saxons, or Three Books of Annals (Latin: Res gestae saxonicae sive annalium libri tres) is a three-volume chronicle of 10th century Germany
Sibillini Mountains (248 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sibyl cave), a necromancer who survived Christian persecutions against paganism at later Roman age, housed a male prophet who rarely revealed secrets of
Wicker man (924 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
wicker statue reportedly used by the ancient Druids (priests of Celtic paganism) for sacrifice by burning it in effigy. The main evidence for this practice
The Deeds of the Saxons (1,214 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Deeds of the Saxons, or Three Books of Annals (Latin: Res gestae saxonicae sive annalium libri tres) is a three-volume chronicle of 10th century Germany
Robin Wood (artist) (450 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Deck and the cover art for several of Scott Cunningham's books on neo-Paganism. Robin Wood graduated from Michigan State University in 1976 with a degree
The Hebrew Goddess (224 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Hebrew Goddess is a 1967 book by Jewish historian and anthropologist Raphael Patai, in which the author argues that historically, the Jewish religion
Menander I (4,823 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Menander I Soter (Ancient Greek: Μένανδρος Αʹ ὁ Σωτήρ, Ménandros Aʹ ho Sōtḗr, "Menander I the Saviour"; known in Indian Pali sources as Milinda) was an
Priest (5,890 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A priest is a religious leader authorized to perform the sacred rituals of a religion, especially as a mediatory agent between humans and one or more deities
Nephilim (5,089 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Nephilim /ˈnɛfɪˌlɪm/ (Hebrew: נְפִילִים, nefilim) were the offspring of the "sons of God" and the "daughters of men" before the Deluge, according to
Lammas (2,073 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Contemporary Paganism. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill Publishers. pp. 63–67. ISBN 9789004163737. Hume, Lynne (1997). Witchcraft and Paganism in Australia
Rollright Stones (5,655 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
became an important site for adherents of various forms of Contemporary Paganism, as well as for other esotericists, who hold magico-religious ceremonies
List of Viking metal bands (1,608 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
characterized by a lyrical and thematic focus on Norse mythology, Norse paganism, and the Viking Age. Viking metal is quite diverse as a musical style,
Indiculus superstitionum et paganiarum (576 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Indiculus superstitionum et paganiarum (Small index of superstitions and paganism) is a Latin collection of capitularies identifying and condemning superstitious
Sabina Magliocco (866 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
folklore, religion, religious festivals, foodways, witchcraft and Neo-Paganism in Europe and the United States. A recipient of fellowships from the John
Origo Gentis Langobardorum (1,435 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Origo Gentis Langobardorum (Latin for "Origin of the tribe of the Lombards") is a short, 7th-century AD Latin account offering a founding myth of the
The Christians and the Pagans (52 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Christians and the Pagans is an EP by Dar Williams released as a holiday bonus by Razor and Tie. It is also the name of a song by the same artist from
Das Nibelungenlied: Ein Heldenepos in 39 Abenteuern (693 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Das Nibelungenlied (German: The Song of the Nibelungs) is a novel by German writer Albrecht Behmel about the medieval epic of the same name. The story
Monobaz II (353 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Monobazus II was the son of Queen Helena of Adiabene and King Monobazus I. He is known as Monobaz in the Babylonian Talmud. Like his younger brother Izates
Traidenis (529 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was further developed by Gediminas. Traidenis, known for his devotion to paganism and anti-German attitude, was also successful in fighting with the Livonian
Rudolf von Sebottendorf (1,573 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Adam Alfred Rudolf Glauer (9 November 1875 – 8 May 1945?), also known as Rudolf Freiherr von Sebottendorff (or von Sebottendorf) was a German occultist
Traidenis (529 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was further developed by Gediminas. Traidenis, known for his devotion to paganism and anti-German attitude, was also successful in fighting with the Livonian
Winter Nights (202 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Winter Nights or Old Norse vetrnætr was a specific time of year in medieval Scandinavia. According to Zoega's Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, vetr-nætr
Robin Lane Fox (1,049 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander the Great and Ancient Macedon, Late Antiquity, Christianity and Paganism, the Bible and history, and the Greek Dark Ages. His most recent book in
Ecclesiastical History of the English People (6,394 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Ecclesiastical History of the English People (Latin: Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum), written by the Venerable Bede in about AD 731, is a history
Lotte Motz (2,256 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lotte Motz, born Lotte Edlis, (August 16, 1922 – December 24, 1997) was an Austrian-American scholar, obtaining a Ph.D. in German and philology, who published
List of occult symbols (63 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Egyptian symbol for eternal life; now also associated with Kemetism and neo-paganism. Arrow (Belomancy) Ancient divination Arrows used to gain knowledge through
Hallfreðr vandræðaskáld (163 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
emotional life and, especially, his troubled and reluctant conversion from paganism to Christianity under the tutelage of king Óláfr. The following is an example
Flavia Domitilla (saint) (2,872 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Flavia Domitilla, daughter of Domitilla the Younger by an unknown father, perhaps Quintus Petillius Cerialis, had the same name as her mother and her grandmother
Hinduism in Russia (1,259 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Modern Paganism in World Cultures. ABC-CLIO, 2005. p. 222: «In addition to Ukrainian Paganism, Russian and Pan-Slavic varieties of Paganism and "Slavic
Karl Joseph Simrock (479 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Karl Joseph Simrock (August 28, 1802 – July 18, 1876), was a German poet and writer. He is primarily known for his translation of Das Nibelungenlied into
Axel Olrik (1,384 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1918, after his death, studies of Ragnarök, and a book on Scandinavian paganism in the Viking Age, Nordisk Åndsliv i Vikingetid og tidlig Middelalder,
Catholic Church in France (2,352 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
In 496 Remigius baptized King Clovis I, who therefore converted from paganism to Catholicism. In 800, Pope Leo III crowned Charlemagne Emperor of the
Declaration of Indulgence (630 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
theory, licensed the practice of any religion, including Islam, Judaism, or paganism. In Scotland the Indulgence stated that subjects were to obey the King's
Ottar Grønvik (234 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ottar Nicolai Grønvik (21 October 1916 – 15 May 2008) was a Norwegian philologist and runologist. He was a lecturer from 1959 and associate professor from
1693 in Sweden (140 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The process against Lars Nilsson (shaman), who is sentenced to death for Paganism for being a follower of the Sami religion. 22 February - Henrik Horn, friherre
Pravdinsk (1,237 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"Rome", and by their own unwarranted assumption that Baltic paganism should resemble Roman paganism in being focused around a particular geographical center
Béla I of Hungary (2,997 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
monetary reform and subdued the last uprising aimed at the restoration of paganism in Hungary. Béla was fatally injured when his throne collapsed while he
Galdrabók (292 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Galdrabók (Icelandic Book of Magic) is an Icelandic grimoire dated to ca. 1600. It is a small manuscript containing a collection of 47 spells and sigils/staves
Hamilton Wright Mabie (789 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hamilton Wright Mabie, A.M., L.H.D., LL.D. (December 13, 1846 – December 31, 1916) was an American essayist, editor, critic, and lecturer. He was born
1596 in Sweden (120 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
inspection tour through the provinces to eradicate all remains of Catholicism, Paganism and other non-Lutheran practices. - Sweden is afflicted with bad harvests
Ebbe Schön (458 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ebbe Schön (born December 13, 1929 in Brastad, Bohuslän) is a Swedish author, folklorist and associate professor in literature at Stockholm University