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Longer titles found: List of Negro league baseball players (view), List of Negro league baseball teams (view), Timeline of Negro league baseball teams (view), List of Negro league baseball players (S–Z) (view), List of Negro league baseball players (M–R) (view), List of Negro league baseball players (A–D) (view), List of Negro league baseball players (E–L) (view), List of Negro league baseball champions (view), José Muñoz (Negro league baseball) (view), Tom Turner (Negro league baseball player) (view), Memphis Blues (Negro league baseball) (view)

searching for Negro league baseball 35 found (1830 total)

alternate case: negro league baseball

Zack Clayton (184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Zachariah "Zack" Clayton, born: April 17, 1913, Philadelphia, PA, died: 1997, Mount Airy, Philadelphia, PA, was a basketball player for the New York Rens
Mobile Black Bears (88 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Mobile Black Bears, also known as the Mobile Black Shippers, was a semi-professional baseball team composed entirely of African-American players. The
Bush Stadium (1,186 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Owen J. Bush Stadium was a baseball stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana, United States. It was home to the Indianapolis Indians from 1931 to 1996. It was
McCormick Field (466 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
"Ballparks of the Negro Leagues and Barnstorming Black Baseball Teams". Negro League Baseball Players Association. Archived from the original on June 10, 2009
Parkway Field (375 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Parkway Field is the name of a minor league baseball and college baseball park that stood in Louisville, Kentucky. It was home to the Louisville Colonels
Grayson Stadium (541 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William L. Grayson Stadium is a stadium in Savannah, Georgia. It is primarily used for baseball, and is the home field of the Savannah Bananas of the Coastal
League Park (3,125 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
League Park was a baseball park located in Cleveland, Ohio, United States. It was situated at the northeast corner of E. 66th Street and Lexington Avenue
Cramton Bowl (1,347 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cramton Bowl is a 25,000-seat stadium located in Montgomery, Alabama. Cramton Bowl opened in 1922 as a baseball stadium and has been home to Major League
Brooks Lawrence (315 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Brooks Ulysses Lawrence (January 30, 1925 – April 27, 2000) was a Major League Baseball All-Star pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals (1954–1955), Cincinnati
Central Park (Pittsburgh) (235 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Central Park was a baseball venue located in the Hill District of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania from 1921–1925. The stadium was the first black-owned, controlled
Borchert Field (1,678 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Borchert Field was a baseball park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States. The home field for several professional baseball clubs from 1888 through 1952
Gus Greenlee (999 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Augustus "Gus" Greenlee (December 26, 1893 – July 7, 1952) was a Negro League baseball owner and an African-American businessman. Gus Greenlee was born
Frank Leland (716 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Giants. Frank C. Leland produced and worked with well-known pre-Negro League baseball players: Bill LIndsay, Walter Ball, Harry Buckner, William Horn
Majestic Park (2,447 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Majestic Park (1908–18) was one of the first Major League Baseball spring training facilities and was located at the corner of Belding Street and Carson
Abe Saperstein (3,007 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 2020-02-24. Lanctot, Neil (2004). Negro League Baseball: The Rise and Ruin of a Black Institution. University of Pennsylvania
Ponce de Leon Park (657 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ponce de Leon Park (/ˌpɒns də ˈliːən/ PONSS də LEE-ən; also known as Spiller Park or Spiller Field from 1924 to 1932, and "Poncey" to locals, was the primary
Ralph Waldo Emerson Jones (1,130 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ralph Waldo Emerson Jones, Sr. (August 6, 1905 – April 9, 1982), also known as Ralph W. E. Jones or Prez Jones, was from 1936 until his retirement in 1977
Josh Gibson Field (761 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Josh Gibson Field is a baseball venue located in the Hill District of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The field was known as Ammon Field or sometimes Ammons
Luther Williams Field (529 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Luther Williams Field is a baseball stadium in Macon, Georgia. It was built in 1929, and is the centerpiece of Central City Park in Macon. It is the home
George Altman (918 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
original on 2011-09-28. Retrieved 2008-09-02. "George Altman," Negro League Baseball Players Association. Accessed Oct. 7, 2017. Costello, Rory, George
Mack Park (732 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mack Park was the original home field of Detroit's Negro National League baseball franchise, the Detroit Stars. It was constructed in 1914 by Joe Roesink
Bud Fowler (1,017 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John W. "Bud" Fowler (March 16, 1858 – February 26, 1913) was an American baseball player, manager, and club organizer. He is the earliest known African-American
Washington Park (Indianapolis) (558 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Washington Park (formally Washington Baseball Park) was the name of two different minor league baseball parks in Indianapolis, Indiana, in the early 1900s
Comiskey Park (3,347 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Comiskey Park was a baseball park in Chicago, Illinois, located in the Armour Square neighborhood on the near-southwest side of the city. The stadium served
W. S. Peters (152 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William S. Peters (May 1867 – April 2, 1933) was an American baseball, player, manager, and owner who played in predecessor teams to the Negro leagues
Omaha Rockets (162 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Omaha Rockets were a semi-pro, independent Negro league baseball team in Omaha, Nebraska from (1947-1949). Gene Collins and Bob Gibson both began
Buck O'Neil (2,974 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
a guaranteed page-turner". MLB.com. Retrieved October 16, 2011. Negro league baseball statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference (Negro
Bugle Field (460 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
corporation on record in Baltimore County, Maryland. An earlier Negro League baseball field was the "Maryland Baseball Park", 1923–1929. Games were also
Engel Stadium (1,443 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Engel Stadium is a stadium in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The stadium was built in 1930 and holds 12,000 people. It was the home of the Chattanooga Lookouts
Mobile Tigers (580 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Mobile Tigers, a semi-professional baseball team composed entirely of African-American players based in Mobile, Alabama, was among the leading teams
Ernie Smith (baseball, born 1931) (85 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Ernest Elsworth Smith, Sr. (April 11, 1931 - May 22, 2012) played for the Baltimore Elite Giants of the Negro American League. Smith was the first member
Hilldale Park (403 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
University Press. pp. 65. ISBN 1-56639-861-4. Lanctot, Neil (2004). Negro League Baseball: The Rise and Ruin of a Black Institution. Philadelphia: University
Joe Taylor (baseball) (599 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Joe Cephus Taylor (March 2, 1926 – March 18, 1993) was an American baseball player whose 18-year semi-pro and professional career included 119 games over
Cincinnati Browns (82 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Cincinnati Browns were a professional baseball team in the National Colored Base Ball League, the first attempt at a professional Negro League in 1887
Roy Partlow (609 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Partlow (June 8, 1911 – April 19, 1987) was an American pitcher in Negro league baseball. He played between 1934 and 1951. A left handed pitcher of great