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Longer titles found: Middle English Bible translations (view), Middle English Dictionary (view), Middle English Lyric (view), Middle English Metrical Paraphrase of the Old Testament (view), Middle English creole hypothesis (view), Middle English literature (view), Middle English phonology (view), Index of Middle English Verse (view)

searching for Middle English 121 found (3219 total)

alternate case: middle English

Polemic (902 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

A polemic (/pəˈlɛmɪk/) is contentious rhetoric that is intended to support a specific position by aggressive claims and undermining of the opposing position
Bass (fish) (344 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
large order Perciformes, or perch-like fishes. The word bass comes from Middle English bars, meaning "perch". The black basses, such as the Choctaw bass (Micropterus
Black pudding (1,491 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Black pudding is a type of blood sausage originating in the United Kingdom and Ireland. It is made from pork blood, with pork fat or beef suet, and a cereal
Jargon (2,332 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
word may also come from Old French jargon meaning "chatter of birds". Middle English also has the verb jargounen meaning "to chatter," or "twittering," deriving
Melee (357 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Melee (/ˈmeɪleɪ/ or /ˈmɛleɪ/, French: mêlée [mɛle]) or pell-mell battle generally refers to disorganized hand-to-hand combat in battles fought at abnormally
Illustration (1,135 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
writing or in picture form. The origin of the word “illustration” is late Middle English (in the sense ‘illumination; spiritual or intellectual enlightenment’):
Walter Hilton (1,741 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Middle English Texts Series, University of Rochester, Rossell Hope Robbins Library Scale I text in the original Middle English: TEAMS Middle English Texts
Ogive (1,036 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the other. However, Merriam-Webster's dictionary says it is from the "Middle English oggif stone comprising an arch, from Middle French augive, ogive diagonal
We (615 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
We is the first-person plural personal pronoun (nominative case) in Modern English. A nosism is the use of 'we' to refer to oneself. A common example is
Syncope (phonology) (540 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
caldo in several Romance languages. Old English hlāfweard > hlāford > Middle English loverd > Modern English lord, pronounced /lɔːrd/ English Worcester,
Breastplate (735 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A breastplate or chestplate is a device worn over the torso to protect it from injury, as an item of religious significance, or as an item of status. A
Pandarus (832 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pandarus /ˈpændərəs/ or Pandar /ˈpændər/ (Ancient Greek: Πάνδαρος Pándaros) is a Trojan aristocrat who appears in stories about the Trojan War. In Homer's
John Hall (physician) (493 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Hall (1575 – 25 November 1635) was a physician and son-in-law of William Shakespeare. He was born at Carlton, Bedfordshire and studied at Queens'
Ēostre (3,941 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
also appears in the Liber Vitae, and is likely the ancestor of the Middle English name Estrild. Various continental Germanic names include the element
Wainfleet All Saints (1,098 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wainfleet All Saints is an ancient port and market town on the east coast of England, in the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, on the A52 road 5 miles
Aframomum melegueta (1,435 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aframomum melegueta is a species in the ginger family, Zingiberaceae, and closely related to cardamom. Its seeds are used as a spice (ground or whole);
Rubery (384 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rubery is a village in the Bromsgrove district of Worcestershire. Part of the village also forms a southern suburb of Birmingham, England. The village
Hatmaking (1,113 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
primarily for a women clientele. The origin of the term is probably the Middle English milener, meaning an inhabitant of the city of Milan or one who deals
Kesteven (875 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Parts of Kesteven (/ˈkɛstəvən/ or /kəˈstiːvən/) are a traditional subdivision of Lincolnshire, England. This subdivision had long had a separate county
Hertford (2,871 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hertford (/ˈhɑːrtfərd/ HART-fərd, locally /ˈhɑːrfərd/ HAR-fərd) is the county town of Hertfordshire, England, and is also a civil parish in the East Hertfordshire
John Lydgate (1,206 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Allan Mitchell, ed. John Lydgate, The Temple of Glass. Series: TEAMS Middle English Texts. Kalamazoo, MI: Medieval Institute Publications, 2007. A few of
Diggers (3,348 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Diggers were a group of Protestant radicals in England, sometimes seen as forerunners of modern anarchism, and also associated with agrarian socialism
Richard Pace (610 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Pace (c. 1482 – 28 June 1536) was an English diplomat of the Tudor period. He was probably born in Hampshire; he was educated at Winchester College
Brittonic languages (3,554 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
comes from Latin: Britannia~Brittania, via Old French Bretaigne and Middle English Breteyne, possibly influenced by Old English Bryten(lond), probably
Poet laureate (4,525 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A poet laureate (plural: poets laureate) is a poet officially appointed by a government or conferring institution, typically expected to compose poems
Myth (7,770 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Accessed 20 Aug 2014. Lydgate, John. Troyyes Book, Vol. II, ll. 2487. (in Middle English) Reprinted in Henry Bergen's Lydgate's Troy Book, Vol. I, p. 216. Kegan
Language code (219 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
macr1271 – macro-English (Modern English, incl. creoles) midd1317 – Middle English merc1242 – Mercian (Middle – Modern English) olde1238 – Old English
Sulfur (7,975 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
14th century, the erroneously Hellenized Latin -ph- was restored in Middle English sulphre. By the 15th century, both full Latin spelling variants sulfur
Merrion Castle (637 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Merrion Castle was a castle situated in present-day Mount Merrion, to the south of Dublin city centre. Built in the early fourteenth century, it was from
Hay-on-Wye (2,226 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hay-on-Wye (Welsh: Y Gelli Gandryll or just Y Gelli), often abbreviated to just "Hay", is a small market town and community in the historic county of Brecknockshire
Cotton library (2,192 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Cotton or Cottonian library is a collection of manuscripts once owned by Sir Robert Bruce Cotton MP (1571–1631), an antiquarian and bibliophile. It
Caesura (1,316 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A caesura (/siˈzjʊərə/, pl. caesuras or caesurae; Latin for "cutting"), also written cæsura and cesura, is a break in a verse where one phrase ends and
Little Bo-Peep (619 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Little Bo-Peep" or "Little Bo-Peep has lost her sheep" is a popular English language nursery rhyme. It has a Roud Folk Song Index number of 6487. As with
Military (7,220 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A military is a heavily armed, highly organised force primarily intended for warfare, also known collectively as armed forces. It is typically officially
Blancmange (1,123 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Blancmange (/bləˈmɒ̃ʒ/, from French: blanc-manger [blɑ̃mɑ̃ʒe]) is a sweet dessert commonly made with milk or cream and sugar thickened with gelatin, corn
Mendip District (1,582 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mendip is a local government district of Somerset in England. The district covers a largely rural area of 285 square miles (738 km2) with a population
Croquet (6,096 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Croquet (croquêt) is a sport that involves hitting wooden or plastic balls with a mallet through hoops (often called "wickets" in the United States) embedded
Skirmish of Keith (703 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Skirmish of Keith was a conflict that took place on the 20 March 1746 in Keith, Moray, Scotland and was part of the Jacobite rising of 1745. In March
The Death of Queen Jane (1,124 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"The Death of Queen Jane" is an English ballad that describes the events surrounding the death of a Queen Jane. It is catalogued by Francis James Child
Adam lay ybounden (981 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Middle English original spelling Middle English converted (Edith Rickert) Adam lay i-bowndyn, bowndyn in a bond, Fowre thowsand wynter thowt he not to
Faggot (unit) (449 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
long faggot was also called a kidd faggot, kid, kide, or kidde being Middle English for firewood in bundles. A fascine (or bavin) is a type of long faggot
Anointing (4,817 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anointing is the ritual act of pouring aromatic oil over a person's head or entire body. By extension, the term is also applied to related acts of sprinkling
Supt (113 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Bourgogne-Franche-Comté region in eastern France. supt (s) is a Middle English term for [dined]. A verb from the noun: [Supper]. To consume Dinner
The College of Richard Collyer (2,267 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The College of Richard Collyer (colloquially Collyer's /ˈkɒliəz/), formerly called Collyer's School, is a co-educational sixth form college in Horsham
John Fisher (4,184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Fisher (c. 19 October 1469 – 22 June 1535), was an English Catholic bishop, cardinal, and theologian. Fisher was also an academic, and eventually
Lias Group (476 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
It consists of marine limestones, shales, marls and clays. Lias is a Middle English term for hard limestone, used in this specific sense by geologists since
Cornish bagpipes (1,566 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cornish bagpipes (Cornish: Pibow sagh kernewek) are the forms of bagpipes once common in Cornwall in the 19th century. Bagpipes and pipes are mentioned
Intuition (2,935 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from the Latin verb intueri translated as "consider" or from the late middle English word intuit, "to contemplate". Both Eastern and Western philosophers
The Tale of Gamelyn (3,074 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tale of Gamelyn is a romance written in c. 1350 in a dialect of Middle English, considered part of the Matter of England. It is presented in a style
Scarborough Fair (ballad) (2,111 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Yorkshire. The melody is in Dorian mode and is very typical of the middle English period. The lyrics of "Scarborough Fair" appear to have something in
The Wedding of Sir Gawain and Dame Ragnelle (1,865 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of a deer by the king in Inglewood Forest, a setting that in other Middle English Arthurian poems such as The Awntyrs off Arthure and Sir Gawain and the
Healey Nab (270 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
heagh (high) and ley (woodland). "Nab" is believed to derive from the Middle-English word nabb meaning a promontory or headland. The area is popular with
Crwth (1,761 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The crwth (/ˈkruːθ/ or /ˈkrʊθ/), also called a crowd or rote, is a bowed lyre, a type of stringed instrument, associated particularly with Welsh music
Early English Text Society (373 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
only available in manuscript. Most of its volumes contain editions of Middle English or Old English texts. It is known for being the first to print many
Morris dance (4,913 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Morris dance is a form of English folk dance usually accompanied by music. It is based on rhythmic stepping and the execution of choreographed figures
The Elm and the Vine (988 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Elm and the Vine were associated particularly by Latin authors. Because pruned elm trees acted as vine supports, this was taken as a symbol of marriage
The Frogs Who Desired a King (1,869 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Frogs Who Desired a King is one of Aesop's Fables and numbered 44 in the Perry Index. Throughout its history, the story has been given a political
Toby (686 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
male name in many English speaking countries. The name is from the Middle English vernacular form of Tobias. Tobias itself is the Greek transliteration
Battle of Camlann (1,983 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
languages, including Wace's Anglo-Norman Roman de Brut (c. 1155), Layamon's Middle English Brut (early 13th century), and the Welsh Brut y Brenhinedd (mid-13th
Pillow (3,339 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
made from natural materials in the world. The word pillow comes from Middle English pilwe, from Old English pyle (akin to Old High German pfuliwi) and from
Scrye (547 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Gathering. The name, a registered trademark, is adapted from a Middle English word meaning "to tell the future." JM White, publisher of the role-playing
Figgy pudding (604 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"figgy", this dish being known as figgy pudding or fig pudding: The Middle English name had several spellings, including ffygey, fygeye, fygee, figge,
Parlement of Foules (1,124 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Parlement of Foules (also known as the Parliament of Foules, Parlement of Briddes, Assembly of Fowls, Assemble of Foules, or The Parliament of Birds)
Frithuswith (945 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
12th-century Latin texts (edited by John Blair) were adapted into two Middle English accounts of the Life of Saint Frithuswith, which are included in the
Keep (7,239 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A keep (from the Middle English kype) is a type of fortified tower built within castles during the Middle Ages by European nobility. Scholars have debated
Round shot (699 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was made in early times from dressed stone, referred to as gunstone (Middle English gunneston, from gonne, gunne gun + stoon, ston stone), but by the 17th
Mendip Hills (7,117 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Mendip Hills (commonly called the Mendips) is a range of limestone hills to the south of Bristol and Bath in Somerset, England. Running east to west
Gammon (meat) (283 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
at Christmas or on Boxing Day. The word 'gammon' is derived from the Middle English word for 'ham', gambon, which is attested since the early 15th century
Margery Kempe (3,715 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2001. British Library MS Add. 61823: The Margery Kempe Manuscript Middle English Text of The Book of Margery Kempe Mapping Margery Kempe, a site including
Somers Isles Company (2,423 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Somers Isles Company (fully, The London Company of The Somers Isles or the Company of The Somers Isles) was formed in 1615 to operate the English colony
Peter Dendle (557 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
20th and 21st century representations of the Middle Ages, Old and Middle English (language and literature), and the monstrous (in film, folklore, and
Gudgeon pin (747 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
gudgeon is a pivot or journal. The origin of the word gudgeon is the Middle English word gojoun, which originated from the Middle French word goujon. Its
Chipping, Lancashire (1,997 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chipping is a village and civil parish of the borough of Ribble Valley, Lancashire, England, within the Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
1604 in literature (736 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1604. January 1 – The King's Men perform Shakespeare's comedy A Midsummer Night's
John Dury (2,966 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Dury (1596 in Edinburgh – 1680 in Kassel) was a Scottish Calvinist minister and a significant intellectual of the English Civil War period. He made
Professional (942 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The etymology and historical meaning of the term professional is from Middle English, from profes, adjective, having professed one's vows, from Anglo-French
Anelida and Arcite (311 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anelida and Arcite is a 357-line English poem by Geoffrey Chaucer. It tells the story of Anelida, queen of Armenia and her wooing by false Arcite from
Limer (1,067 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
It was sometimes known as a lyam hound/dog or lime-hound, from the Middle English word lyam meaning 'leash'. The French cognate limier has sometimes been
Limer (1,067 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
It was sometimes known as a lyam hound/dog or lime-hound, from the Middle English word lyam meaning 'leash'. The French cognate limier has sometimes been
Freeman (570 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
freedom of the company, was a rank within Livery companies Freeman, in Middle English synonymous with franklin (class), initially a person not tied to land
Anelida and Arcite (311 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anelida and Arcite is a 357-line English poem by Geoffrey Chaucer. It tells the story of Anelida, queen of Armenia and her wooing by false Arcite from
List of medical roots, suffixes and prefixes (327 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
denotes something as 'before' another (in [physical] position or time) Middle English pre-, from Medieval Latin pre- < (Classical) Latin prae-, before, in
Methods of divination (4,567 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
/ˈdrɪərɪmænsi/: by dripping blood (alteration of drimimancy, influenced by Middle English drir, blood) drimimancy/drymimancy /ˈdrɪmɪmænsi/: by bodily fluids (Greek
William Worsley (priest) (656 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Worsley (1435?−1499), was a dean of St. Paul's cathedral. He is assumed to have been educated at Cambridge, as he is not mentioned in Wood; he
Pet door (1,633 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A pet door or pet flap (also referred to in more specific terms, such as cat flap, cat door, dog door, or doggy door) is a small opening to allow pets
Master builder (453 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A master builder or master mason is a central figure leading construction projects in pre-modern times (a precursor to the modern architect and engineer)
Jack Upland (217 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jack Upland or Jack up Lande (c. 1389–96?) is a polemical, probably Lollard, literary work which can be seen as a "sequel" to Piers Plowman, with Antichrist
Pargeting (336 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
feeling of motion and flow." Pargeting derives from the word 'parget', a Middle English term that is probably derived from the Old French pargeter or parjeter
John Dee (7,321 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Dee (13 July 1527 – 1608 or 1609) was an Anglo-Welsh mathematician, astronomer, astrologer and occult philosopher, and an advisor to Queen Elizabeth
Huchoun (821 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A. Epistle of Sweet Susan in Heroic Women for the Old Testament in Middle English Verse, Kalamazoo, Michigan: Medieval Institute Publications, 1991 Harvey
Chester Mystery Plays (816 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Chester Mystery Plays is a cycle of mystery plays originating in the city of Chester, England and dating back to at least the early part of the 15th
Chester Mystery Plays (816 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Chester Mystery Plays is a cycle of mystery plays originating in the city of Chester, England and dating back to at least the early part of the 15th
Saint Patrick's Saltire (6,424 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Patrick's Saltire or Saint Patrick's Cross is a red saltire (X-shaped cross) on a white field, used to represent the island of Ireland or Saint Patrick
Interrogative word (1,036 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in Middle English (following spelling change) the vowel changed to /uː/ and it followed the same sound change as how before it, but with the Middle English
Jeremy Taylor (2,916 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jeremy Taylor (1613–1667) was a cleric in the Church of England who achieved fame as an author during the Protectorate of Oliver Cromwell. He is sometimes
Shrewsbury (12,442 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shrewsbury (/ˈʃroʊzbri/ (listen) SHROHZ-bree, /ˈʃruːz-/ (listen) SHROOZ-) is a large market town and the county town of Shropshire, England. The town is
Chanonry of Ross (2,365 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Castle Chanonry of Ross, also known as Seaforth Castle, was located in the town of Fortrose, to the north-east of Inverness, on the peninsula known as
Bogle (848 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
than seriously harming or serving them. The name is derived from the Middle-English Bugge (of which the term bogey is also derived) which is in turn a cognate
Siege of Thebes (poem) (557 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Siege of Thebes is a 4716 line poem written by John Lydgate between 1420 and 1422. Lydgate composed the Siege of Thebes directly following his composition
Richard Rolle (3,183 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(17 from the Continent), and seven independent Middle English translations. Ego Dormio, a Middle English prosimetrum, one of two letters written for nuns
List of English words of Old Norse origin (3,010 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Old French, which via Anglo-Norman were then indirectly loaned into Middle English; an example is flâneur, via French from the Old Norse verb flana "to
The Devil's Coach Horses (199 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from eafor "packhorse", from a verb aferian "transport", related to Middle English aver "draught-horse", a word surviving in northern dialects. The Proto-Germanic
Travel (1,252 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
travel was in the 14th century. It also states that the word comes from Middle English travailen, travelen (which means to torment, labor, strive, journey)
Mary Astell (3,039 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
If all Men are born free, how is it that all Women are born Slaves? – Mary Astell, Some Reflections upon Marriage Mary Astell (Newcastle upon Tyne, 12
Amortization (472 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
useful life to reduce a company's taxable income. The word comes from Middle English amortisen to kill, alienate in mortmain, from Anglo-French amorteser
Amortization (472 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
useful life to reduce a company's taxable income. The word comes from Middle English amortisen to kill, alienate in mortmain, from Anglo-French amorteser
Odd Rode (279 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"Odd" (Middle English odde) in the sense of "the third of three", i.e. to contrast this Rode with North Rode and Rode Heath; "Hood's" (Middle English hod)
1555 in literature (389 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1555. The Portuguese humanist writer Achilles Statius relocates to Rome. Roger Taverner
Tochmarc Étaíne (1,533 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dé Danann. It is frequently cited as a possible source text for the Middle English Sir Orfeo. Harvard professor Jeffrey Gantz describes the text as displaying
Pierce the Ploughman's Crede (2,032 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 0-19-871102-6. Szittya, Penn R. (1977). "The Antifraternal Tradition in Middle English". Speculum. 52 (2): 287–313. doi:10.2307/2850514. JSTOR 2850514. Penn
The Owl and the Nightingale (2,657 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
thirteenth-century Middle English poem detailing a debate between an owl and a nightingale as overheard by the poem's narrator. It is the earliest example in Middle English
Patrapur (175 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
People are dependent on rain for crops. There are 3 Primary Schools, one Middle English School, one Girls' High School and one Co-educational High School. Banks
The equatorie of the planetis (1,210 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The equatorie of the planetis is a 14th-century scientific work which describes an equatorium. It was discovered in 1952 by Derek J. Price, and has sometimes
1577 in science (190 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The year 1577 in science and technology included many events, some of which are listed here. The Constantinople Observatory of Taqi ad-Din is completed
McLaughlin (surname) (1,582 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
spellings). O'Melaghlin was a phonetic rendering into Anglo-Norman and Middle English of ó Mǽilsheáchlainn. That family is part of the historic Clann Cholmáin
Medieval parish churches of York (4,833 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 53°57′29″N 1°04′55″W / 53.958°N 1.082°W / 53.958; -1.082 York had around forty-five parish churches in 1300. Twenty survive, in whole or
King Horn (1,974 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
King Horn is a Middle English chivalric romance dating back to the middle of the thirteenth century. It survives in three manuscripts: MS. Harley 2253
Countesthorpe (462 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
William the Conqueror. The 'thorpe' part of the name is a variant of the Middle English word thorp, meaning hamlet or small village. The parish church of St
Phonemic orthography (3,116 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
alphabetic but highly nonphonemic; it was once mostly phonemic during the Middle English stage, when the modern spellings originated, but spoken English changed
Vernacular literature (524 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Barbour's The Brus (in Scots), Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (in Middle English) and Jacob van Maerlant's Spieghel Historiael (in Middle Dutch). Indeed
Teal (799 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
teal as a color name in English was in 1917. It is derived from the Middle English tele, a word akin to the Dutch taling and the Middle Low German telink