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searching for Medard (name) 547 found (686 total)

alternate case: medard (name)

Medard (4,948 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

For the Catholic saint, see Medardus. Medard is an Ortsgemeinde – a municipality belonging to a Verbandsgemeinde, a kind of collective municipality – in
Medardus (1,237 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Saint Médard" redirects here. For other uses, see Saint-Médard (disambiguation). Saint Medardus or St Medard (French: Médard or Méard) (456–545) was the
Médard des Groseilliers (1,381 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Médard Chouart des Groseilliers (1618–1696) was a French explorer and fur trader in Canada. He is often paired with his brother-in-law Pierre-Esprit Radisson
Oye-Plage (443 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the tower leans about twenty degrees, hence its name (penchée = leaning). The modern church of St.Médard. The remains of the château, which was subject
Ancienville (823 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Processional Staff of Saint Médard (18th century) A Baptismal font (1788) A set of 2 Stained glass windows: Saint Médard, donor, Nativity, and the adoration
Felzins (31 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Felzins is a commune in the Lot department in south-western France. The name Felzins comes from the Latin Felzino, Felzinio, Filiciniaco. Communes of
Canéjan (147 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
firefighters' graves. There used to be two different ways of spelling the name of the city, Canéjean or Canéjan, in July 1987 it has been decided to keep
Cabrerets (219 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
department in south-western France. The village of Cabrerets derives its name from cabre, meaning goat in the Occitan language. The village lies at the
Soissons (992 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Frankish territory of Neustria, the Soissons region, and the Abbey of Saint-Médard, built in the 8th century, played an important political part during the
Rudolph of France (921 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles the Simple. He was crowned by Walter, Archbishop of Sens at St.Médard in Soissons on Sunday, 13 July 923. On assuming the crown he passed the
Cadillac, Gironde (128 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cadillac is the home of the imposing Château des Ducs d'Épernon. The name of the commune was adopted by Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac
Taillecavat (84 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gironde department and Nouvelle-Aquitaine region in southwestern France. The name of the commune in occitan is Talhacavat. Taillecavat is located at
Sigebert I (584 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For the Saxon ruler by this name, see Sigeberht I of Essex. Sigebert I (c. 535 – c. 575) was the Germanic king of Austrasia from the death of his father
Siamese fireback (184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
between four and eight rosy eggs. The scientific name commemorates the French naturalist Pierre-Médard Diard. Due to habitat loss and over-hunting in
Sers, Charente (396 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
river Échelle, Sers is on the edge of the forest of Horte to the south. The name is pronounced without sounding the final s [sɛʀ]. Neighbouring communes
Adenbach (2,935 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
villages of Heinzenhausen, Lohnweiler, Lauterecken, Medard, Roth, Schwanden (a now vanished village near Medard), Obersulzbach, Niedersulzbach, Ginsweiler, Mannweiler
Lacave, Lot (133 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Martin-le-Redon Saint-Matré Saint-Maurice-en-Quercy Saint-Médard Saint-Médard-de-Presque Saint-Médard-Nicourby Saint-Michel-de-Bannières Saint-Michel-Loubéjou
Sauzé-Vaussais (215 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Deux-Sèvres department in western France. The residents shorten its name to Sauzé. Local features Sauzé-Vaussais has an old town centre with a clock
Castillon-la-Bataille (225 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mothe-Montraval, on the right bank of the Dordogne, a tumulus is pointed out under the name of Talbot's tomb; but it is known that his body was removed by his friends
Bordeaux Bombers (432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Montpellier. 4 July 2009 saw the second French National Cup being played in Saint-Médard-en-Jalles near Bordeaux on the first dedicated Australian Rule football
Gaël Fickou (224 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
2013 tour to New Zealand According to Toulouse and France teammate, Maxime Médard, Fickou "is one of the 10 best centres in the world and soon he will be
Bruges, Gironde (61 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The homography with Bruges (Belgium) is purely coincidental. The place-name comes from Gasconic bruche, with a plural -s meaning "bushes", "scrubs".
Rue Mouffetard (452 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mouffetard and the rue de Lacepede. Its southern terminus is at the Square Saint-Médard where there is a permanent open-air market. At its northern terminus, it
Clermont-d'Excideuil (126 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
between the hamlets La Valade to the north and Le Verdier to the south. The name of the locality Pierres Brunes is a reminder of the megaliths. They were
Saint-Émilion (319 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Latin poet Ausonius lauded the fruit of the bountiful vine. The town was named after the monk Émilion, a travelling confessor, who settled in a hermitage
CCGS Des Groseilliers (245 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
medium Arctic icebreaker in the Canadian Coast Guard. The vessel is named after Médard Chouart Des Groseilliers (1618-1669) a close associate of Pierre-Esprit
Le Puy, Gironde (386 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For other places with the same name, see Le Puy (disambiguation). Le Puy is a commune in the Gironde department in Nouvelle-Aquitaine in southwestern France
Fronsac, Gironde (334 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Nouvelle-Aquitaine region in southwestern France. The town gave its name to the Fronsac AOC wine. The commune is situated in the Fronsadais (fr)
Martel, Lot (460 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
medieval town in a region well known for its walnuts and truffles. The name of the town means "hammer", and three of these are to be seen on the town's
Souillac, Lot (373 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the river cuts through the limestone plateau of Haut-Quercy, a historic name for the northern part of the Department of Lot. This is part of the Massif
Christophe Lamaison (377 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
despite lucrative offers from the English side Saracens and played for Saint-Médard-en-Jalles in the Fédérale 2. He retired from all rugby in 2006. "Frédéric
Moulis-en-Médoc (512 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
mills to grind the grain. It is from the term "Moulin" that Moulis takes its name: "Moulinis." The existing vines belonged to some feudal proprietors and a
La Réole (644 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
7th or 8th century, which was reformed in the 11th century and took the name of Regula, whence that of the town. During the Middle Ages, La Réole was
Sainte-Soulle (180 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1990s and many of its residents are now employed in nearby La Rochelle. The name of the commune comes from the local saint Soline (see also the commune of
Mérignac, Gironde (356 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Bordeaux International Airport. The name Mérignac derives from the Gallo-Roman word Matriniacus, name of a villa rustica (countryside villa) that
Chef-Boutonne (43 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
in western France. The Boutonne has its source in the commune, hence its name, Chef-Boutonne meaning head of the Boutonne. Communes of the Deux-Sèvres
Excideuil (332 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the territory of the adjacent communes Saint-Martial-d'Albarède and Saint-Médard-d'Excideuil. The first reference to Excideuil, as Exidolium is found in
Puy-l'Évêque (519 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Guillaume de Cardaillac, took possession of it and gave it the present name of Puy-l’Evêque, "Bishop's Hill". From then on, it remained under the control
Cahors (718 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
industry. Cahors has had a rich history since Celtic times. The original name of the town was Divona or Divona Cadurcorum, "Divona of the Cadurci," Divona
Little Bytham (1,488 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
saints, St Medard and St Gildard (or Medardus and Gildardus); the dedication is unique in the UK. Virtually unknown in Britain, St Medard is still well
Lauterecken (8,050 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
is wooded. Lauterecken borders in the northeast on the municipality of Medard, in the east on the municipality of Cronenberg, in the southeast on the
Acy, Aisne (974 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
monuments: A Calvary on Rue de la Croutelle (1878) The Parish Church of Saint-Médard (12th century) The Church contains many items that are registered as historical
Chlothar I (4,058 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Basilica of St. Marie, where he had started to build the tomb of St. Médard. Charibert received the ancient kingdom of Childebert I, between the Somme
La Coquille (170 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
during his journey. As a community, the name of La Coquille only appeared officially in 1856, replacing the name of Sainte-Marie-de-Frugie. The Côle flows
Margaux (240 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Garonne estuary, northwest of the city of Bordeaux. Margaux is the name of the wine appellation d'origine, Margaux AOC, that encompasses the village
Badefols-sur-Dordogne (500 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
River. As its name suggests, the town is set on the edge of the Dordogne, on the left bank, downstream from the dam Mauzac.The name of the town is of
Barsac, Gironde (176 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
located 37 km upstream the Garonne river of Bordeaux. The town gives its name to a wine making appellation, Barsac AOC, that produces sweet white wines
Cronenberg, Rhineland-Palatinate (2,347 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
280 m above sea level. The Sulzbach itself rises near Hohenöllen and near Medard it empties into the river Glan. The gentle elevations around the village
Bazas (509 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
publication now in the public domain: Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton.  Bordeaux Roquetaillade
Sauveterre-de-Guyenne (224 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
founded as an English Bastide in 1281 by King Edward I of England, in the name of ending rivalries among the lords. He signed the "Charte des Coutumes de
Tabanac (186 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Renon (now a private house and not connected to the vineyard of the same name) and local housing. The small size of the Borg means that there are no shops
Arcachon (527 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
complaints.[citation needed] Arcachon is known for the "Arcachonnaise", the local name for an Arcachon villa, which is the architectural style of many of the older
La Douze (63 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
until 1943. On Cassini's map of France between 1756 and 1789, the village is identified by the name Ladouze. Communes of the Dordogne department INSEE
Aujac (Charente-Maritime) (89 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Saint-Martin-de-Coux Saint-Martin-de-Juillers Saint-Martin-de-Ré Saint-Médard Saint-Médard-d'Aunis Saint-Nazaire-sur-Charente Saint-Ouen Saint-Ouen-d'Aunis
Ginsweiler (4,028 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and Medard and the Remigiusland, a domain held by the Archbishopric of Reims. In 1327, the Counts of Veldenz also bought the lordship of Medard. Ginsweiler
Saint-Romain-et-Saint-Clément (62 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In 1827, the municipalities of St. Clement and St. Romain merge under the name of Saint-Romain-et-Saint-Clement. The Côle forms the commune's northeastern
2016 France rugby union tour of Argentina (299 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
as per 19 June, the first test match of the tour. On 6 June, Guy Novès named the first set of players for France's two-test series against Argentina
Saint-Front-sur-Nizonne (70 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
southwestern France. In 1912, the commune of Saint-Front-de-Champniers changed its name to Saint-Front-sur-Nizonne. The Lizonne, also called Nizonne, flows west
La Rochefoucauld, Charente (325 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
occupied France and Vichy France during World War II. The village takes its name from the large chateau above the village, which is partially open to the
Sarliac-sur-l'Isle (240 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dordogne department in Nouvelle-Aquitaine in southwestern France. The name of the commune comes from that of a person of Gallo-Roman origin, Cærellius
Arget (911 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Touroun Vignau The commune name in béarnais is Arget. Michel Grosclaude was unable to justify the local belief that the name means "sandy place" from arena
Arnicourt (408 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Church of Saint-Médard. The Chateau of Arnicourt (18th century) is registered as an historical monument. Church of Saint-Médard Cross
Chassenon (109 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
commune in the Charente department in southwestern France. The ancient name of the village was Cassinomagus. Situated on the Agrippan Way (Lyon - Saintes)
Saint-Astier, Dordogne (30 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dordogne department in Nouvelle-Aquitaine in southwestern France. It takes its name from a sixth-century saint. Communes of the Dordogne department INSEE
Saint-Lin (34 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For the village in Canada with the same name, see: Saint-Lin-Laurentides, Quebec. Saint-Lin is a commune in the Deux-Sèvres department in western France
Rocamadour (1,167 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the tourist trade, lies near the river on the lowest slopes; it gives its name to Rocamadour, a small goat's milk cheese that was awarded AOC status in
Le Fleix (125 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
River at a place where the river bends. This is likely the origin of the name "flexus". Le Fleix is famous for the Treaty of Fleix, signed there in 1580
Pomacle (665 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
that the church of Pomacle was placed under the double patronage of St Medard and St Gildart. churche and war memorial Pomacle suffered
Taillebourg, Charente-Maritime (129 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
downstream from Saintes. It was the site of three battles that bear its name: Battle of Taillebourg, on account of its strategically important position
Saint-Eutrope (603 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ansac-sur-Vienne Anville Ars Asnières-sur-Nouère Aubeterre-sur-Dronne Auge-Saint-Médard Aunac Aussac-Vadalle Baignes-Sainte-Radegonde Balzac Barbezières Barbezieux-Saint-Hilaire
Airvault (205 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Airvault overlooks the church. François-Marie Arouet might have chosen his pen name, Voltaire, by inverting the syllables of the word “Airvault.” Although this
Archingeay (815 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
south of the village and flows west into the Boutonne. The name may come from the name of the Roman general Arcantius. This commune had an Abbey which
Villebois-Lavalette (595 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The town gets its name from its location on the main Roman road from Périgueux to Saintes. It is thought to be named after a "town located in the
Saint-Junien-la-Bregère (48 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
only commercial operations are forestry, farming and a small campsite. The name of the commune is a corruption of Saint Junien les Bruyères (heath).
Sainte-Orse (251 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the village under the name of "'Saint Orse"', and during the revolutionary period of the National Convention (1792-1795), the name was "'Orse-le-stony"
Veauche (49 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
in France's Loire and has approximately 8000 veauchois and veauchoises. Veauche name is mentioned as early as 1000. Communes of the Loire department
Odenbach (5,385 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the lordship over St. Medard to the Bishopric of Verdun on the Meuse sometime about the year 600. While the Church of St. Medard was the hub for local
Taizé, Deux-Sèvres (32 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Deux-Sèvres department in western France, one of three that share the name, confusing several hundred pilgrims a year. Communes of the Deux-Sèvres
Nontron (174 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
southwestern France. According to the historian Ribault de Laugardière, the name Nontron derives from the Tyrian language, from Nata (valley) and Dun (mountain)
Payzac, Dordogne (401 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paysac and since the late-19th century: Payzac. The official name Payzac replaced the older name Payzac-de-Lanouaille in 1961. During the French Revolution
Ajat (443 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
is visible. In a document dating from 1158 (the Cartulaire Cadouin) the name 'Abzacum' is mentioned for the first time, describing a farm dating back
Audun-le-Tiche (266 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
unique in France in that its only rail link is via Luxembourg territory. The name Audun comes from Awedeux, as a phonetical evolution of Latin Aquaeducta,
Arthez-de-Béarn (84 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Pyrénées-Atlantiques department in southwestern France. It took its name from the county of Artois (Artés in Occitan, adapted in French as Arthès
Héming (58 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Moselle department in Grand Est in north-eastern France. Heming is also the name of a jewellery company located in London, after Thomas Heming who founded
Seilhan (68 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
department in southwestern France. The name Seilhan is thought to derive from an old Gallo-Roman geographical name (Caelius + anum) but seems to be associated
Saint-Moreil (31 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Creuse department in central France. It is also the place from which the local cheese takes its name. Communes of the Creuse department INSEE
Confolens (349 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
location is at the origin of its name. Confolens is also at the point where the Charente and Limousin regions meet, hence the name sometimes used to describe
Blanquefort, Gironde (682 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The white stone gave the fort the name "White Fort", in Latin Blanca Fortis, which evolved into the modern name Blanquefort. During the English occupation
Roman Catholic Diocese of Soissons (2,331 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dinechin (2015– ) The Abbey of St-Médard at Soissons, founded in 557 by Clotaire I to receive the body of St. Médard, was looked upon as the chief Benedictine
Méracq (63 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(13th century), Honerac (1538), Lo Merac (1546) and Louméracq (1863). Its name in Gascon is Lou Mérac. Communes of the Pyrénées-Atlantiques department
Aloxe-Corton (1,008 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
centuries. Before that it belonged to the Cîteaux Abbey Church of Saint-Médard from 1890 by Pinchard which replaced an ancient chapel which stood on the
Merten (27 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For people named Merten, see Merten (name). Merten is a commune in the Moselle department in Grand Est in north-eastern France. Communes of the Moselle
Chassagne-Montrachet (186 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté in eastern France. It used to be known under the name Chassagne-le-Haut, but the name was changed to Chassagne-Montrachet by a decree on November
Ballon, Charente-Maritime (512 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Martin-de-Coux Saint-Martin-de-Juillers Saint-Martin-de-Ré Saint-Médard Saint-Médard-d'Aunis Saint-Nazaire-sur-Charente Saint-Ouen Saint-Ouen-d'Aunis
Puyoô (173 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Laurent-Bretagne Saint-Martin-d'Arberoue Saint-Martin-d'Arrossa Saint-Médard Saint-Michel Saint-Palais Saint-Pé-de-Léren Saint-Pée-sur-Nivelle Saint-Pierre-d'Irube
Arrast-Larrebieu (937 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Poutou Sabalain Sagardoyburu Sallaberry Sunhary Tine The commune name in basque today is Ürrüstoi-Larrabile. Jean-Baptiste Orpustan indicated that
Aizy-Jouy (1,263 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
that are registered as historical monuments: The Parish Church of Saint-Médard (12th century). The church has several items that are registered as historical
Ardillières (736 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Martin-de-Coux Saint-Martin-de-Juillers Saint-Martin-de-Ré Saint-Médard Saint-Médard-d'Aunis Saint-Nazaire-sur-Charente Saint-Ouen Saint-Ouen-d'Aunis
Arrast-Larrebieu (937 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Poutou Sabalain Sagardoyburu Sallaberry Sunhary Tine The commune name in basque today is Ürrüstoi-Larrabile. Jean-Baptiste Orpustan indicated that
La Gonterie-Boulouneix (639 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
year 1806 the communes of Belaygue and Boulouneix were united. The modern name of La Gonterie-Boulouneix exists since 1912. Communes of the Dordogne
Aizy-Jouy (1,263 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
that are registered as historical monuments: The Parish Church of Saint-Médard (12th century). The church has several items that are registered as historical
Allas-Champagne (664 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Martin-de-Coux Saint-Martin-de-Juillers Saint-Martin-de-Ré Saint-Médard Saint-Médard-d'Aunis Saint-Nazaire-sur-Charente Saint-Ouen Saint-Ouen-d'Aunis
2009 Six Nations Championship (1,465 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
O'Driscoll was named player of the tournament, beating Italy's Sergio Parisse and Ireland teammate Paul O'Connell. O'Connell was later named captain of the
Beynac-et-Cazenac (230 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In 1827, the communes of Beynac and Cazenac were merged under the current name. Beynac A little street that connects the village of Beynac
Fouras (265 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fort Boyard, which was made famous by the French TV game show of the same name and whose character "Père Fouras" increased the celebrity of the town.
Le Bugue (268 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
times. In 964 a Benedictine monastery was founded in Le Bugue under the name of Saint Marcel and Saint Salvador.The monastery had disappeared by the late
Hasparren (52 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
commune in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques department in south-western France. The name means 'before or down the rock' in Basque. A resident of Hasparren is known
Coarraze (68 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the town of Nay it is often normally referred to with the double barreled name "Coarraze-Nay" (such as its use in "Union sportive Coarraze Nay" or the SNCF
Allas-Bocage (778 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Martin-de-Coux Saint-Martin-de-Juillers Saint-Martin-de-Ré Saint-Médard Saint-Médard-d'Aunis Saint-Nazaire-sur-Charente Saint-Ouen Saint-Ouen-d'Aunis
Arthenac (600 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Martin-de-Coux Saint-Martin-de-Juillers Saint-Martin-de-Ré Saint-Médard Saint-Médard-d'Aunis Saint-Nazaire-sur-Charente Saint-Ouen Saint-Ouen-d'Aunis
Saint-Loup, Charente-Maritime (253 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and wine. The local football (soccer) club was founded in 1936 under the name AS Trézence. In late August, it organizes tours of roads and passages of
Narp (48 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Pyrénées-Atlantiques department in south-western France. Also another name for a non-athletic regular person. Kait "Tots" Harris is a narp. Communes
Agudelle (689 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Martin-de-Coux Saint-Martin-de-Juillers Saint-Martin-de-Ré Saint-Médard Saint-Médard-d'Aunis Saint-Nazaire-sur-Charente Saint-Ouen Saint-Ouen-d'Aunis
Saint-Jammes (202 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
commune in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques department in south-western France. Its name in Béarnais is Sent-Jacme. The commune is bordered by Higuères-Souye, Gabaston
Athletics at the 1999 All-Africa Games – Men's 400 metres hurdles (48 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1 El Hefeny Ibrahim  Egypt 51.13 11 2 Edmond Nartey  Ghana 52.45 12 2 Médard Makanga  Republic of the Congo 52.60 13 2 William Loque  Guinea-Bissau
Anoye (1,725 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The commune name in Bearnais is Anoja (according to the classical norm of Occitan). Brigitte Jobbé-Duval states that the origin of the name is Latin (noda
Annezay (480 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Martin-de-Coux Saint-Martin-de-Juillers Saint-Martin-de-Ré Saint-Médard Saint-Médard-d'Aunis Saint-Nazaire-sur-Charente Saint-Ouen Saint-Ouen-d'Aunis
Anais, Charente-Maritime (763 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Martin-de-Coux Saint-Martin-de-Juillers Saint-Martin-de-Ré Saint-Médard Saint-Médard-d'Aunis Saint-Nazaire-sur-Charente Saint-Ouen Saint-Ouen-d'Aunis
Angecourt (477 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
century) is registered as an historical monument. The Church of Saint Médard contains a Funeral Plaque of Nicolas des Oudet (18th century) which is registered
Ambarès-et-Lagrave (1,811 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Martin-du-Puy Saint-Martin-Lacaussade Saint-Médard-de-Guizières Saint-Médard-d'Eyrans Saint-Médard-en-Jalles Saint-Michel-de-Castelnau Saint-Michel-de-Fronsac
Balzac, Charente (1,608 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Old forms of the name Balzac are Balazacum and Balazaco in 1298. According to Dauzat, the origin of the name Balzac dates back to a Gallo-Roman
Arc-sur-Tille (1,539 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
road east of Dijon by road D70 which continues north-west to Magny-Saint-Medard. The A31 autoroute passes through the west of the commune from north to
Saint-Amand-de-Coly (845 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
revolutionary period of the National Convention (1792-1795), was named Amand-le-Vallon. The name of the town refers to St. Amand, hermit came to evangelize
Carrière (111 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
screenwriter and actor Joseph Carrière (1795–1864), French theologian Joseph Médard Carrière (1902–1970), Canadian folklorist Larry Carriere (born 1952), Canadian
Montbrison, Loire (380 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
commune in the Loire department in central France. The commune gives its name to the popular blue cheese Fourme de Montbrison, which has been made in the
Patrick Colleter (328 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
two seasons at Cannes, Colleter left in December 2002 to play for Saint-Médard-en-Jalles before becoming a coach at Bordeaux. Paris Saint-Germain French
Périgueux (723 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of the départment. It is also the seat of a Roman Catholic diocese. The name Périgueux comes from Petrocorii, a Latinization of Celtic words meaning "the
Ars-en-Ré (1,781 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
southwestern France. Formerly called just Ars, the commune changed to its current name on 8 March 1962. The inhabitants of the commune are known as Arsais or Arsaises
Asnières-la-Giraud (753 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
registered as a historical monument. An old well The Church of Saint Medard Pierre Roy de Loulay, a French politician born on 26 August 1818 at Asnières-la-Giraud
La Nouaye (424 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
porch allowed the sick and the leprous to attend the service, hence its name "the leprous porch". The relics of the wayside cross are classified Historical
Julien Bonnaire (223 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Montauban-de-Bretagne (73 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
department in Brittany in northwestern France. Previously known as Montauban, the name was changed to Montauban-de-Bretagne in 1995. Inhabitants of Montauban-de-Bretagne
2011 Six Nations Championship (1,421 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Slam and the Triple Crown by a defeat to Ireland. Italy's Andrea Masi was named as the Six Nations Player of the Championship, becoming the first Italian
Aigurande (63 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aigurande is a commune in the Indre department in central France. The town's name derives from the Gallic word "Equoranda", which refers to a river or stream
Saint-Héand (68 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Loire department in central France, 12 kilometres from Saint-Étienne. The name Héand comes from Latin Eugendus; and was given to the town either by the
AS Mangasport (134 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mangasport Full name Association Sportive Mangasport Founded 1962 Ground Stade Henri Sylvoz, Moanda, Gabon Ground Capacity 4,000 Manager Médard Lisadusu League
Saint-Aubin-du-Pavail (348 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
in the Ille-et-Vilaine department in Brittany in northwestern France. The name Saint-Aubin-du-Pavail comes from Saint Aubin, bishop of Angers in the 6th
Julien Pierre (95 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
attack". The Local. Retrieved 20 July 2014.  (French) Clermont Auvergne profile (French) France profile Rugby: France name 10 new caps to face All Blacks
Schweyen (117 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
acres). It was first mentioned in 1322 under the name of "Schweien", which comes from the Old German name "Schweiga", which meant "cow" or "cattle". Today
Lormont (2,154 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thus, it is a member of the metropolitan Urban Community of Bordeaux. The name Lormont comes from "Laureamontus" or "Laureomonte". The "laurier" (laurel)
La Terrasse-sur-Dorlay (93 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Loire department in central France. La Terrasse-sur-Dorlay takes its name from the Dorlay river, a tributary of the Gier, which flows through the commune
Firminy (159 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Étienne by rail. The ancient name of the town was Firminiaco or Firminiacus (lit. "place of Firmin"). The name was first recorded in a 971 charter
List of heads of state of Chad (50 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kebzabo National Union for Democracy and Renewal 12.80 Laoukein Kourayo Médard 10.69 Djimrangar Dadnadji 5.06 Malloum Yoboide Djeraki 1.84 Mahamat
Martigné-Ferchaud (364 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Brittany in northwestern France. The name "Martigné" is thought to date from the Gallo-Roman period, the place being named after the first Roman governor of
Saint-Loup-Lamairé (116 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
former communes: Saint-Loup-sur-Thouet and Lamairé. As indicated by its name, the village of Saint-Loup-sur-Thouet is situated on the River Thouet. The
Asasp-Arros (1,785 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Serre-Sècque (Pass - 509 metres) Soum Artigue Tachouas Termy (Forest) The name Asasp appears in the forms: Asap (1364, Fors de Béarn), Azasp (1375, Contracts
Aurélien Rougerie (169 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
2016 Six Nations Championship (2,218 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
victory for France. Ireland had led 9–3 from before half-time, but Maxime Médard's 69th minute converted try proved to be the winner. Another comeback later
Asasp-Arros (1,785 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Serre-Sècque (Pass - 509 metres) Soum Artigue Tachouas Termy (Forest) The name Asasp appears in the forms: Asap (1364, Fors de Béarn), Azasp (1375, Contracts
Cerizay (162 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Deux-Sèvres department in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine region in western France. The name Cerizay probably originated during the closing centuries of the Roman occupation
Annepont (913 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
place name so that the etymology of Annepont remains hypothetical. Albert Dauzat saw a compound of the elements Anna, a Germanic personal name, followed
Eauze (148 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
united with the episcopal see of Auch probably in the 9th century. Its Latin name, Elusa, is identical to that of a titular see of Palaestina Tertia, suffragan
Sporting Clube de Cabinda (157 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nat Technical Position Albano César Head Coach Médard Lusadisu Head Coach Emená Kwazambi Assistant Coach
Luzech (1,748 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
many projects are underway to advance it. The place name Luzech could be based on Gallic names such as Lucetios, Luteus or Lutos followed by -ecia 1
Azay-le-Ferron (154 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of the historic province of Berry and Touraine. Azay-Le-Ferron takes its name from ironworks, from which iron was extracted as late as the nineteenth century
Schorbach (324 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
themselves as Schorbachois, and are also known by the sobriquet Wurschtfresser, a name that refers to the annual Wurschtfescht (sausage feast) that is celebrated
Sansan, Gers (100 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Latin patronymic name Sancianus or Santius, followed by the suffix -anum, designing a property of which a man by this name must have been the owner
Bergerac, Dordogne (412 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
two statues of Cyrano de Bergerac, subject of a famous play of the same name by Edmond Rostand, though the actual Cyrano never lived in Bergerac. An old
AS Pélican (39 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
AS Pélican Full name Association Sportive Pélican Ground Stade Jean Koumou, Lambaréné, Gabon Manager Médard Lisadusu League Gabon Championnat National
Cherveux (855 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Roman period : Some vestiges attest that the Romans occupied some places The name of Cherveux : is of Celtic origin, which would indicate that the area originated
Preignan (443 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
River. The origin of the name is uncertain. It may be anthroponymic, derived from either the Latin name Prineus, Premius or Priscus. The village
Lignac (346 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
commune's eastern border. The name Lignac is probably of Roman origin. During the Roman occupation a wealthy landowner named Linius apparently lived in the
Saint-Avit-Sénieur (1,220 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
been erected to honour the hermit Avitus, who died in 570. Avitus gave his name to the abbey and the village. The abbey used to house canons, disciples of
Aignes-et-Puypéroux (1,972 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
some importance: Puypéroux in the far north where the abbey of the same name Chez Jambon, in the south of the commune Chez Boucher, in the western part
Archiac (800 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Martin-de-Coux Saint-Martin-de-Juillers Saint-Martin-de-Ré Saint-Médard Saint-Médard-d'Aunis Saint-Nazaire-sur-Charente Saint-Ouen Saint-Ouen-d'Aunis
Saint-Régis-du-Coin (226 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
created from plots taken at the town of Marlhes and Saint-Sauveur-en-Rue. Its name comes from a locality called "The Corner" located on this time, near the
Mairé-Levescault (325 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
with Mairé, in the same general area). The history and derivation of the name of Mairé-L'Evescault are closely linked to that of Saint Junian (Junien)
Assier (5,011 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
these are:. The Ruisseau de l'Homme has its source near the Chapel of Saint-Médard (in the Issepts commune). It flows towards the two Pertes d'Assier sinkholes:
Magny (240 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nièvre department Magny-Montarlot, in the Côte-d'Or department Magny-Saint-Médard, in the Côte-d'Or department Magny-sur-Tille, in the Côte-d'Or department
Pardies (45 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Laurent-Bretagne Saint-Martin-d'Arberoue Saint-Martin-d'Arrossa Saint-Médard Saint-Michel Saint-Palais Saint-Pé-de-Léren Saint-Pée-sur-Nivelle Saint-Pierre-d'Irube
Przyjaciel coat of arms (325 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
archaeologist and researcher of inscriptions in the Etruscan language Medard Downarowicz, political activist and minister Andrzej Downarowicz, podstarosta
Hampont (55 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(1892–1943) was born here in 1892. The town was formally known by the German name Hudingen between 1915–18 and Hüdingen over 1940 and 1944. Communes of the
Buhl-Lorraine (65 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Est in northeastern France. The village is located in Lorraine, as its name suggests, more specifically in South Moselle. Buhl-Lorraine is located 3
Ambernac (1,826 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
hamlet of Breuil takes its name from the Low Latin brogilum of the Gallic origin brogilos meaning "small wood". The name of Clermont refers to a hill
Gaël (682 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
see Gaël (given name) for the given name Gaël (Gallo: Gaèu) is a commune in the Ille-et-Vilaine department in Brittany in northwestern France. It lies
La Rochette (82 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Savoie département La Rochette-du-Buis, in the Drôme département Saint-Médard-la-Rochette, in the Creuse département Thoré-la-Rochette, in the Loir-et-Cher
Ornézan (128 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
origin in the Latin patronymic name Ornatius, followed by the suffix -anum, designing a property of which a man named Ornatius must have been the owner
Sainte-Marie-aux-Chênes (63 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Moselle department in Grand Est in north-eastern France. The town's name means "Saint Mary at the oaks" in French, and the town's coat of arms can
Alexis Palisson (238 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Gravelotte (178 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "article name needed". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. 
Balansun (810 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
name is the Gascon Latin name of a man Valentius with the suffix -unum. The following table details the origins of the commune name and other names in
Biriatou (139 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Xoldokogaina. European road carriers and travellers are acquainted with the name, Basque for 'gate/pass of the way' (bide + ate), on account of the border
Morgan Parra (280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Maxime (205 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
footballer Maxime Faget, an inventor Maxime Le Forestier, French singer Maxime Médard, French Rugby Union player Maxime Monfort, Belgian racing cyclist Maxime
Löllbach (5,682 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
which likewise lie within the Bad Kreuznach district, the municipalities of Medard and Kappeln, which lie in the neighbouring Kusel district, and the municipality
Dallon (53 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and the canal Saint-Quentin. Its former name is Dalonaie, on record in the year 1035. Eglise Saint Medard Calvary Communes of the Aisne department
Brax, Haute-Garonne (114 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Lys Saint-Mamet Saint-Marcel-Paulel Saint-Marcet Saint-Martory Saint-Médard Saint-Michel Saint-Orens-de-Gameville Saint-Paul-d'Oueil Saint-Paul-sur-Save
Champdieu (156 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
eventually passed the fief on to this nephew Vido of Champdieu. The town and name of Champdieu evolved in the course of ages. First of all CANDICUS (Roman
Monein (91 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Laurent-Bretagne Saint-Martin-d'Arberoue Saint-Martin-d'Arrossa Saint-Médard Saint-Michel Saint-Palais Saint-Pé-de-Léren Saint-Pée-sur-Nivelle Saint-Pierre-d'Irube
Hettange-Grande (128 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Moselle department in Grand Est in north-eastern France. The town gave its name to the Hettangian, the earliest age of the Jurassic period of the geologic
Raphaël Lakafia (124 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Mattawa, Ontario (1,464 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Brébeuf in 1626, Gabriel Lallemant in 1648, Pierre-Esprit Radisson and Médard des Groseilliers in 1658, La Verendrye in 1731, Alexander MacKenzie in 1794
Niederalben (4,231 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
pastors from Offenbach, Herren-Sulzbach and Medard. Since 1991, the two ecclesiastical communities of Medard and Niederalben, which lie 15 km away from
Bressuire (393 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ruins in Poitou. The name "Bressuire" comes from two elements, being Berg (hill) and Durum (fortress). These two are linked in the name "Berzoriacum" recorded
Heining-lès-Bouzonville (102 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
north-eastern France. It is just 500m from the border with Germany. It takes its name from the Abbey of Bouzonville. It was variously in the ownership of the Abbey
Aressy (837 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saligat Its name in Bearnais is Aressi (according to the classical norm of Occitan). Brigitte Jobbé-Duval indicates that the place name could come from
Fabien Barcella (234 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Barraute-Camu (866 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
corner of this article. The commune name in Occitan Gascon is Berrauta-Camun. Michel Grosclaude said that the name comes from the basque berro: Broussailles
Les Salles (754 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
on the origin of the name - To Dauzat name comes from the Germanic word "Saal" room - Similarly for Louis Pierre Augereau, the name comes from the word
Chlorite group (770 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and Sons, New York ISBN 0-471-80580-7 Grove, T; Chatterjee, N; Parman, S; Medard, E (2006). "The influence of H2O on mantle wedge melting". Earth and Planetary
Cognac, France (988 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
churches as well as several châteaux. Main article: Cognac The town gives its name to one of the world's best-known types of brandy or eau de vie. Drinks must
Saint-Rustice (58 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ancient Roman mosaics which were discovered in 1833. The city takes its name from Rusticus, a bishop of Cahors, who was murdered in 630. Gallo-Roman
Lionel Nallet (337 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Springboks. In 2008, following the retirement of Raphael Ibanez, he was named as captain of the French side. On 30 April 2009, it was announced that Nallet
Lahourcade (41 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Laurent-Bretagne Saint-Martin-d'Arberoue Saint-Martin-d'Arrossa Saint-Médard Saint-Michel Saint-Palais Saint-Pé-de-Léren Saint-Pée-sur-Nivelle Saint-Pierre-d'Irube
Ambleville, Charente (3,379 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
is usually the case, a Germanic personal name. It can be Ambla - a woman's name, or Amblinus - a man's name, or alternatively Amelinus. These anthroponyms
Bastanès (879 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
this article. The commune name in Gascon Occitan is also Bastanès. According to Michel Grosclaude the name comes from the gascon basta meaning
Angeac-Champagne (2,224 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Salles in district of Cognac and the Charente department. In 1801 it took the name of Champagne and was attached to the Canton de Segonzac. The Roissac railway
Fabrice Estebanez (200 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Anais, Charente (1,105 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
l'Étang which has its source in the north with the river Argence taking its name downstream of the town. The Fountaine de Maillou at the southern border near
Salies-de-Béarn (87 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
commune in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques department in south-western France. The name comes from its naturally occurring saline water (Gascon salias for Standard
Saint-Pée-sur-Nivelle (117 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
several neighbourhoods, with a main nucleus located at a crossroads. As its name in French conveys, the village is located on the river Nivelle. The village
La Celle-Dunoise (178 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1154, a document mentions the name of Ecclesia Cella, which by 1339 had become Ecclesia de Cella dunensi, giving the name of the village today. A castle
Saint-Mont (129 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
created in 1981, was previously called Côtes de Saint-Mont, before the name was changed in 2007. The vineyards have a surface of 785 hectares, the VDQS
Saint-Paul-la-Roche (1,353 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
integrated into the Regional Natural Parc Périgord Limousin. The commune's name is derived from Saint Paul and the hamlet La Roche (the rock) referring to
Neuvy-Saint-Sépulchre (278 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
France. The town takes its name from its basilica which is a replica of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. The name of the town is written with
Saint-Blancard (504 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the agriculture. The office of nine communes united under the name Les Hautes Vallees, is located in the village. The inhabitants are called
Ostabat-Asme (194 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
it was thus located in the former province of Lower Navarre. It gives its name to the region of Ostabarret. Communes of the Pyrénées-Atlantiques department
Masseube (226 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
France. Masseube ("The farmhouse of the forest") was originally the name of a farm belonging to Escaladieu Abbey, in Bigorre. In 1274, the Abbey and
Lescar (205 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Benearnum, Beneharnum or Civitas Benarnensium, the location providing the name for the later region of Béarn. In 841, Benearnum was razed by the Vikings
Angous (862 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(ruins) Olive Parfouby Poumirau Pucheu Serbielle Serrot Trouilh The commune name in Gascon is Angós which means "marshy terrain" according to Michel Grosclaude
La Tremblade (1,593 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
department and Nouvelle-Aquitaine region in south-western France. The name of the town probably derives from the presence of aspen trees [French: "tremblers"]
Navarrenx (873 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
called to join the association Les Plus Beaux Villages de France. The name Navarrenx comes from sponda Navarrensi, meaning the "bedstead of Navarre
Abbécourt (1,780 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1224). The commune developed from the Abbey Saint-Médard de Soissons, which also gave its name to a farm located within the commune. The earliest historical
Anos (761 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gallic origin being the name of the property owner Andus plus the suffix -ossu with a proposed meaning of "Domain of Andus". The name Anos was mentioned in
Chequamegon Bay (680 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wisconsin to have been occupied by European men. Two French fur traders, Médard des Groseilliers and Pierre-Esprit Radisson, built a hut somewhere on the
Auge (disambiguation) (71 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
a German football player Auge, Ardennes, France Auge, Creuse, France Augé, Deux-Sèvres, France Auge-Saint-Médard, in the Charente département, France
Arces (2,202 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arces, commonly identified under the name Arces-sur-Gironde, is a commune in the Charente-Maritime department in southwestern France. Its residents are
Bernard Courtois (765 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
pharmacien de l'Academie. When Courtois was twelve the family moved to the Saint-Medard Nitrary, an experimental nitrate plant which Jean-Baptiste bought from Louis-Bernard
Pomps (164 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Castillon (Canton d'Arthez-de-Béarn) to the southwest Doazon to the south The name of the commune of Pomps has appeared throughout time as Poms in the 14th
Barbazan, Haute-Garonne (623 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Lys Saint-Mamet Saint-Marcel-Paulel Saint-Marcet Saint-Martory Saint-Médard Saint-Michel Saint-Orens-de-Gameville Saint-Paul-d'Oueil Saint-Paul-sur-Save
Agris (1,993 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
local dialect (to the West). There are two hypotheses for the origin of the name Agris: Agris comes from the Latin Acrisium fundum or villa Acrisii meaning
Avelanges (377 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
commune has extensive forests mixed with smaller areas of farmland. The name was Arclenglis or Avelengiis in 1028, Avallangiae in 1244, and Avelanges
Guéthary (186 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
whales in the 13th century. Actually, the linguist Henri Gavel put down the name of the town to the Gascon word getari, 'post for watching' (the whales),
Dol-de-Bretagne (701 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(Breton: Dol, Gallo: Dóu), cited in most historical records under its Breton name of Dol, is a commune in the Ille-et-Vilaine département in Brittany in northwestern
Ballans (1,270 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
communes (24 metres or lower). The climate is oceanic Aquitaine. The name Ballans is of Celtic origin meaning "low land". It was in Ballans that Richard
Jean-Baptiste Poux (118 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Guilhem Guirado (356 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Artigueloutan (1,061 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
des lois). Its name in béarnais is Artigalotan (according to the classical norm of Occitan). According to Michel Grosclaude the name comes from the Gascon
Bruz (203 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
municipality signed the Ya d'ar brezhoneg charter on 1 October 2011. The Breton name of the commune is also Bruz. Communes of the Ille-et-Vilaine department
Agnicourt-et-Séchelles (484 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
counting and municipal population from 2006) Church of Saint-Médard at Agnicourt (12th century) Chapel of Saint Agapit at Séchelles. In
Mézières-sur-Couesnon (122 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
northeast of Rennes and 42 km (26 mi) south of Mont Saint-Michel. As its name indicates, it is situated on the Couesnon River. The bordering communes are
Baliros (759 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Domain of Valerus". The following table details the origins of the commune name. Sources: Grosclaude: Toponymic Dictionary of communes, Béarn, 2006 (French)
Abère (1,053 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Courde Crouquet Hourcade Labat Larré Piarrette Salabert La Teulère The name Abère was mentioned in the tenth century (according to Pierre de Marca) and
Issoudun (528 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
region of France. It is also referred to as Issoundun, which is the ancient name. Issoudun is a sub-prefecture, located in the east of the Indre department
Saint-Coulomb (169 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
northwestern France. Inhabitants are called colombanais in French. Its name comes from Saint Colomban, who came in the years 580 - 590. Accompanied by
Bédée (763 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
2009. The name of Bédée would come from the Gaulish "Bedo" (= pit) or "betu" (= birch) and the suffix -iscum. The transcription of the name has changed:
Meursault (348 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
above the village. The name of Meursault derives from muris saltus, the "mouse-leap" stream of the Ruisseau des Cloux, so named by the Roman soldiers.
Feurs (903 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Feurs are called Foréziens. The city was founded by the Romans. The name Feurs is a contraction of Segusiavorum Forum. With a forum the Gallo-Roman
Chambolle-Musigny (510 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
communes of France which added or adopted the name of their best-known vineyard as a suffix to the original name of the village. Main article: Chambolle-Musigny
Maxime Mermoz (206 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Balbigny (232 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Loire department in central France. Balbigny owes its name to a Roman general named Balbinius who based himself here in order to conduct a war.
Saint-Gaudens, Haute-Garonne (525 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
occupation) and was originally called Mas-Saint-Pierre, before taking the name of the young shepherd, Gaudens, martyred by the Visigoths at the end of the
Bassillon-Vauzé (1,043 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
this article. Michel Grosclaude said that Bassillon comes from the Latin name Bassilius with the suffix -onem, giving "Domain of Bassius". The origin of
Arricau-Bordes (1,066 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Séglères Tisné Val Pré The commune name in béarnais is Arricau-Bordas. According to Michel Grosclaude the name Arricau was formed from two Gascon terms:
Saint-Lunaire (917 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
authorities established the first modern municipality with the name of "Port-Lunaire". This name lasted until 1803 when it was definitively changed to "Saint-Lunaire"
Les Basques RCM (194 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
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La Souterraine (236 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
unearthed. In medieval times, a church and fortified walls were built. The name of the town, translating as ‘subterranean’, comes from the underground parts
Pommard (240 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the name of Pommard was made famous as a marketplace for wines from better areas, in the days before Appellation Controlee. The fact that its name is easy
Argenton-sur-Creuse (250 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the north. The site has been developed as a museum visitor attraction. The name of the ancient town probably derives from the Latin word for "silver", as
Sainte-Néomaye (370 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and its own particularities. A legend says that Sainte-Neomaye takes his name from a young a very virtuous woman, Neomaye, who was promised, against her
Condom, Gers (553 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
mayor, taking advantage of the incidental relationship between the town's name and the English word, opened a museum of contraceptives, which closed in
Abzac, Charente (2,702 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the department. The name Abzac has been attested in the forms Absacum in the 14th century and Azat in the 17th century. The name Abzac is derived from
Baigts-de-Béarn (1,027 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tilhète Toucayré Touriangle (château) The commune name in béarnais is Vaths de Bearn. The name Baigts means "valley" in Gascon but, according to Michel
Gentioux-Pigerolles (253 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
most famous one is located in Gentioux. Below the column which lists the name of the fallen, stands an orphan in bronze pointing to an inscription ‘Maudite
La Forêt-du-Temple (109 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Notre-Dame, dating from the twelfth century. A war memorial, including the name of a woman who died of grief after her three sons were killed in World War
Saint-Briac-sur-Mer (604 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
one 18 hole golf course, and more than 5 restaurants. The name St Briac comes from the name of Saint Briac, an Irishman. Briac arrived from Ireland with
Angoulins (1,223 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Martin-de-Coux Saint-Martin-de-Juillers Saint-Martin-de-Ré Saint-Médard Saint-Médard-d'Aunis Saint-Nazaire-sur-Charente Saint-Ouen Saint-Ouen-d'Aunis
Saugues (328 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jacques de Langlade, both canons of the local collegiate church of Saint Médard, the Royal Notary Jacques de Langlade, the bourgeois Benoît Paparic, and
Angliers, Charente-Maritime (1,257 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Martin-de-Coux Saint-Martin-de-Juillers Saint-Martin-de-Ré Saint-Médard Saint-Médard-d'Aunis Saint-Nazaire-sur-Charente Saint-Ouen Saint-Ouen-d'Aunis
Aubeterre-sur-Dronne (3,231 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
spread between the valley of the Dronne and the top of the hill. The name Aubeterre is derived from Albaterra which dates to 1004. Alba Terra means
Aincille (1,057 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The commune name in basque is Ahintzila meaning "hill of mud", Aintzila or Aintzil-Harrieta. Jean-Baptiste Orpustan wrote the name of the commune in
Aubous (1,180 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tapounet Troucat The commune name in béarnais is Aubons. Michel Grosclaude proposed an etymology from the Latin man's name Albus with the suffix -ones
Flavigny-sur-Ozerain (718 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
written mention of the village of Flavigny was in the Latin form of its name, Flaviniacum, which appears in the cartulary (or charter) of the Benedictine
Alise-Sainte-Reine (3,184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the commune. Because of its identification with Alesia the origin of the name of Alise-Sainte-Reine has been the subject of numerous studies. Several ideas
Andilly, Charente-Maritime (833 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Martin-de-Coux Saint-Martin-de-Juillers Saint-Martin-de-Ré Saint-Médard Saint-Médard-d'Aunis Saint-Nazaire-sur-Charente Saint-Ouen Saint-Ouen-d'Aunis
Authon-Ébéon (1,626 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Martin-de-Coux Saint-Martin-de-Juillers Saint-Martin-de-Ré Saint-Médard Saint-Médard-d'Aunis Saint-Nazaire-sur-Charente Saint-Ouen Saint-Ouen-d'Aunis
Lys, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (310 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Louvie-Juzon to the south The name Lys appears as Lis-Sainte-Colomme (Lily Saint Colomme) from the 1721 census. The name comes from Gascony, and means
Labège (464 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Escalquens, Castanet-Tolosan, Auzeville-Tolosane, and Ramonville-Saint-Agne. The name "Labège" may be derived from La Berge ("The Bank") because of the town's
Sarpourenx (349 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
profit of an influential local), administered by the viscounts of Béarn. The name "Sarpourenx" is also historically attested in the variant forms "Sarporencx"
Tesson (2,930 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
department in southwestern France. According to a widespread theory, that name, which is not unique to this particular commune, is a distortion, in the
Arnos (529 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pédoussau Péré Péruilh Péruillet Pétrou Poey (ruins) Saintong Sansot The name Arnos appears in the form Arnas on the Cassini Map. In the 16th century
List of French monarchs (2,467 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
which ruled after 1328, however, are generally given the specific branch names of Valois (until 1589) and Bourbon (until 1848). During the brief period
Lanneplaà (360 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Laurent-Bretagne Saint-Martin-d'Arberoue Saint-Martin-d'Arrossa Saint-Médard Saint-Michel Saint-Palais Saint-Pé-de-Léren Saint-Pée-sur-Nivelle Saint-Pierre-d'Irube
Théâtre de l'Ambigu-Comique (1,347 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Temple, originally known as the Promenades des Ramparts, in Paris by Nicolas-Médard Audinot, formerly a comedian of the Opéra-Comique, which he had left to
Vieux-Vy-sur-Couesnon (321 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sens-de-Bretagne. The name Vieux-Vy-sur-Couesnon probably comes from the Latin Vetus Victus, "old market town." The settlement has had this name since at least
Aigre (2,210 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
meaning that the village was built around the property of a rich Gallo-Roman named Acrius. At the end of the 13th century Aigre appears in the form Acriacis
Cherrueix (1,116 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
is an old coastal road, including a branch, east of the town produced the name of a place called Lower Road, which passes 2.7 km west of the village to
Les Adjots (1,093 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ansac-sur-Vienne Anville Ars Asnières-sur-Nouère Aubeterre-sur-Dronne Auge-Saint-Médard Aunac Aussac-Vadalle Baignes-Sainte-Radegonde Balzac Barbezières Barbezieux-Saint-Hilaire
Ambérac (1,500 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ansac-sur-Vienne Anville Ars Asnières-sur-Nouère Aubeterre-sur-Dronne Auge-Saint-Médard Aunac Aussac-Vadalle Baignes-Sainte-Radegonde Balzac Barbezières Barbezieux-Saint-Hilaire
Creutzwald (171 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wilhelmsbronn. It continued to be known as Creutzwald-la-Croix until 1961, when the name was simplified. Until that point, it had been redundant, as the German word
Redon, Ille-et-Vilaine (362 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
however it would seem that there was a parish by the name of Riedones which gave the town its name. In 832, Conwoion, a Breton monk with the help of the
Alos-Sibas-Abense (1,028 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
suggests that Oniz is the name of a noble Basque family. The following table details the origins of the commune name and other names in the commune. Sources:
Baignes-Sainte-Radegonde (2,811 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
forms of the name are: Cathmeriacum, a name possibly of Celtic origin, before the 8th century when the abbey was founded which the monks named Beania (feminine
Baerenthal (1,392 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
October 1291. The village of Baerenthal was mentioned later in 1318, under the name Berendal, in the valley of Bero. Regarding secular power, Baerenthal was
Macamic, Quebec (499 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Royal-Roussillon-et-Poularies, named after the Royal-Roussillon Regiment of Montcalm's army and after lieutenant-colonel François-Médard de Poularies, commander
Name days in Hungary (26 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a calendar of name days in Hungary. Sortable Hungarian name days list - this is a sortable list allowing one to list alphabetically or
Anhaux (1,627 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Despite sounding Basque, the name of this village seems to defy all analysis. The oldest document known on which the name Anhaux appears is now the cartulary
Auch (483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For the bird, see great auk. For the European surname, see Auch (name). Auch (French pronunciation: ​[oʃ]; Gascon: Aush or Aux [aʊʃ]) is a commune in southwestern
Puligny-Montrachet (332 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Puligny and Chassagne now officially append the name of their most famous vineyard to their own names. Wines from the Chassagne side are called "Le Montrachet"
Auch (483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For the bird, see great auk. For the European surname, see Auch (name). Auch (French pronunciation: ​[oʃ]; Gascon: Aush or Aux [aʊʃ]) is a commune in southwestern
Bordeaux (7,210 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
tribe, the Bituriges Vivisci, who named the town Burdigala, probably of Aquitanian origin. The name Bourde is still the name of a river south of the city.
Dimitri Yachvili (361 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Arrien (951 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Its name in béarnais is Arrien. Michel Grosclaude indicated that the origin of the name is obscure and mentioned the possibility of the name of a former
Millenarianism (1,312 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christian Israelite Church Cult of the Holy Spirit Convulsionnaires of Saint-Médard Dulcinianism Earth Changes L'Encobert Fifth Empire Fifth Monarchy Men Ghost
Arbonne (1,271 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tribulenea Xantxienea Xokobia Ziburria Ziburriako Errota The commune name in Basque is Arbona. Brigitte Jobbé-Duval indicated that 'Arbona meant "place
Accous (2,316 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
lois). The name of the commune in Gascon is Acós. Brigitte Jobbé-Duval hypothesises that Accous originated from Acca or Acco, a woman's name mentioned
Langon, Ille-et-Vilaine (749 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
that of the Abbey of Redon. It is in the records of this Abbey that the name of the parish is written using various Latin spellings ("Langedon", "Langeco"
Auxant (455 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Autevielle-Saint-Martin-Bideren (957 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Petit Saint-Martin The name Autevielle in béarnais is Autivièla. The name Bideren in béarnais is Vidèren. For the name Autevielle Michel Grosclaude
MFK Dubnica (518 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
B Had international caps for their respective countries. Players whose name is listed in bold represented their countries while playing for MFK. Past
Imanol Harinordoquy (597 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Source-Seine (317 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Source-Seine is located 30 kilometres (19 mi) northwest of Dijon. True to its name, within Source-Seine is the source of the Seine, in woods off the D103 road
Allerey (490 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Antichan-de-Frontignes (451 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Lys Saint-Mamet Saint-Marcel-Paulel Saint-Marcet Saint-Martory Saint-Médard Saint-Michel Saint-Orens-de-Gameville Saint-Paul-d'Oueil Saint-Paul-sur-Save
Armendarits (1,101 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Zedarria The commune name in Basque is Armendaritze. The following table details the origins of the commune name and other names in the commune. Sources:
Hayange (230 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
During the early Medieval period the town was known as "Heiyingen Villa", a name indicating a settlement within a forested area. The first mention of the
Arros-de-Nay (1,190 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the plurality of the name Arros in the department (Arros Canton of Nay, Arros Canton of Oloron), decided to associate the name of the chief town of the
Recovery School District (838 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
were taken over by the state, and turned over to charter school operators: Medard Nelson, Samuel Green, Phillips, and Sophie B. Wright. Hurricane Katrina
Amendeuix-Oneix (1,353 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Peco-Berthoua Postateya Sabrenia Salla Vivienborda The current Basque name is Amendüze-Unaso. Jean-Baptiste Orpustan suggested that Oneix means the
Bining (213 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bining was referred to in 1351 as Biningen, after Bino, a Germanic man's name. The village formed part of the manor of Bitche, and in the mid-14th Century
Auriac, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (988 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The commune name in béarnais is Auriac. Michel Grosclaude said that the name probably comes from the Latin man's name Aurius with the Gallo-Roman
Arzacq-Arraziguet (1,788 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and Arzac on the Cassini Map in 1750 Its name in béarnais is Arsac. The name is of Gallo-Roman origin - the name of a former owner ("Domain of Arsius")
Aisy-sous-Thil (534 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Barcus (1,749 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
however, show the extent of nor any information on the commune. The commune name in Basque is Barkoxe. Jean-Baptiste Orpustan proposes a Basque etymological
Naturalis Biodiversity Center (1,309 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
naturalists, including the following: Heinrich Boie (1794‐1827) Pierre-Médard Diard (1794‐1863) Eltio Alegondas Forsten (1811‐1843) Johan Coenraad van
Avot, Côte-d'Or (420 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Aubertin (2,107 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Among the hypotheses on the origin of the name Aubertin, Michel Grosclaude favours that of a Gascon man's name (diminutive of Aubert) or the Latin Albertinus
Antheuil (433 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
2013 European Fencing Championships (66 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Szabo Benedikt Wagner  Germany 6. Vincent Anstett Boladé Apithy Julien Médard Nicolas Rousset  France 7. Kamil Ibragimov Nikolay Kovalev Veniamin Reshetnikov
Rombas (266 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the 5th century. The town went through several name changes over the course of history, it has been named Romesbach in 972, Romabach in 984, Rumesbach in
James Bay (1,813 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
into Canada. The fur-trapping duo of explorers Pierre-Esprit Radisson and Médard des Groseilliers convinced the English Crown, primarily Prince Rupert of
Marsannay-la-Côte (246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Barges, Côte-d'Or (498 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Fixin (129 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Sillegny (392 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Pierre, and one century later to the Bishopric of Metz. In 1226 the name of the town changed and became Sulincium. In 1246 the bishop Jacques ceded
Arrans (410 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Saintes, Charente-Maritime (2,353 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saintes was known as Mediolanum Santonum, and during much of its history, the name of the city was spelled Xaintes and Xainctes. Primarily built on the left
Hudson Bay Railway (1997) (524 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Wheat Board. The line was constructed by an earlier company of the same name. The Hudson Bay Railway was built starting in the early 1900s under Canadian
Surgères (2,287 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Marais Poitevin and east of the ancient province of Aunis. The town's name came from the Gères., the stream that runs through it. It empties into the
François Trinh-Duc (533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
L'Union (272 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
with at the commune troops under the command of the Duke of Wellington. The name Saint-Jean-de-l'Union is still spoken of, recalling the time when the communes
Aulnay, Charente-Maritime (2,344 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
castle which was demolished in 1818 but whose tower still remains. A common name for Aulnay is Aulnay-de-Saintonge but under the Ancien Régime Aulnay (often
Baliracq-Maumusson (1,296 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sansot Tardan According to Michel Grosclaude the name Baliracq probably came from a Latin man's name Valerus with the Gallo-Roman suffix -acum giving
Hilduin (553 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
to which were added later the Abbey of St-Germain des Prés, Abbey of St-Médard in Soissons, and Abbey of St-Ouen. Louis the Pious appointed him his archchaplain
Aubaine, Côte-d'Or (1,007 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
on the name of the person Albanus". Father Bredault thought, to the contrary, that Aubaine came from the word Alb meaning "mountain". The name Bécoup
Cubzac-les-Ponts (3,122 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Cupitius, a wealthy landowner of the Gallo-Roman era, from which the name Cubzac derives. The first ferries crossing the Dordogne were flat-bottomed
William Servat (398 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Bourgault (613 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bourgault-Ducoudray French composer, pianist, and professor of music history/theory Médard Bourgault - Quebecer sculptor Jonathan Beaulieu-Bourgault - Canadian professional
Arudy (1,963 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(530 mètres) Vignau Le Zoum The commune name in béarnais is Arudi. According to Michel Grosclaude the name comes from the basque harr ("stone" or "rock")
Ainhice-Mongelos (1,129 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mongelos is a Gascon name meaning Mont Jaloux (Mount Jealous). The following table details the origins of the commune name and other names in the commune.
William Servat (398 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Aldudes (1,555 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Turrieta Uhaldéa Urrichka Zelhaybeguia The name of the commune in Basque is Aldude. Aldudes was also the name given to the entire valley bordering the Baigorry
Aren (1,040 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The commune name in béarnais is also Aren. Brigitte Jobbé-Duval indicated that the toponym Aren probably means domain of Arrius, the name of a former
Bourgault (613 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bourgault-Ducoudray French composer, pianist, and professor of music history/theory Médard Bourgault - Quebecer sculptor Jonathan Beaulieu-Bourgault - Canadian professional
Araujuzon (984 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Souleret Trescassous The name of the commune in Béarnese is Araus-Juzon (according to classical norm of Occitan). The commune name in Gascon is Lajuson.
Sarreguemines (553 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sarregueminois and Sarregueminoises. Sarreguemines, whose name is a French spelling of the name in local Lorraine-German dialect "Saargemin", meaning "confluence
Sauveterre-de-Béarn (277 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
in the Trevanian (aka Rod Whitaker) novel The Summer of Katya under the name Alos. In the book, it is where the Festival of the Drowned Virgin takes place
La Bastide-Clairence (1,756 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
longitude) in the top right hand corner of this article. The commune name in Basque is Bastida or Bastida Arberoa and in Gascon Occitan is La Bastida
Banca, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (1,460 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Zubiarinzahar Zumazoko The commune name in Basque is Banka. For John-Baptiste Orpustan, the origin of the name Banca can have two interpretations: one
Aste-Béon (1,162 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
commune name in béarnais is Asta-Bion. Michel Grosclaude said that the name Aste comes from the basque aitz/as ("rocky point"). He suggested that the name Béon
Aubigny-en-Plaine (552 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of the commune are known as Albineyais or Albineyaises. from the original name of the commune of Albineyum in the 13th century. Aubigny-en-Plaine is located
Aramits (1,309 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
grenouilles (frogs) - a name for the inhabitants of wetlands). The following table details the origins of the commune name and other names in the commune. Sources:
November 16 (3,481 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
model 1986 – Aleksei Anatolyevich Kozlov, Russian footballer 1986 – Maxime Médard, French rugby player 1987 – Eitan Tibi, Israeli footballer 1987 – Jordan
Aast, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (1,178 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Assouste to form the new commune of Eaux-Bonnes. The commune's Béarnais name is also Aast. According to Dauzat and Rostaing Aast comes from the Basque
Aydie (1,443 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
commune name in béarnais is Aidia. Michel Grosclaude said that the name probably has a common root with Aydius but the origin and meaning of the name remains
Aurions-Idernes (1,134 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tétour The commune name in béarnais is Aurions-Idèrnas. Michel Grosclaude indicated that Aurions is probably from the Latin man's name Aurius with the suffix
Andoins (1,423 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The commune name in béarnais is Andonsh. (according to the classical norm of Occitan). Brigitte Jobbé-Duval indicates that the village's name probably comes
Auterrive (1,161 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Minoterie Noutary Terrenabe The commune name in béarnais is Autarriba. For Michel Grosclaude the origin of the name is unquestionably Gascon, auta arriba
Andrein (869 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
commune name in Béarnese dialect and in Gascon Occitan is Andrenh. Brigitte Jobbé-Duval indicated that the name actually came from the family name Andréas
Cédric Heymans (331 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
missing out on selection for the 2011 Six Nations Championship, Heymans was named in the French squad for the 2011 Rugby World Cup. Heymans is the only person
Ayherre (1,339 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Zabalza Zaliotéguia Zokoa The commune name in basque is Aiherra. According to Jean-Baptiste Orpustan, the name comes from the basque ailherr ("incline")
Arbérats-Sillègue (1,300 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Oxarrainia Oxarrainia Etchartia Oyhanto Peritcho Salanbeheria Sillègue The name of the commune in basque is Arberatze-Zilhekoa. Paul Raymond indicated on
Dinard (1,034 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the 'Le Grand Hotel' on the seafront during the French "Belle Époque". The name Dinard comes from the words "Din" ("hill"/"fort") and Arz/Art ("fortified")
Wisconsin (10,828 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
assumed that he came ashore near Green Bay at Red Banks. Pierre Radisson and Médard des Groseilliers visited Green Bay again in 1654–1666 and Chequamegon Bay
Alçay-Alçabéhéty-Sunharette (1,228 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and Alçabéhéty. beheti means "at the bottom". The name Sunharette comes from the Basque zunharr (Name from Soule meaning "elm" or "poplar") using the romanized
Humanistic psychology (5,650 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and leaders of the movement include Roberto Assagioli, Gordon Allport, Medard Boss, Martin Buber (close to Jacob L. Moreno), James Bugental, Viktor Frankl
Argagnon (1,208 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sabaté Sarraillot Sauvajunte Tisné Its name in Béarnais is Arganhon. Brigitte Jobbé-Duval indicated that the name Argagnon originated from the first owner
Argelos, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (1,011 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The meaning of the name would then be "clay soil". The following table details the origins of the commune name and other names in the commune. Sources:
Marciac (427 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
international jazz festival, which runs for a fortnight every summer. The name of this Bastide was received by the King’s of France representative, seneschal
Aussevielle (846 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vignaux The commune name in béarnais is Aussavièla. Michel Grosclaude indicated that the name probably comes from the name of the Ousse which rises
Fulgence Ouedraogo (430 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Arthez-d'Asson (995 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tisnès Tort Turounet The commune name in béarnais is Artés d'Asson. Michel Grosclaude indicated that the name Arthez possibly came from the mediterranean
Crozant (825 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and the forestation of those former natural open spaces. The name of Crozant is probably derived from Celtic then the Latin "Croso" (which
Roquelaure (512 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
that was discovered more recently in 1898 and excavated in the 1960s. The name Roquelaure means "laurel hill" in Gascon. A medieval fortified town was built
Phalsbourg (521 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
since been razed. The town was German again from 1871 to 1918, under its old name of Pfalzburg. The United States Air Forces in Europe built an air base near
Bell tower (1,927 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Feock Church, Cornwall (13th century) Inside the belfry of St Medard & St Gildard's, England (13th century) Beijing Bell Tower (1272
Asson (1,590 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Trencade (pass - 1273 metres) The commune name in béarnais is also Asson. Michel Grosclaude said that the name probably comes from the basque aitz/as ("rocky
Angaïs (1,276 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Roque Turounet The commune name in béarnais is Angais. Brigitte Jobbe-Duval indicated that a possible origin of the name is the patronym Gaiz. She also
Aignay-le-Duc (1,533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Celtic population. Its name may come from the Celtic: Ann-iacum meaning "The location of the water source" ann- is a well known root name for rivers [e.g. l'Ain
Abitain (1,380 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
La Tuilerie The commune's name in Béarnais is Avitenh. Michel Grosclaude proposed a Latin etymology of Avitus (name of a man called "Avit") plus the
Alloue (3,709 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Limousine area where the climate is more humid and slightly cooler. The name of the commune Alloue is said to come from the Gallic word alauda meaning
Arvert (5,546 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Royannaise agglomeration. It was inaugurated on 2 January 2006 under the name " Très Royannais" and was originally composed of hybrid minibuses (electric
Aubin, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (1,069 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tournemouly Turon The commune name in béarnais is Aubin. Michel Grosclaude proposed an etymology of the Latin man's name Albius with the suffix -inum (Albinum)
Auxey-Duresses (1,044 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
During the Gallo-Roman period the town grew and became known by the Latin name Alcius. After the barbarian invasions of the 5th century AD the commune reached
Artix, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (1,251 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Béarn, and on the Cassini Map of 1750. Its name in béarnais is Artics. Michel Grosclaude indicated that the name Artix possibly was formed from the mediterranean
Ahaxe-Alciette-Bascassan (2,233 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ospitaletchia Sagardoyguibel Seineguy Uhaïtzia Urrutia The commune's name in Basque is Ahatsa-Altzieta Bazkazane. Ahaxe The toponym Ahaxe appears in
Ainharp (958 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Oyhemburia Oyhenart Palasiona Pekeix Sallaberria Urruty Uthuriet The commune name in Basque is Ainharbe. Jean-Baptiste Orpustan proposed two etymological
Agnos (1,177 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sayette Sentin The commune name in béarnais is Anhos. Michel Grosclaude suggested that Agnos came from a Latin man's name Annius with an Aqitaine suffix
Arhansus (806 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Portasanse Solaquia Uligainia The commune's name in basque is Arhantsusi (or Arhantsuse). The name is based on the basque radical Arhan-, Arran- from
Trois-Rivières (3,958 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
unknown to fur traders, he was the first white man to explore this region Médard Des Groseilliers and Pierre-Esprit Radisson, explorers, fur traders, founders
Aydius (1,079 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
de) Tousset l’Usclat (forest) The commune name in Gascon is Aidius. Michel Grosclaude said that the name probably comes from the same root as Aydie but
Arbouet-Sussaute (1,201 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Putchetenia Salanbeheria Sallaberry Saspithurry Sussaute Urchamendy The commune name in basque is Arboti-Zohota. According to Jean-Baptiste Orpustan Arboti is
Audaux (1,178 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vignes The commune name in béarnais is Audaus. Michel Grosclaude proposed a possible etymology from an Aquitaine man's name Aldene with the suffix
Arraute-Charritte (1,144 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
certainty of the origin of the name Arraute. The following table details the origins of the commune name and other names in the commune. Sources: Raymond:
Arancou (943 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bergouey-Viellenave to the Southwest The Gascon name for "Arancou" is Arancon; the Basque name is Erango. The name Arancou appears in the forms Arranque (1119–1136)
Barinque (1,304 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the commune. The commune name in béarnais is Barinco (pronounced Barincou). Michel Grosclaude concluded that the name is of Occitan origin with the
Vincent de Paul (2,064 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Perfection". In 1612 he was sent as parish priest to the Church of Saint-Medard in Clichy. In less than a year Bérulle recalled him to Paris to serve as
Ascarat (1,028 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ithurricheta Jauberria Pontoussénéa Puchulua La Solitude Tofinaenea Uhaldéa The name Ascarat appears in the forms: Ascarat (1106), Escarat (13th century), Azcarat
Sunda clouded leopard (2,143 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
[citation needed] The species was named Felis diardi in honor of the French naturalist and explorer Pierre-Médard Diard by Georges Cuvier in 1823, based
David Skrela (321 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Igneous rock (3,841 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-1-4051-6148-0.  T. L. Grove, N. Chatterjee, S. W. Parman, and E. Medard, (2006)The influence of H2O on mantle wedge melting. Earth and Planetary
Ahetze (1,873 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ostaleriaborda Solorzano Uhartea Xaharrenea Ximikoenea Xirrikenea The commune name in Basque is also Ahetze. Jean-Baptiste Orpustan suggested that Ahetze comes
Swithun (2,063 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
comes from a pagan or possibly prehistoric day of augury. In France, St. Medard (8 June), Urban of Langres, and St. Gervase and St. Protais (19 June) are
Auga (1,115 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maupas Méhil Miraut Moun Pargade Parrot Pellarouy Péruillet The commune name in béarnais is Augar. Michel Grosclaude suggested the etymology is Gascon
Abidos, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (1,113 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Gave de Pau. Bastia Bernacheyre Chalosse Joanlong Pleasure Us The name Abidos appears in the forms: Avitos in the 11th century, Pierre de Marca
Aïcirits-Camou-Suhast (1,577 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Berhouet Blazy Bordaberry Camou Capou Changartia Chourry Christy (2 place names) Coutrenia Elgartemix Enauthardy Errecaldia Escutary Esquilamborda Etchart
Ainhoa, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (2,857 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Xara Handia Xarak The commune name in basque is the same - Ainhoa. Brigitte Jobbé-Duval suggested that the name could come from the Basque aino which
Saint-Malo (1,560 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
are called Malouins in French. From this came the name of the Malvinas – the Falkland Islands named Îles Malouines by French explorer Louis-Antoine de
Barzun, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (959 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
that the name probably comes from the Latin anthroponym Barisius with the suffix -unum. The following table details the origins of the commune name and other
Athos-Aspis (1,254 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Natou Peyrou Poun Agnès Pys Rioutèque Sarrecaute L'Usine The commune name in béarnais is Atos-Aspins. For Athos Michel Grosclaude proposed the patronym
Barzan, Charente-Maritime (3,855 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bois") and for the production of Charentais Wine (called Talmonais). The name Barzan comed from the Latin Barisiacum from the Gallo-Roman anthroponym Barisii
Arrosès (1,348 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mothe Paris Peyret Raguet Regard Ribès Sassié Tapounet Tillet The commune name in béarnais is Arrosés. Michel Grosclaude proposed as its etymology the anthroponym
Censier – Daubenton (Paris Métro) (230 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
market along the Bièvre River, which is now covered in the area. Saint-Médard church Muséum national d'histoire naturelle (natural history museum) Institut
Saint-Maixent-l'École (823 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Oratorian monk Agapit, who was joined in 480 by Adjutor who took the name Maixent. Initially, the city was known as Saint-Saturnin. During the 6th
Aroue-Ithorots-Olhaïby (1,423 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Oyhençabal Pagueguy Poulit Quillilauquy Salla Sallagaray Saubidet The commune name in basque is Arüe-Ithorrotze-Olhaibi. Jean-Baptiste Orpustan indicated that
Astis (1,074 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nabarrot Pascal Plantié Sarrette Sarthoulet Sébat Tauhuré The commune name in béarnais is also Astis. Michel Grosclaude proposed a Gascon etymology
Bassussarry (1,182 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
longitude) in the top right hand corner of this article. The commune name in Basque is Basusarri. Jean-Baptiste Orpustan proposed a structure of baso
Beauharnois—Salaberry (620 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Beauharnois—Salaberry. See Beauharnois for information on the riding prior to 1952. The name of the riding was changed back to Beauharnois from 1966 to 1971, and from
Agey (1,392 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
entroques" According to Courtépée the name comes from Ageya or Agia with the final form of the name being adopted in 1574. The village is located
Waskaganish (1,324 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
September 1668, Nonsuch, under the command of Zachariah Gillam and guided by Médard des Groseilliers, anchored at the mouth of the Rupert River. In 1668, Rupert
Arbus, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (1,043 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Serviau Sibé Sibers Tourangé Les Tourne-Brides Tuheil Vigneau The commune name in béarnais is Arbús (according to the classical norm of Occitan). According
Baleix (949 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
etymologically the name comes from the Gascon Balèch meaning "plateau". The following table details the origins of the commune name and other names in the commune
Autricourt (1,409 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Champigny Gallic tombs have been found. The name Autricourt came from the Frankish era and was the name of a landowner: Auster with curtis meaning "domain"
Boss (surname) (72 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
American astronomer Marcellus Boss (1901–1967), 5th Civilian Governor of Guam Medard Boss (1903–1990), Swiss psychoanalytic psychiatrist Terry Boss (born 1981)
Slovakia (13,022 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
thunderstorms may occur because of the summer monsoon called Medardova kvapka (Medard drop – 40 days of rain). Summer in Northern Slovakia is usually mild with
Athée, Côte-d'Or (1,475 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
is on the Bresse Graben in the Saône Plain. The soil is sandy clay. The name Athée comes from the Latin Attegiae, meaning "huts" or "Shepherd's cabins"
Liederschiedt (1,371 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was first mentioned on a map of Sturzelbronn in 1313 under the name Ludenschiedt. The name was derived from two shepherds Leudo and Scheide. The town has
Arcangues (2,778 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sainte-Barbe Salazaharia Salha Teileria Xurrumilatx The basque name of the commune is Arrangoitze. Jean-Baptiste Orpustan proposed a joining
Guînes (542 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
whose churches were dedicated to Saint Bertin, Saint Pierre and Saint Médard. Outside the town ramparts were the abbey of Saint Léonard, the church of
Déols (1,112 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gildas from 920 to 1008 and founded another abbey under his vocable. The name of the new town comes from Château Raoul, the castle overlooking the river
France national rugby union team (3,048 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
XV at test level up until 26 November 2016. On 26 October, Guy Novès named a 32 man squad ahead of their 2016 end-of-year tests against Samoa, Australia
Francis Campaner (78 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1968 Lubersac 1969 Castillones Mont-de-Marsan Sizun GP Petit Varois Saint-Médard de Guizières 1972 La Bastide d'Armagnac 1974 Saussignac Tour de France:
Arette (2,285 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Zélukobortha (chasm) The commune name in béarnais is Arèta (according to the classical norm of Occitan). The name comes from the Basque ar- meaning "stone"
Boulevard du Temple (1,576 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
demolished sometime thereafter. 1769: Théâtre de l'Ambigu-Comique of Nicolas-Médard Audinot located at 62 boulevard du Temple destroyed by fire in 1827 (relocated
Beaune (1,020 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
name "Beaune" derives from the Latinised Gaulish word "Belena", which was the name of a spring around which the settlement was established. That name
Bitche (908 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of the villages of Rohr and Kaltenhausen in the 17th century, derives its name from the old stronghold (mentioned in 1172 as Bytis Castrum) standing on
Sames, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (1,273 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
sparse strip of farms along the banks of the Gaves and Adour, derives its name from small river islets that stood there in the 16th century and have since
Amorots-Succos (1,297 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
for Succos. The following table details the origins of the commune name and other names in the commune. Sources: Orpustan: Jean-Baptiste Orpustan, New Basque
Hudson's Bay Company (10,338 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
New France. Two French traders, Pierre-Esprit Radisson and Médard des Groseilliers (Médard de Chouart, Sieur des Groseilliers), Radisson's brother-in-law
Jean-Gabriel Prêtre (4,210 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(Prêtre, Turpin). 2. Paris: Imprimerie Royal.  in Bernard Germain Étienne Médard de La Ville-sur-Illon, comte de La Cépède (1818). Oeuvres complètes de Buffon
Nouvelle-Aquitaine (7,520 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
production of Ariane launchers and missiles Deterrent Force) is located in Saint-Médard-en-Jalles. Turbomeca (world leader in helicopter turbines) is located near
Artiguelouve (1,054 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
("height"). The following table details the origins of the commune name and other names in the commune. Sources: Raymond: Topographic Dictionary of the Department
AS Dragons FC de l'Ouémé (215 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
No. Position Player 1 GK Salomon Vinou 2 DF Medard Kodonou 3 DF Chemissy Dine Moustapha 4 DF Djalilou Orou 5 MF Kennedy do Rego 6 DF Nassim Daouda
Royan (2,772 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the 13th century were codified by the Lords of Royan in 1232, under the name of Coutume (Custom) of Royan. On May 20, 1242, Henry III, king of England
Abos, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (1,271 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Idernes Le Moulin d'en Bas Le Moulin d'en Haut Peyré Saint-Laurent The name Abos is mentioned in 1116 and 1234 (Pierre de Marca) and in the 13th century
2015 European Fencing Championships (65 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Boiko Andriy Yagodka Dmytro Pundyk Oleksiy Statsenko  Ukraine 7. Julien Médard Boladé Apithy Nicolas Rousset Vincent Anstett  France 8. Valery Pryiemka
Baigneux-les-Juifs (1,112 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
called Bagnos, probably from the Latin Balneolum meaning "small bath". This name was completed after a Jewish community was allowed to settle there in the
Aubusson, Creuse (968 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
936 and under the name Albuconis in 1070. The name possibly originates from a name of a man, Albucius Other scholars claim the name is from a Celtic word
Mattawa River (1,106 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Brébeuf in 1626, Gabriel Lallemant in 1648, Pierre-Esprit Radisson and Médard des Groseilliers in 1658, La Verendrye in 1731, Alexander MacKenzie in 1794
Étaules, Charente-Maritime (4,364 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of the town: Orivol, northwest, on the banks of the channel of the same name, lies at the junction catches of the "prise" of Malletatier and La Sause;
2010–11 Top 14 season (2,892 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
cap, noting, "Last season [2008–09], it's rumoured that one big, overseas name was paid less than 40% of his total income as a salary." LNR also announced
Athie, Côte-d'Or (596 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
period (1792-1795), the commune, formerly called Athie-lès-Moutier, took the name Athie-sous-Réome. List of Successive Mayors (Not all data is known) In
La Güera (629 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alaquas.org (Spanish) Veinte años de hermanamiento almanseño con Saint Mèdard La Verdad, 16 May 2010 (Spanish) Gemellaggi e Patti di Amicizia Regione
Thierry Dusautoir (989 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thierry Dusautoir named player of the year by IRB". Daily Telegraph. 24 October 2011. Retrieved 24 October 2011.  "Dusautoir named rugby player of year"
Ben Foden (1,416 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chris Ashton was third with 74, half a metre behind Maxime Médard, of France. He was named in the elite player squad for the 2010–11 season. Later that
Ascain (3,024 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Zelaia Zelaiakoborda The commune name in basque is Azkaine. The name Ascain probably comes from haitz gain meaning "top of the
Gerlachovský štít (2,489 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dalmatia, and Bosnia. 1900. For instance: (eb), "Babie leto je slávnejšie ako Medard." Korzár, 21 September 2002. Jadwiga Orliczowa and Vladimír Peterka, "Dohľadnosť
Le Grau-du-Roi (1,015 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and a bend in the river Vidourle. The étangs are named as follows: l'étang du Ponant, l'étang du Médard, l'étang du Repausset Levant, and the lac de Salonique
Thionville (1,026 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
publication now in the public domain: Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton.  passim
Bagnot (805 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Parthenay (1,600 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Parthenay was created with a wave of the fairy Melusine's wand. However the name of Parthenay first appears in written records at the beginning of the 11th
Michipicoten River (382 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bay by way of the Missinaibi and Moose rivers. Pierre-Esprit Radisson and Médard des Groseilliers are believed to be the first non-natives to travel this
American Vacuum Society (210 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Science & Technology Technical Group (MSTG) MEMS and NEMS Technical Group Medard W. Welch Award John A. Thornton Memorial Award & Lecture Article I, Constitution
Dimitri Szarzewski (354 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Vitré, Ille-et-Vilaine (2,469 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
site of Vitré was occupied in Gallo-Roman times. The name Vitré comes from the Gallo-Roman name "Victor" or "Victrix", after the owner of a farm in the
550s (3,026 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
in Central Asia. King Chlothar I of the Franks founds the Abbey of St. Medard at Soissons (Northern France). The Jiming Temple in Nanjing is built; the
Bertha of Holland (1,157 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
how she used her regal power (vi regia) to expel Abbot Gerard of Saint-Médard and reinstate the former abbot, Pontius, who had been removed due to his
Existentialism (10,743 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
cohesive ideological school. These thinkers - who include Ludwig Binswanger, Medard Boss, Eugène Minkowski, V.E. Gebsattel, Roland Kuhn, G. Caruso, F.T. Buytendijk
June 8 (3,499 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(Droste zu Vischering) Chlodulf of Metz Jacques Berthieu Jadwiga of Poland Medard Melania the Elder Roland Allen (Episcopal Church (USA)) Thomas Ken (Church
Astrium (1,502 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The company has facilities in France (Les Mureaux near Paris and Saint-Médard-en-Jalles near Bordeaux) and in Germany; the main facility in Germany is
Forbach (601 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(born 1975), singer Jean-Nicolas Houchard (1740–1793), French General, whose name appears on the Arc de Triomphe in Paris Sophie Huber (born 1985), freestyle
Châteauroux (931 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
on the right bank of the Indre. The castle from which the city takes its name was built in the latter part of the 10th century by Raoul, prince of Déols
Gevrey-Chambertin (721 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Vigy (1,568 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
edge of a forest. Part of village belongs to an Important Bird Area The name of the village may come from a man of Gallo-Roman origin, Vigius. Originally
Hendaye (1,805 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
style, was built in 1885. It used to be occupied by a casino (hence the name), until it was moved to the quartier de Sokoburu. The picturesque old fishing
Viking Age (9,480 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a sentence from an antiphon for churches dedicated to St. Vaast or St. Medard: Summa pia gratia nostra conservando corpora et cutodita, de gente fera
2013 Six Nations Championship (2,486 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
OC 13 Florian Fritz 51' to 57'  67' IC 12 Wesley Fofana LW 11 Maxime Médard FH 10 Frédéric Michalak SH 9 Morgan Parra N8 8 Louis Picamoles OF 7 Thierry
Nuits-Saint-Georges (575 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Ampilly-les-Bordes (1,125 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Arnay-le-Duc (2,623 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
revolutionary period of the National Convention (1792-1795), the town took the name of Arnay-sur-Arroux. It was the capital of the district of Arnay-sur-Arroux
Bordeaux Métropole (280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Parempuyre Pessac Saint-Aubin-de-Médoc Saint-Louis-de-Montferrand Saint-Médard-en-Jalles Saint-Vincent-de-Paul Le Taillan-Médoc Talence Villenave-d'Ornon
International Criminal Court judges election, 2003 (455 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hajnalka Kárpáti  Hungary List A Eastern European States Female Joseph-Médard Katuala Kaba Kashala  Democratic Republic of the Congo List A African States
Agencourt (643 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Orthez (869 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "article name needed". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. 
Oloron-Sainte-Marie (864 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Viscount of Béarn built the new city of "Oloron" (medieval version of the Roman name Iluro) on the opposite side of the river from the diocese center. Centulle
Biarritz (3,884 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Basque Country. In Basque, its name is Biarritz or Miarritze. Its current Occitan Gascon name is Biàrrits. The name for an inhabitant is Biarrot; Biarriztar
Barjon (735 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
International Criminal Court judges election, 2003 (455 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hajnalka Kárpáti  Hungary List A Eastern European States Female Joseph-Médard Katuala Kaba Kashala  Democratic Republic of the Congo List A African States
Balot, Côte-d'Or (1,065 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Aisey-sur-Seine (1,190 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Baubigny, Côte-d'Or (1,001 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Ahuy (1,295 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Arcenant (758 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Bard-lès-Époisses (660 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Ampilly-le-Sec (939 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Argilly (819 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Bard-le-Régulier (794 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Biarritz (3,884 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Basque Country. In Basque, its name is Biarritz or Miarritze. Its current Occitan Gascon name is Biàrrits. The name for an inhabitant is Biarrot; Biarriztar
Rive-de-Gier (2,092 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the town lay on the boundary between the Segusiavi and the Allobroges. The name of Rive-de-Gier is used for the first time in the 11th century. Renaud de
Barbirey-sur-Ouche (951 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Baulme-la-Roche (668 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Damien Traille (472 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pierre Poux Servat Szarzewski Backs Clerc Estebanez Heymans Marty Médard Mermoz Palisson Parra Rougerie Skrela (injured) Traille Trinh-Duc Yachvili
Arcey, Côte-d'Or (627 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Saint-Chamond, Loire (1,424 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
town had about 35,000 inhabitants. The people are called "Couramiauds", a name that comes from a tradition during the summer festival of the feu de la Saint-Jean
Montbronn (1,032 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Julien-lès-Metz Saint-Jure Saint-Louis Saint-Louis-lès-Bitche Saint-Médard Saint-Privat-la-Montagne Saint-Quirin Salonnes Sanry-lès-Vigy Sanry-sur-Nied
Saint-Bertrand-de-Comminges (894 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the passage to the Aran Valley and the Iberian peninsula. The colony was named Lugdunum Convenarum and had reached around 30,000 people at its highest
2014 Six Nations Championship (1,789 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
made their international debuts for England. Notes: Paul O'Connell was named at lock for this match, but was ruled out with a chest infection hours before
Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Lyon (4,387 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Archbishop of Lyon in 814 after Leidrade's retirement to the Abbey of St. Medard, Soissons, composed a long treatise against that heresy. Agobard displayed
Louis XV of France (10,223 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
religious opposition. The troubles caused by the convulsionaries of the Saint-Médard graveyard in Paris (a group of Jansenists claiming that miracles took place
Arconcey (664 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Avosnes (663 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Ancey (1,094 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Antigny-la-Ville (663 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Auvillars-sur-Saône (1,006 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Aiserey (589 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(1828-1897), a famous French physician born in Aiserey, which also has a street named in his honour Claude Bossuet d'Aiserey the uncle of Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
Aubigny-la-Ronce (1,294 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Aubigny-lès-Sombernon (833 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Asnières-lès-Dijon (848 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Arnay-sous-Vitteaux (665 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magny-la-Ville Magny-lès-Aubigny Magny-lès-Villers Magny-Montarlot Magny-Saint-Médard Magny-sur-Tille Les Maillys Maisey-le-Duc Mâlain Maligny Manlay Marandeuil
Pau, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (18,169 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was an exceptional year which had several Pau competitors, led by Julien Médard, Gavin Lallement and Romain Miramon, winning national and international
Bagnères-de-Luchon (3,958 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
with hail due to the moist air in the south and dry air in the north. The name Bagneres-de-Luchon comes in part from its hydrotherapy (bagnères = baths)
Plant City, Florida (1,669 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Service Station Dinosaur World Metals & Nature Alderman's Ford Park Edward Medard Park and Reservoir, a 1,284 acre preserve with 3.25 mile bridle path, fishing
Rennes (5,410 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
back more than 2,000 years, at a time when it was a small Gallic village named Condate. Together with Vannes and Nantes, it was one of the major cities
Fougères (7,026 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Breton name is Felger. Entry signs to the agglomeration have carried this name for several years. One of the two bagad of the city takes this name: Bagad
Nay, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (807 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint-Laurent-Bretagne Saint-Martin-d'Arberoue Saint-Martin-d'Arrossa Saint-Médard Saint-Michel Saint-Palais Saint-Pé-de-Léren Saint-Pée-sur-Nivelle Saint-Pierre-d'Irube
Angoulême (11,381 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Revolution the city was known by the transient name of Montagne-Charente. The district of Bussatte takes its name from the Low Latin buxetta / buxettum which
Dijon (2,589 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dijon date to the Neolithic period. Dijon later became a Roman settlement named Divio, located on the road from Lyon to Paris. The province was home to
La Rochelle (3,979 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
occupied in antiquity by the Gallic tribe of the Santones, who gave their name to the nearby region of Saintonge and the city of Saintes.[citation needed]
Philippe, Duke of Anjou (411 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
superstitious beliefs, the women mixed in earth from the grave of Saint Medard with his food; the child was given so much earth that his organs failed
Saint-Jean-Port-Joli, Quebec (479 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
wood carving began in the early 20th century with the Bourgault brothers, Médard, Jean-Julien and André. Despite its small population, the village is a
Bardos, Pyrénées-Atlantiques (3,517 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
housing was 1.3%. The commune name in Basque is Bardoze and its name in Occitan, gascon dialect is Bardòs. The name consists of the root bard- or bart-
Name days in France (9 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a calendar of name days in France.
Merzweiler (2,647 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
parish is unknown. In the Late Middle Ages, the church was a branch of Medard. Since the village then belonged to the Duchy of Palatinate-Zweibrücken
Hugh Capet (4,775 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vermandois, while Count of Chateau-Thierry, Vitry and lay abbot of Saint-Médard of Soissons, bearing the title of "Count of the Franks" and even "count
Château Cantemerle (1,528 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the squire Jean de Caupène was described as Lord of Cantemerle. His son, Médard de Caupène, later became Lord until the end of the fifteenth century. In
Stade Toulousain (1,630 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
France Yoann Huget Wing France Semi Kunatani Wing Fiji Sofiane Guitoune Fullback France Maxime Médard Fullback France Alexis Palisson Fullback France
1916 in literature (1,852 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
to Faremido (Utazás Faremidóba) Grace King – The Pleasant Ways of St. Medard Ring Lardner – You Know Me Al Benito Lynch – The Caranchos of Florida I