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searching for Margot Finn 8 found (15 total)

alternate case: margot Finn

Welsh Wig (400 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

Material Culture – Margot Finn, John McAleer, Pat Hudson". History AFTER Hobsbawm. "Economic History and Material Culture – Margot Finn, John McAleer, Pat
1875 in Wales (780 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 27 January 2009. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) Margot Finn; Kate Smith (15 February 2018). East India Company at Home, 1757-1857
Sir Henry Russell, 2nd Baronet (681 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
can be found in "The East India Company at Home 1757 - 1857" edited by Margot Finn and Kate Smith, published by UCL Press 2018 ISBN 978-1-78735-029-8 Sir
Raymond baronets (406 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(2018). "Valentines, the Raymonds and Company material culture". In Margot Finn and Kate Smith (ed.). East India Company at Home, 1757-1857. UCL Press
Lloyd Jones (socialist) (1,097 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Incredible and Absurd. Dundee: James Chalmers & Alexander Reid. 1839. Margot Finn After Chartism: Class and Nation in English Radical Politics 1848–1874
Edwin Coulson (605 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Iorwerth Prothero, Radical Artisans in England and France, 1830-1870, p.98 Margot Finn, After Chartism: Class and Nation in English Radical Politics 1848-1874
Raymond (1782 EIC ship) (1,256 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
(2018). "Valentines, the Raymonds and Company material culture". In Margot Finn and Kate Smith (ed.). East India Company at Home, 1757-1857. UCL Press
Marshalsea (10,428 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
a business partner to enter the jail when it suited them. Historian Margot Finn writes that discharge was therefore used as a punishment; one debtor