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Longer titles found: List of extinct languages of South America (view), Indigenous languages of South America (view), List of unclassified languages of South America (view), List of indigenous languages of South America (view)

searching for Languages of South America 218 found (392 total)

alternate case: languages of South America

Xeta language (45 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Xeta is an extinct Tupí–Guaraní language of Brazil. Xeta language at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015) Xeta at Ethnologue (16th ed., 2009) Hammarström, Harald;
Catacaoan languages (203 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Catacaoan languages are an extinct family of three languages spoken in the Piura Region of Peru. The three languages in the family are: Catacao or
Ewarhuyana language (58 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Krenak language (99 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Krenak language, or Botocudo, is the sole surviving language of a small family believed to be part of the Macro-Gê languages. It was once spoken by
Duit language (212 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Duit is an extinct Chibcha language, spoken by the Muisca of present-day Boyacá, Colombia. The language appears in the modern name of the pre-Columbian
Macarrônico (623 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Português macarrônico (Portuguese pronunciation: [puʁtuˈgez mɐkɐˈʁõniku], "macaronic Portuguese", pronounced [portʊˈgeːz(e) makaˈrɔːniko] by its speakers)
Pasto language (255 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Warázu language (196 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Warázu, also known as Pauserna or Guarasugwé (Guarasú'we), is a moribund Tupi–Guaraní language of Bolivia. It is spoken by the Guarasugwé people who number
Barawana language (188 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Barawana (Baré) is an Arawakan language of Venezuela and Brazil, where it is nearly extinct. It was spoken by the Baré people. Aikhenvald (1999) reports
Chané language (65 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chané is an extinct language of Argentina and Bolivia. It was either a dialect of, or closely related to, the Terena language of the Arawakan language
Cubeo language (595 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Cubeo language (also spelled Cuveo) is the language spoken by the Cubeo people in the Vaupés Department, the Cuduyari and Querarí Rivers and their
Saraveca language (109 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saraveca is an extinct Arawakan language once spoken in Bolivia by the Sarave. It is said to be the only language with a numeral system based exclusively
Panche people (690 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Panche or Tolima were an indigenous group of people in what is now Colombia. Their language is unclassified – and possibly unclassifiable – but may
Umotína language (109 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Umotína or Umutína is a recently extinct language of Brazil. It is one of the few languages in the world to have a linguolabial consonant; in unpublished
Yabaâna language (33 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yabaâna (Yabaána, Yabahana) is an extinct Arawakan language of Brazil. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Yabaâna"
Amanayé language (68 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Amanayé (Amanaje) is a possibly extinct Tupi language last spoken in the town of São Domingos on the Capim River in Pará State, Brazil. The closely related
Gueren language (71 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Guerén (Guêren) is an extinct Botocudoan language of Brazil, related to Krenak. Today, several thousand Guerén people live in Olivença, Alagoas, but they
Cacán language (618 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center. Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Malalí language (96 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Malalí is an extinct native language of Brazil. It is unclassified, though it may be related to Maxakalian. Malali was historically spoken in an area between
Manao language (61 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Manao is a long-extinct Arawakan language of Brazil. The Manaos gave their name to the present-day city of Manaus, the capital city of the state of Amazonas
Arikem language (40 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arikem is an extinct Tupian language of the state of Rondônia, in the Amazon region of Brazil. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin
Urumi language (46 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Urumi is an extinct Tupian language of the state of Rondônia, in the Amazon region of Brazil. Urumi at Ethnologue (15th ed., 2005) Hammarström, Harald;
Shiriana language (116 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Amazonian Languages, 1999. Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Maritsauá language (48 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maritsauá (Manitsawá) is an extinct Tupian language of the state of Mato Grosso, in the Amazon region of Brazil. Maritsauá at Ethnologue (11th ed., 1988)
Xipaya language (82 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pará region of Brazil. It is one of the approximately 70 Tupian languages of South America. At last count, Xipaya was only spoken by two elderly women in
Puelche language (301 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Kepkiriwát language (46 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kepkiriwát is an extinct Tupian language of the state of Rondônia, in the Amazon region of Brazil. Kepkiriwát at Ethnologue (15th ed., 2005) Hammarström
Yauna language (45 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yauna (Yahuna) is an extinct Tucanoan language of Colombia. Yauna language at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015) Yauna at Ethnologue (12th ed., 1992). Hammarström
Manao language (61 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Manao is a long-extinct Arawakan language of Brazil. The Manaos gave their name to the present-day city of Manaus, the capital city of the state of Amazonas
Panoan languages (2,608 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Press. ISBN 0-292-70414-3. Kaufman, Terrence. (1994). "The native languages of South America." In C. Mosley & R. E. Asher (Eds.), Atlas of the world's languages
Gueren language (71 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Guerén (Guêren) is an extinct Botocudoan language of Brazil, related to Krenak. Today, several thousand Guerén people live in Olivença, Alagoas, but they
Tehuelche language (496 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Spanish). Retrieved 2020-03-18. Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Carib language (990 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Carib or Kari'nja is a Cariban language spoken by the Kalina people (Caribs) of South America. It is spoken by around 7,400 people mostly in Venezuela
Puelche language (301 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Cocoliche (678 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cocoliche is an Italian–Spanish mixed language or pidgin that was spoken by Italian immigrants in Argentina (especially in Greater Buenos Aires) and Uruguay
Dzubukua language (167 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dzubukuá (Dzubucua), or Kiriri, is an extinct Karirian language of Brazil. It is sometimes considered a dialect of a single Kariri language. A short grammatical
Kawishana language (92 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cawishana (Kawishana, Kaishana) is an Arawakan language, presumably extinct, of Brazil. A few speakers were reported in the 1950s. Aikhenvald (1999) classifies
Uru-Pa-In language (83 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Uru-Pa-In is an isolated Tupi–Guaraní language of the state of Rondônia, in the Amazon region of Brazil. Speakers have no permanent contact with the outside
Maxakalí language (1,445 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maxakalí (Tikmũũn yĩy ax, Mãxakani yĩy ax) is a Maxakalían language spoken in four villages in Minas Gerais, Brazil, by more than 2000 people. No dialectal
Muellama language (32 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Muellama (Muellamués) is an extinct Barbacoan language of Colombia. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Muellamues"
Tacanan languages (647 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Press. ISBN 0-292-70414-3. Kaufman, Terrence. (1994). The native languages of South America. In C. Mosley & R. E. Asher (Eds.), Atlas of the world's languages
Mapoyo-Yabarana language (108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mapoyo, or Mapoyo–Yavarana, is a Carib language spoken along the Suapure and Parguaza Rivers, Venezuela. The ethnic population of Mapoyo proper is about
Apiaká language (498 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Apiaká is a recently extinct Tupi language of the Apiacá people of the upper Rio Tapajos area of Mato Grosso, Brazil. It has been supplanted by Portuguese
Língua Geral of São Paulo (99 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Língua Geral Paulista (São Paulo General language), or Tupí Austral (Southern Tupi), was a Tupi-based trade language of São Vicente, São Paulo, and
Siona language (353 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Siona language (otherwise known as Sioni, Pioje, Pioche-Sioni, Ganteyabain, Ganteya, Ceona, Zeona, Koka, Kanú) is a Tucanoan language of Colombia and
Xakriabá language (246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Xakriabá (also written Chakriaba, Chikriaba, Shacriaba) is an extinct or dormant Akuwẽ (Central Jê) language (Jê, Macro-Jê) formerly spoken in Minas Gerais
Acroá language (131 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Acroá (Acroá-mirim) is an extinct Akuwẽ (Central Jê) language (Jê, Macro-Jê) of Brazil. It was spoken by the Acroá people around the headwaters of the
Otuke language (233 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center. Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Kipea language (223 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kipeá (Quipea), or Kariri, is an extinct Karirian language of Brazil. It is sometimes considered a dialect of a single Kariri language. A short grammatical
Tuxinawa language (52 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tuxináwa (Tuchinawa) is an extinct Panoan language of Brazil. It closely resembled Yaminawa dialects. Tuxináwa at Ethnologue (10th ed., 1984). Note: Data
Abipón language (209 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Abipón language was a native American language of the Guaicuruan group of the Guaycurú-Charruan family that was at one time spoken in Argentina by
Kamurú language (43 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kamurú (Camuru) is an extinct Karirian language of Brazil. It is sometimes considered a dialect of a single Kariri language. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel
Ingain language (181 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center. Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Menien language (42 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Menién is an extinct language related to Kamakã, believed to be part of the Macro-Jê languages of Brazil. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath
Wariapano language (60 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wariapano (Huariapano), also known as Pano, Panavarro, and Pánobo, is an obsolescent Panoan language of Peru. There are three attested dialects: Shetebo
Sabujá language (113 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sabujá (Sapoya), or Pedra Branca, is an extinct Karirian language of northeastern Bahia, Brazil. It is sometimes considered a dialect of a single Kariri
Chibcha language (1,940 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chibcha is an extinct language of Colombia, spoken by the Muisca, one of the many advanced indigenous civilizations of the Americas. The Muisca inhabited
Kamakan language (209 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Kamakã language (Kamakan), or Ezeshio, is an extinct language of a small family believed to be part of the Macro-Jê languages of Brazil. Dialects included
Sensi language (62 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sensi (Senti, Tenti, Mananahua) is an extinct Panoan language, spoken on the right bank of the Ucayali River, Peru. Sensi at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
Pemon language (452 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Pemon language (or Pemón in Spanish), is an indigenous language of the Cariban family spoken by some 30,000 Pemon people, in Venezuela's Southeast
Tupinambá people (549 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tupinambá are one of the various Tupi ethnic groups that inhabit present-day Brazil since before the conquest of the region by Portuguese colonial
Pataxó language (283 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pataxó (Patashó), or Pataxó Hã-Ha-Hãe (Pataxó-Hãhaãi), is an extinct native language in Brazil formerly spoken by the Pataxó people of the Bahia region
Jirajara language (77 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jirajara is an extinct language of western Venezuela. Other than being part of the Jirajaran family, its classification is uncertain due to a lack of data
Guarani language (3,602 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Guaraní (/ˌɡwɑːrəˈniː, ˈɡwɑːrəni/) specifically the primary variety known as Paraguayan Guarani (avañeʼẽ [aʋ̃ãɲẽˈʔẽ] "the people's language"), is a South
Miriti language (31 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Miriti is an extinct Tucanoan language of Brazil. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Miriti". Glottolog 3.0. Jena,
Môa Remo language (73 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Remo (Rheno) is an extinct indigenous language once spoken along the Môa River of Amazonas, Peru, one of several Panoan languages to go by that name. It
Gayon language (119 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gayón is an extinct language of western Venezuela, spoken at the sources of the Tocuyo River in the state of Lara. Other than being part of the Jirajaran
Jirajara language (77 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jirajara is an extinct language of western Venezuela. Other than being part of the Jirajaran family, its classification is uncertain due to a lack of data
Pijao language (315 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Science of Human History. Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Ayoman language (106 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ayomán is an extinct language of western Venezuela, once spoken in the village of Siquisique in the state of Lara. Other than being part of the Jirajaran
Güenoa language (41 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Güenoa is an extinct Charruan language once spoken in Uruguay and Argentina. Güenoa people Charruan languages Charrúa people Hammarström, Harald; Forkel
Amazon Mayoruna language (63 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Amazon Mayoruna is an extinct indigenous once spoken along the Amazon River, on the borders of Brazil, Peru, and Colombia. There were two dialects, known
Balomar language (30 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Balomar is an undescribed, extinct language, formerly spoken in the Province of Entre Ríos, Argentina. Loukotka, Čestmír (1968). Classification of South
Atsawaka language (148 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Atswawaka, also called Atsahuaca, or Atsawaka-Yamiaka, is an extinct Panoan language of Peru. Atsahuaca is the name that the tribe calls themselves, meaning
Caranqui language (109 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Caranqui, or Cara (Kara), is an extinct, probably Barbacoan language of Ecuador. Caranqui was replaced by Quechua, perhaps surviving as late as the 18th
Charrúa language (38 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charrúa is an extinct Charruan language historically spoken by the Charrúa people in southern Uruguay. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath
Teushen language (156 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Teushen language is an indigenous language of Argentina, which may be extinct. It was spoken by the Teushen people, a nomadic hunter-gatherer people
Jaquirana Remo language (46 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jaquirana Remo is an extinct indigenous language once spoken in the Brazilian Amazon Basin, near the border with Peru. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert;
Cumanagoto language (75 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cumanagoto (Cumanogota, Cumaná, Kumaná); also Chaima (Chayma) is an endangered Cariban language of eastern coastal Venezuela. It was the language of the
Ona language (369 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ona (Aona), also known as Selk'nam (Shelknam), is a language that is spoken by the Selk'nam people in Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego in southernmost South
Tama language (Colombia) (51 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Tama is an extinct indigenous Tucanoan language of Colombia. It was spoken in the regions of Vicente, Orteguaza River and Caquetá Region. Hammarström,
Malibu languages (367 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Malibu languages are a poorly attested group of extinct languages once spoken along the Magdalena River in Colombia. Material exists only for two of
Demushbo language (47 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Demushbo (Dëmushbo), or ambiguously Remo, is an extinct Panoan language of the Brazilian Amazon basin, near the Peruvian border. Endangered Languages Project
Záparo language (471 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Záparo is a nearly extinct language spoken by the Sápara or Záparo people of Ecuador. As of 2000, it was spoken by only one person out of a total population
Jandiatuba Mayoruna language (43 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jandiatuba Mayoruna is an extinct indigenous language of the Brazilian Amazon basin, near the borders of Peru and Colombia. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel
Cueretú language (51 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cueretú (Curetu) is an extinct language of the Amazon basin. It may be Tucanoan, but more recently has been left unclassified due to sparsity of data.[citation
Blanco River Remo language (47 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Blanco River Remo is an extinct indigenous language once spoken in the Peruvian Amazon Basin, near the border with Brazil. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel
Anserma language (125 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Campbell, Lyle, and Verónica Grondona (eds). 2012. The indigenous languages of South America: a comprehensive guide. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. Jolkesky, Marcelo
Tabatinga Mayoruna language (58 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tabatinga Mayoruna is an extinct indigenous language of the Amazon basin, on the borders of Brazil, Peru, and Colombia. It is the most divergent of the
Bororo language (3,463 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
This process is summarized in the table below. Bororo, like most languages of South America, is synthetic and agglutinative (albeit with some degree of fusion)
Tarauacá Kashinawa language (46 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tarauacá Kashinawa (Cashinahua of the Tarauacá River) is an extinct indigenous once spoken in the western Brazilian Amazon Basin. Hammarström, Harald;
Língua Geral (203 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Língua Geral (Brazilian Portuguese: [ˈlĩɡwɐ ʒeˈɾaw], General Language) is the name of two distinct lingua francas, spoken in Brazil: the Língua Geral Paulista
Atanque language (41 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Atanque (Atanques) or Cancuamo (Kankuamo), also known as Kankwe and Kankuí, is an extinct Chibchan language of Colombia. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert;
Panzaleo language (211 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Panzaleo (Pansaleo, Quito, Latacunga) is a poorly attested and unclassified indigenous American language that was spoken in the region of Quito until the
Huaca (454 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
In the Quechuan languages of South America, a huaca or wak'a is an object that represents something revered, typically a monument of some kind. The term
Arma language (78 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arma is a possible but unattested extinct language of Colombia. Arma-Pozo language "Request Number 2019-017 for Change to ISO 639-3 Language Code" (PDF)
Yupuá language (33 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yupuá (Jupua), or Yupuá-Duriña, is an extinct Tucanoan language. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Yupua". Glottolog
Urupa language (80 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Urupa (Urupá, Ituarupá) was a Chapacuran language. Yaru (Yarú, Jarú) was a dialect or a closely related language. Maldi, Denise. O complexo cultural do
Andoa language (92 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Andoa is an extinct Zaparoan language of Peru. It was found in the Pastaza River region of Peru. It is also known as Shimigae/Semigae and Gae/Gay. The
Puruhá language (152 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Sinúfana language (17 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sinúfana (Cenufana; also Cenu/Zenu/Sinú) is an extinct, poorly attested, and possibly Chocoan language of Colombia.
Tupi language (4,335 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Old Tupi or classical Tupi is an extinct Tupian language which was spoken by the aboriginal Tupi people of Brazil, mostly those who inhabited coastal regions
Aushiri language (56 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aushiri (Auxira, Vacacocha) is an extinct Zaparoan language formerly spoken in Peru. It was spoken in the area of the tributaries to the right bank of
Tapajó people (214 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tapajós, also called the Santarém culture, were an indigenous Brazilian people, now extinct, who in the 17th century lived in the area around where
Apurinã language (2,344 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Apurinã, or Ipurina, is a Southern Maipurean language spoken by the Apurinã people of the Amazon basin. It has an active–stative syntax. Apurinã is a Portuguese
Yameo language (145 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center. Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Arawá language (58 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arawá AKA Aruá is an extinct language of Brazil. The people were wiped out by introduced measles, and the last speaker died in 1877. All that survives
Lencan languages (919 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(2012), "Classification of the Indigenous Languages of South America", The Indigenous Languages of South America, DE GRUYTER, doi:10.1515/9783110258035.59
Alexandra Aikhenvald (777 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexandra Yurievna "Sasha" Aikhenvald (Eichenwald) is a linguist specialising in linguistic typology and the Arawak language family (including Tariana)
Guajá language (95 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Skepi Creole Dutch (645 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Skepi is an extinct Dutch-based creole language of Guyana, spoken in the region of Essequibo. It was not mutually intelligible with Berbice Creole Dutch
Cahuarano language (60 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cahuarano is a recently extinct indigenous American language of the Zaparoan family, once spoken along the Nanay river in Peru. The last speaker died in
Yuri language (Amazon) (265 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Latin American Center. Kaufman, Terrence (1994). "The native languages of South America". In Moseley, Christopher and R.E. Asher (ed.). Atlas of the world's
Himarimã language (69 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Himarimã is the presumed language of the uncontacted Hi-Merimã people in Amazonas, Brazil, The language is believed to be Arawán per testimonies from the
Caquinte language (202 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Campbell; Verónica Grondona (27 January 2012). The Indigenous Languages of South America: A Comprehensive Guide. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 214–. ISBN 978-3-11-025803-5
Quimbaya language (78 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Berbice Creole Dutch (695 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Berbice Dutch Creole is a now extinct Dutch creole language. It had a lexicon partly based on a dialect of the West African language, perhaps the ancestor
Maynas language (154 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Carabayo language (514 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Carabayo (Caraballo) language is spoken by the Carabayo people, also known as Yuri and Aroje, an uncontacted Amazonian people of Colombia living in
Waitaká language (148 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Catuquinaru language (187 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Catuquinarú is the extinct and unclassified language of the Catuquinaru tribe of Brazil, preserved in a few words collected by Jose Bach and published
Yao language (Trinidad) (177 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Yao (Jaoi, Yaoi, Yaio, Anacaioury) is an extinct Cariban language of Trinidad and French Guiana, attested in a single 1640 word list recorded by Joannes
Harákmbut languages (250 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Lorenzo Hervás (986 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
María Catrileo (126 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
María Catrileo Chiguailaf de Codo is a native Mapuche linguist and professor of Spanish, English and Mapudungun language. In 2009, Catrileo received the
Cañari language (262 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cañar or Cañari is a poorly attested extinct language of the Marañón River basin in Ecuador which is difficult to classify, apart from being apparently
Quingnam language (325 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Quingnam language was a pre-Columbian language that was spoken by the Chimú people, who lived in the former territories of the Mochicas: an area north
Haush language (215 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Haush language (also Manek'enk) was an indigenous language spoken by the Haush people and was formerly spoken on the island of Tierra del Fuego. The
Kukurá language (185 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Campbell, Lyle; Grondona, Verónica (2012-01-27). The Indigenous Languages of South America: A Comprehensive Guide. Walter de Gruyter. p. 133. ISBN 978-3-11-025803-5
María Catrileo (126 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
María Catrileo Chiguailaf de Codo is a native Mapuche linguist and professor of Spanish, English and Mapudungun language. In 2009, Catrileo received the
Het peoples (351 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Het were the people of the northern Patagonian pampas west of the Paraná River: The Chechehet, the Diuihet AKA Didiuhet, and the Taluhet. The easternmost
Tallán language (226 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dissertation, University of Brasília. Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Guaicaro language (175 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Guaicaro (Guaïcaro) is an extinct, unclassified language of Patagonia known only from a 19-word list and personal names. The Guaicaro people apparently
Filippo Salvatore Gilii (509 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Filippo Salvatore Gilii (Spanish: Felipe Salvator Gilij) (1721–1789) was an Italian Jesuit priest who lived in the Province of Venezuela (in present day
Flecheiros (228 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Flecheiros are one of the uncontacted peoples in the Javari region of the Amazon. Their ambiguous name simply means "arrow shooters". Ethnographically
Humahuaca language (196 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Jacinto Jijón y Caamaño (450 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jacinto Jijón y Caamaño(December 11, 1890 – August 17, 1950) was an Ecuadorian historian, archeologist, and politician. He was the mayor of the city of
Conambo language (55 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
language. Lyle Campbell and Verónica Grondona, The Indigenous Languages of South America: A Comprehensive Guide, Walter de Gruyter, 2012, ISBN 311025803X
Willem Adelaar (653 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Willem F. H. Adelaar (born at The Hague in 1948) is a Dutch linguist specializing in Native American languages, specially those of the Andes. He is Professor
Peba language (85 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Science of Human History. Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Palta language (229 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1998 edition, Quito: Abya-Yala). Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Koeruna language (32 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coeruna (Koeruna) is an extinct Witotoan language of Brazil. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Coeruna". Glottolog
Ramanos language (98 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ramanos is a poorly attested extinct language of what is now Bolivia. Glottolog concludes that "the minuscule wordlist ... shows no convincing resemblances
Antioquian languages (96 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Antioquian may refer to any of several extinct and poorly attested or unattested languages of the Santa Fe de Antioquia region of Colombia. The languages
Guanaca language (38 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Guambiano. Campbell, Lyle, and Verónica Grondona (eds). 2012. The indigenous languages of South America: a comprehensive guide. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.
Xokleng language (113 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Science of Human History. Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Majena language (226 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Majena, also known as Majiena or Maxiena, is an unclassified, now-extinct language, originally spoken by the alleged Ticomeri people of the Llanos de Mojos
Sanavirón language (100 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Koihoma language (61 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Koihoma (Coixoma), also known ambiguously as Coto (Koto) and Orejone (Orejón), neither its actual name, is an extinct Witotoan language of Peru. In Steven
Panare language (1,182 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
” In: Lyle Campbell, Verónica Grondona (eds.), The Indigenous Languages of South America: A Comprehensive Guide, 259-330: Berlin: Walter de Gruyter Crevels
Awetï language (749 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Campbell, Lyle; Grondona, Verónica (2012-01-27). The Indigenous Languages of South America: A Comprehensive Guide. Walter de Gruyter. ISBN 9783110258035
Irma Alvarez Ccoscco (253 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Irma Álvarez Ccoscco (born in Haquira,Peru)is a Quechua-language poet, educator and digital language activist. Alvaz Ccoscco language activism focuses
Antonio Tovar (1,374 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Antonio Tovar Llorente (17 May 1911 – 13 December 1985) was a Spanish philologist, linguist and historian. Born in Valladolid, the son of a notary, he
Mucuchí language (104 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Gorgotoqui language (447 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gorgotoqui is a currently undocumented extinct language of the Chiquitania region of the eastern Bolivian lowlands. During the period of the Jesuit missions
Maria das Dores de Oliveira (451 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maria das Dores de Oliveira (Maria Pankararu) is a Pankararú linguist. She is best known as the first indigenous scholar to have obtained a doctoral degree
Quechua Alliance (311 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Quechua Alliance is a community organization that promotes and celebrates Andean culture in the United States. Since 2015, the Quechua Alliance has
Rosa Palomino (385 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rosa Palomino Chahuareses is an Aymara Indigenous leader, journalist, and human rights activist in Peru. In 2014, the Ministry of Culture presented her
Araucanian languages (408 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dissertation, University of Brasília. Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Enxet language (463 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
vocabulary comparison in South American languages. The Native Languages of South America: Origins, Development, Typology, 56. Kidd, Stephen W. (1995).
Katukinan languages (671 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Elva Ambía (334 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elva Ambía is a Peruvian award-winning educator, Quechua language activist, writer, and founder of the Quechua Collective of New York. A Quechua native
Anselmo Raguileo Lincopil (123 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anselmo Raguileo Lincopil (3 May 1922 - 29 February 1992) was a Chilean linguist, historian, researcher and poet of the Mapuche people. He developed the
Henri Ramirez (277 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henri Ramirez is a French-Brazilian linguist known especially for his research on Arawakan languages and other language families of the Amazonian region
Odi Gonzales (366 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Odi Gonzales (Calca, 1962) is a Peruvian writer, translator and university professor. His literary works are written in Quechua and Spanish. Odi Gonzales
Paul Rivet (774 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Cumana language (160 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Ninam language (238 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Press. ISBN 0-19-509427-1. Kaufman, Terrence. (1994). The native languages of South America. In C. Mosley & R. E. Asher (Eds.), Atlas of the world's languages
Macu (51 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
MACU may refer to: Macu, the name of several ethnic groups and languages of South America Macu, The Policeman's Woman, a 1987 Venezuelan film Mid-Atlantic
Andrés Febrés (182 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Andrés Febrés was 18th-century Spanish Jesuit active in Colonial Chile. He is best known for his book Arte de la lengua general del Reyno de Chile, con
Pablo Landeo Muñoz (374 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pablo Landeo Muñoz (Huancavelica, Perú, 1959) is a Peruvian award-winning writer, translator, and teacher of language and literature. His literary works
Asháninka language (505 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
America: The Clock Is Ticking." A Comprehensive Guide The Indigenous Languages of South America, 2012, 167-234. "Asháninka." Language, Alphabet and Pronunciation
Maku (148 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Manipur state, India Maku people, a name for several peoples and languages of South America Magu (deity), also spelled Ma-ku, a goddess in China Maku, the
Aguano (216 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Press. ISBN 0-19-509427-1. Kaufman, Terrence. (1994). The native languages of South America. In C. Mosley & R. E. Asher (Eds.), Atlas of the world's languages
Ramarama language (5,126 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
is a Tupian language of Brazil. Unusually for the indigenous languages of South America in general and Tupian in particular, Ramarama is a fairly analytic
Macushi language (784 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
endangerment in South America: The clock is ticking", The Indigenous Languages of South America, DE GRUYTER, doi:10.1515/9783110258035.167, ISBN 9783110258035
Shipibo language (775 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Press. ISBN 0-292-70414-3. Kaufman, Terrence. (1994). The native languages of South America. In C. Mosley & R. E. Asher (Eds.), Atlas of the world's languages
Pijao people (843 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
http://www.ethnologue.com). Kaufman, Terrence (1994). "The native languages of South America", in C. Mosley & R. E. Asher (Eds.), Atlas of the world's languages
Pre-Arawakan languages of the Greater Antilles (993 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1991) has speculated that they may have been related – not to the languages of South America as Taíno was – but to languages of Central America which had more
Wanham language (132 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Science of Human History. Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
QU (233 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and the Republic of China Myrocarpus frondosus, a plant Quechua languages, a group of Native American languages of South America (ISO 639-1 code "qu")
Fuegian languages (869 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
introduced by incoming Europeans (Aguilera 214). As the indigenous languages of South America have declined, the inhabitants of Tierra del Fuego have come to
Applicative voice (1,047 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Campbell, Lyle & Verónica Grondona (Eds.). (2012). The Indigenous Languages of South America: A Comprehensive Guide. Berlin, Germany: Walter de Gruyter. Jacques
Timote language (260 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Science of Human History. Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Bible translations into Native American languages (3,523 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Biblical translations into the indigenous languages of North and South America have been produced since the 16th century. Mark, translated by Peter Wzokhilain
Madí language (3,384 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
following. Jamamadi may share this system. Like all indigenous languages of South America, Madí was not written prior to Euro-American contact; moreover
Cabécar language (785 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
229-242. Umaña, A. C. (2012). Chibchan languages. The indigenous languages of South America: A comprehensive guide, 2, 391. Instituto Clodomiro Picado: Tkäbe
Embera language (521 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
de Verano. (in Spanish) Kaufman, Terrence. (1994). The Native Languages of South America. In C. Mosley & R. E. Asher (Eds.), Atlas of the World's Languages
Proto-Tupian (592 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics. 2. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. pp. 495–574
Lyle Campbell (874 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Campbell, Lyle and Verónica Grondona (Eds.) (2012). "The Indigenous Languages of South America: A Comprehensive Guide." Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. Campbell,
Terrence Kaufman (724 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
language change. Kaufman's proposed genealogy of the indigenous languages of South America (Kaufman 1990), which stands as the most thorough and well-founded
Palta people (61 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Britannica. Retrieved 6 January 2015. Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Tilde (5,784 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
usage has been adopted in the orthographies of several native languages of South America, such as Guarani and Nheengatu, as well as in the International
Spurious languages (2,929 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the indigenous languages of South America". In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics
Kaingang language (1,410 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center. Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Gran Chaco (2,938 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
In Grondona, Verónica; Campbell, Lyle (eds.). The Indigenous Languages of South America. The World of Linguistics. 2. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. pp. 625–668
Daha (64 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
DAHA, the abbreviation for double affine Hecke algebra Daha ("More"), a 2017 Turkish film, directed by Onur Saylak Macro-Daha languages of South America
Wariʼ language (2,312 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Ticking In Lyle Campbell & Verónica Grondona. (Eds.).The indigenous languages of south america : A comprehensive guide. (pp. 167-234). Daniel Everett and Barbara
Brazil (25,288 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
between indigenous languages in South America". The Indigenous Languages of South America: A Comprehensive Guide. Walter de Gruyter. p. 247. ISBN 978-3110258035
Leo Wetzels (2,200 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
theoretical discussion of the word-prosodic systems of the indigenous languages of South America. The study will be published[needs update] as a chapter of Rob
Maléku language (2,080 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Campbell, L., & Grondona, V. (Eds.). (2012). The indigenous languages of South America: A comprehensive guide (Vol. 2). Walter de Gruyter. Ramos Rivas
Wayampipukú language (39 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
closely related to Wayampi. Mouton, De Gruyter. "The Indigenous Languages of South America A Comprehensive Guide" (PDF). http://multitree.org/codes/1az.html
Karitiâna language (2,279 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Reduplication in Karitiana. In Reduplication in the Indigenous languages of South America. Gale Goodwin Gómez & Hein van der Voort (eds.). Brill's Studies
Northeast Region, Brazil (8,377 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
JSTOR 24719658. Campbell, Lyle; Grondona, Verónica (2012). The Indigenous Languages of South America: A Comprehensive Guide (illustrated ed.). Walter de Gruyter. ISBN 9783110258035
Chavín culture (6,060 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Inequality. p. 186. Campbell, Lyle; Grondona, Verónica. The Indigenous Languages of South America: A Comprehensive Guide. p. 588. Rick, John W. "Context, Construction
Tone (linguistics) (10,762 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Tzotzil of San Bartolo, Uspanteko, and one variety of Huave. Many languages of South America are tonal. For example, various analyses of the Pirahã language
Minoritized language (1,232 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
español-inglés en EEUU. Tokio, noviembre de 2002. Pág 2 "Indigenous Languages of South America". aboutworldlanguages.com. Retrieved 23 August 2018. Fox, Margalit
Kamayurá language (2,688 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"Tupían." In L. Campbell & V. Grondona (Eds.), The Indigenous Languages of South America. A Comprehensive Guide. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. 495–574. Seki
Zero copula (1,878 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
instance, in Korean and in the Eskimo languages. Many indigenous languages of South America do, however, have true zero copulae in which no overt free or
Janambre (141 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Maratino language Quinigua language Mason, John Alden (1950). "The languages of South America". In Steward, Julian (ed.). Handbook of South American Indians
Matsés language (4,364 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Campbell, Lyle; Grondona, Veronica, eds. (2012). The Indigenous Languages of South America: A Comprehensive Guide. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. ISBN 978-3-11-025513-3
Pre-Columbian trans-oceanic contact theories (13,907 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the word for sweet potato is shared by Polynesian languages and languages of South America. Proto-Polynesian *kumala (compare Easter Island kumara, Hawaiian
List of Latin-script digraphs (15,598 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Catalan, Fataluku in East Timor, as well as some indigenous languages of South America, for a voiceless postalveolar affricate /t͡ʃ/. In the orthography
Inalienable possession (5,203 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 182. Krasnoukhova, Olga (2011). "Attributive possession in the languages of South America". Linguistics in the Netherlands. 28 (1): 86–98. doi:10.1075/avt
Pedro de Añazco (229 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
grammars, "doctrines" and catechisms in nine different Indian languages of South America. Dávila, teatro eclesiastico de la primitiva Iglesia de las Indias
Talgua caves (2,400 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Salinas). Pech people, who speak a variation of the Chibchan languages of South America, can still be found in the Olancho Department in the area surrounding
Library of Congress Classification:Class P -- Language and Literature (4,323 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
3001-4566....Languages of Mexico and Central America 5001-7356....Languages of South America and the West Indies 7801-7895....Mixed languages 7831-7875...Creole
North Junín Quechua (985 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gale G.; van der Voort, Hein (2013). Reduplication in Indigenous Languages of South America. Leiden, NL: Brill. p. 42. "SAPhon – South American Phonological