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searching for Languages of Brazil 15 found (237 total)

alternate case: languages of Brazil

Arikem languages (97 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

The Arikem languages of Brazil form a branch of the Tupian language family. They are Karitiâna and the extinct Kabixiana and Arikem. Below is a list of
Munduruku languages (108 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Mundurukú languages of Brazil form a branch of the Tupian language family. They are Munduruku and the extinct Kuruáya. Below is a list of Mundurucú
Yuruna languages (170 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Yuruna languages (or Jurúna languages) of Brazil form a branch of the Tupian language family. They are Jurúna, Maritsauá, and Xipaya. Below is a list
Aricanduva (district of São Paulo) (132 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
southeast. The name Aricanduva originated from one of the indigenous languages of Brazil known as Tupi and means "place where there are many palm trees of
Coati (2,332 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
States. The name coatimundi purportedly derives from the Tupian languages of Brazil. The coati is also known in English as the hog-nosed coon. Adult
Aryon Rodrigues (416 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
considered one of the most renowned researchers of the indigenous languages of Brazil. In 1959, Rodrigues was the first Brazilian to obtain a PhD in linguistics
Matipu (153 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Socioambiental: Povos Indígenas no Brasil. Retrieved 15 March 2012 "Matipuhy." Ethnologue. 2009. Retrieved 15 March 2012. Languages of Brazil at Ethnologue
Robert M. W. Dixon (2,262 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
particularly noted for his work on the languages of Australia and the Arawá languages of Brazil. He has published grammars of Dyirbal, Yidiɲ, Warrgamay, Nyawaygi
Society of Jesus (17,744 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
people into villages, and created a writing system for the local languages of Brazil. José de Anchieta and Manuel da Nóbrega were the first Jesuits that
Denny Moore (320 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(help) "Project for the Audio-Video Documentation of the Indigenous Languages of Brazil". University of California, Berkeley. 25 October 1996. Retrieved
Liberdade street market (281 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Portuguese) Merging japanese culture: Ivoti community (Portuguese) "Languages of Brazil". Labeurb.unicamp.br. Retrieved May 6, 2009. Typical oriental food
George L. Trager (1,463 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in Philology, 43, 461–464. Trager, George L. (1948). The Indian languages of Brazil. International Journal of American Linguistics, 14 (1), 43–48. Trager
List of indigenous peoples of Brazil (479 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in Acre – Unidentified. List of indigenous territories (Brazil) "Languages of Brazil." Ethnologue. Retrieved 25 Feb 2013. "Table of the Indigenous peoples
Leo Wetzels (2,200 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(in terms of phonology, morphology, and syntax) of the Nambikwara languages of Brazil and propose a reconstruction of the Proto-Nambikwara sound system
List of extinct indigenous peoples of Brazil (1,173 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
copy as title (link) Ribeiro, D. (1967). Indigenous cultures and languages of Brazil. In J. H. Hopper (Ed.), Indians of Brazil in the Twentieth Century