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searching for Laigin 112 found (522 total)

alternate case: laigin

Battle of Móin Mhór (466 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

The Battle of Móin Mhór was fought in 1151 between the kingdoms of Leinster and Thomond in Ireland. The Kingdom of Leinster was victorious. The entire
Battle of Ros-Mhic-Thriúin (45 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Ros Mhic Thriúin took place in 1394 near New Ross, County Wexford, Ireland. It pitted the Norman Lordship of Ireland against the Kingdom
Siege of Wexford (1169) (770 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The siege of Wexford took place in early May 1169 and was the first major clash of the Norman invasion of Ireland. The town was besieged by a combined
Battle of Confey (1,139 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Confey or Cenn Fuait was a battle fought in Ireland in 917 between the Vikings of Dublin and the Irish King of Leinster, Augaire mac Ailella
Battle of Glenmama (3,049 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Glenn Máma (Irish: Cath Ghleann Máma, The Battle of "The Glen of the Gap") or Glenmama was a battle that took place, most probably near Lyons
Conchobar Abradruad (167 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
File, son of Ros Ruad, son of Ferhus Fairgge, son of Nuadu Necht, of the Laigin, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High
Ailill mac Dúnlainge (died 871) (398 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
of Leinster of the Uí Muiredaig sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. This sept had their royal seat at Maistiu (Mullaghmast) in South Kildare
Murchad mac Brain Mut (558 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mut (died 727) was a King of Leinster from the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. He was the son of Bran Mut mac Conaill (died 696), a previous king. He
Muiredach mac Murchado (395 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. He was the son of Murchad mac Brain Mut (died 727), a previous king. He ruled from 738 to 760. The Laigin had suffered a crushing
Ruaidrí mac Fáeláin (443 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
King of Leinster of the Uí Fáeláin sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. He was the son of Fáelán mac Murchado (died 738), a previous king. This
Muiredach mac Ruadrach (484 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
King of Leinster of the Uí Fáeláin sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. This sept had their royal seat at Naas in the eastern part of the Liffey
Bran Ardchenn (434 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Leinster of the Uí Muiredaig sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. He was the son of Muiredach mac Murchado (died 760), a previous king. This
Bran Mut mac Conaill (243 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Conaill (died 693) was a king of Leinster from the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. He was the grandson of Fáelán mac Colmáin (died 666), a previous king.
Fáelchar ua Máele Ódrain (211 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Leinster, the Laigin, are recorded in the annals for the seventh and eight centuries. In 693, Fáelchar was slain in a battle with the Laigin. His son Cellach
Cellach mac Brain (290 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Leinster of the Uí Muiredaig sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. This sept had their royal seat at Maistiu (Mullaghmast) in South Kildare
Fiannamail mac Máele Tuile (272 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tuile (died 680) was a King of Leinster from the Uí Máil branch of the Laigin. He was the great-grandson of Áed Dibchine mac Senaig (died 595), a previous
Lorcán mac Cellaig (311 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Leinster of the Uí Muiredaig sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. This sept had their royal seat at Maistiu (Mullaghmast) in the south of
Fáelán mac Colmáin (578 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Colmáin (died 666) was a King of Leinster from the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. He was the son of Colmán Már mac Coirpri, a previous king. Faelan was the
Áed mac Colggen (611 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Leinster during a time of Uí Neill weakness. In 732 Aed and the southern Laigin (Laigin Desgabair) repulsed the Munstermen. Áed, along with many other kings
Niall Frossach (545 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tuaiscert). In 756 conflict with Domnall broke out and Domnall led a force of Laigin with him as far as Mag Muirtheimne in modern County Louth. This region had
Crimthann mac Áedo (397 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
mac Áedo (died 633) was a King of Leinster from the Uí Máil branch of the Laigin. He was the son of Áed Dibchine mac Senaig (died 595), a previous king.
Congalach mac Conaing (429 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
797) against Leinster. They separately attacked the Uí Théig branch of the Laigin and crushed them at the Battle of Ath Cliath. However many of them were
Fland Dá Chongal (436 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ua Congaile (flourished late 7th century) was a king of the Uí Failge, a Laigin people of County Offaly. Fland is not mentioned in the annals of Ireland
Túathal mac Máele-Brigte (280 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Leinster of the Uí Muiredaig sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. This sept had their royal seat at Maistiu (Mullaghmast) in South Kildare
Dúnlaing mac Muiredaig (302 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Leinster of the Uí Muiredaig sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. This sept had their royal seat at Maistiu (Mullaghmast) in South Kildare
Áed Dibchine (243 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Senaig (died 595) was a King of Leinster from the Uí Máil branch of the Laigin. He is the first king of this branch to hold the overlordship of Leinster
Bodleian Library, MS Rawlinson B 502 (2,280 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
nairegda Cathair, Laigin genealogies f. 68v Laigin genealogies (Dál Niad Cuirp). chasm lacuna f. 69r Laigin genealogies (continued) f. 69r Laigin genealogies
Muiredach mac Brain (566 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
King of Leinster of the Uí Dúnchada sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. This sept had their royal seat at Líamhain (Lyons Hill, on the Dublin-Kildare
Cathal mac Áeda (428 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Chernaig sept of Lagore of the Síl nÁedo Sláine. He was the son of Áed Laigin mac Néill (died 722) and great-great grandson of the high king Diarmait
Short Annals of Leinster (204 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Short Annals of Leinster, aka Annala Gearr Laigin, is an Irish annal, covering the years 593 to 1607. It was created by a number of unknown scribes
Bran Becc mac Murchado (316 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Murchado (died 738) was a King of Leinster from the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. He was the son of Murchad mac Brain Mut (died 727), a previous king. He
Bran ua Máele Dúin (378 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
South Leinster. He was of the Sil Máeluidir sept of this branch of the Laigin, who were found in the later baronies of Shelmalier on the lower reaches
Laidcnén mac Con Mella (276 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
South Leinster. He was of the Sil Máeluidir sept of this branch of the Laigin, who were found in the later baronies of Shelmalier on the lower reaches
Fiachu mac Néill (443 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Druim Derg. By this victory the plain of Mide was taken away from the Laigin. Fiachu was ancestor of the Cenél Fiachach, a clan which included several
Dúnchad mac Murchada (270 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Murchada (died 728) was a King of Leinster from the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. He was the son of Murchad mac Brain Mut (died 727), the previous king.
Cummascach mac Flainn (158 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cummascach mac Flainn (died 757) was a king of the Uí Failge, a Laigin people of County Offaly. He was one of the many sons of Fland Dá Chongal, a previous
Bran mac Fáeláin (260 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
King of Leinster of the Uí Dúnchada sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. This sept had their royal seat at Líamhain (Lyons Hill, on the Dublin-Kildare
Muiredach mac Brain (died 818) (392 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
of Leinster of the Uí Muiredaig sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. This sept had their royal seat at Maistiu (Mullaghmast) in South Kildare
Brandub mac Echach (819 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was slain, stopping the southward expansion of the Uí Néill. The Borúma Laigin (Cattle Tribute of Leinster) and the annals record that the war was caused
Cú Chongelt mac Con Mella (277 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cheinnselaig of South Leinster or Laigin Desgabair. He was of the Sil Máeluidir sept of this branch of the Laigin, who were found in the later baronies
Sechnassach mac Colggen (229 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Uí Cheinnselaig of South Leinster or Laigin Desgabair. He was of the Sil Chormaic sept of this branch of the Laigin. His father Colcú mac Bressail (died
Crundmáel Erbuilc (470 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(died 656) was a King of Leinster from the Uí Cheinnselaig branch of the Laigin. He was the son of Rónán mac Colmáin (died 625), a previous king of the
Fergal mac Máele Dúin (835 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ravaged until the cattle-tribute was accepted and took hostages from the Laigin. A truce was made with Cathal as well. The Leinstermen broke the truce however
8th century in Ireland (1,608 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
at the Battle of Finnabair (Fennor, County Kildare) in a fight among the Laigin. 721 Cathal mac Finguine becomes King of Munster, reigning until his death
Muirecán mac Diarmata (344 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
King of Leinster of the Uí Fáeláin sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. This sept had their royal seat at Naas in the eastern part of the Liffey
Cerball mac Muirecáin (475 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Annals of Ulster report: Cerball son of Muirecán, an excellent king of the Laigin, died of a sickness. Given the biases of the Annals of Ulster, it is understood
Mugrón mac Flainn (236 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mugrón mac Flainn (died 782) was a king of the Uí Failge, a Laigin people of County Offaly. He was one of the many sons of Fland Dá Chongal, a previous
Cennselach mac Brain (217 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
South Leinster. He was of the Sil Máeluidir sept of this branch of the Laigin, who were found in the later baronies of Shelmalier on the lower reaches
Donngal mac Laidcnén (227 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
South Leinster. He belonged to the Sil Chormaic sept of this branch of the Laigin and specifically to a branch which took over leadership of the Uí Dróna
Cináed mac Mugróin (165 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cináed mac Mugróin (died 829) was a king of the Uí Failge, a Laigin people of County Offaly, Ireland. He was the son of Mugrón mac Flainn (died 782), a
Cináed mac Flainn (232 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cináed mac Flainn (died 770) was the king of the Uí Failge, a Laigin people of County Offaly. He was one of the many sons of Fland Dá Chongal, a previous
Fínsnechta Cethardec (525 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
King of Leinster of the Uí Dúnchada sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. He was the son of Cellach mac Dúnchada (died 776), a previous king. He
Dub Calgaid mac Laidcnén (178 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
South Leinster. He belonged to the Sil Chormaic sept of this branch of the Laigin and specifically to a branch which took over leadership of the Uí Dróna
Áed mac Ainmuirech (1,040 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Neill encroachment. According to the saga tradition preserved in the Borúma Laigin (Cattle Tribute of Leinster), Brandub had killed Cummascach, the son of
Óengus mac Mugróin (247 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Óengus mac Mugróin (died 803) was a king of the Uí Failge, a Laigin people of County Offaly. He was the son of Mugrón mac Flainn (died 782), a previous
Ailill mac Áedo Róin (194 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ailill mac Áedo Róin (died 639) was a king of the Uí Failge, a Laigin people of County Offaly. He was the son of Áed Rón mac Cathail (died 604), a previous
Flaithnia mac Flainn (174 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Flaithnia mac Flainn (died 755) was a king of the Uí Failge, a Laigin people of County Offaly. He was one of the many sons of Fland Dá Chongal, a previous
Fáelán mac Murchado (439 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Murchado (died 738) was a King of Leinster from the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. He was the son of Murchad mac Brain Mut (died 727), a previous king. He
Cellach Tosach mac Donngaile (188 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
South Leinster. He belonged to the Sil Chormaic sept of this branch of the Laigin and specifically to a branch which took over leadership of the Uí Dróna
Cellach Tosach mac Donngaile (188 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
South Leinster. He belonged to the Sil Chormaic sept of this branch of the Laigin and specifically to a branch which took over leadership of the Uí Dróna
Áed Rón mac Cathail (313 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Áed Rón mac Cathail (died 604) was a king of the Uí Failge, a Laigin people of County Offaly. He was the grandson of Bruidge mac Nath Í (died 579), a previous
Domnall mac Flaíthnia (145 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Domnall mac Flaíthnia (died 783) was a king of the Uí Failge, a Laigin people of County Offaly. He was the son of Flaithnia mac Flainn (died 755), a previous
Forbassach Ua Congaile (191 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Forbassach Ua Congaile (died 714) was a king of the Uí Failge, a Laigin people of County Offaly. The king lists in the Book of Leinster give him a reign
Artrí mac Cathail (396 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
expedition by the high king Donnchad Midi (died 797) is recorded to aid the laigin versus Munster but Artrí is not directly connected with this. Artrí may
Flaíthnia mac Cináeda (183 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Flaíthnia mac Cináeda (died 806) was a king of the Uí Failge, a Laigin people of County Offaly. He was the son of Cináed mac Flainn (died 770), a previous
Cillíne mac Forannáin (239 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cillíne mac Forannáin (died 652) was a king of the Uí Failge, a Laigin people of County Offaly. He was the great grandson of a brother (Máel Uma) of Áed
Niall Caille (1,206 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Leinster. The Annals of Ulster say "Niall led an army to Laigin and he set up a king over the Laigin". His chosen candidate as king of Leinster was Bran mac
Bruidge mac Nath Í (202 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bruidge mac Nath Í (died 579) was a king of the Uí Failge, a Laigin people of County Offaly. He was the grandson of Failge Berraide, the eponymous ancestor
Domnall mac Muirecáin (385 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
King of Leinster of the Uí Fáeláin sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. This sept had their royal seat at Naas in the eastern part of the Liffey
Diarmait mac Conaing (319 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was fought between the Síl nÁedo Sláine and the Uí Garrchon branch of the Laigin and their king Cú Chongalt was slain. Donnchad had subdued Brega in 778
Máel Dúin mac Fergusa (315 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was fought between the Síl nÁedo Sláine and the Uí Garrchon branch of the Laigin and their king Cú Chongalt was slain. Donnchad had subdued Brega in 778
Fogartach mac Cummascaig (298 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rig fought between the Síl nÁedo Sláine and the Uí Garrchon branch of the Laigin with his cousin Máel Dúin mac Fergusa (died 785), who was King of Loch gabor
Cathal mac Dúnlainge (283 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
South Leinster. He was of the Sil Máeluidir sept of this branch of the Laigin, who were found in the later baronies of Shelmalier on the lower reaches
Murchad mac Máele Dúin (466 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(near modern Dublin) while Conchobor with the southern Uí Néill and the Laigin moved northwards. However no battle ensued. In 822 Murchad made another
7th century in Ireland (2,938 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Annals of Tigernach includes his death obit with the title King of Laigin, that is King of Leinster These annals interpolated dates for some Leinster
Rónán mac Colmáin (573 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Annals of Tigernach includes his death obit with the title King of Laigin. These annals interpolated dates for some Leinster kings in this period
Cináed mac Írgalaig (576 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Leinstermen at the Battle of Maíne and he received what he wanted from the Laigin. The remains of Saint Adomnán were brought over to Ireland and his law was
Uí Dúnchada (325 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
derived from three sons of Murchad mac Brain Mut of Uí Dúnlainge, king of Laigin (d. 727). "The third brother, Dúnchad mac Murchada (d. 728), was ancestor
Faílbe Flann mac Áedo Duib (502 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Crimthann was slain. A Munster tract claims that Faílbe paid the tribute of the Laigin to the Ui Neill but Byrne dismisses this as later Munster propaganda to
River Boyne (739 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
AI770.2 The battle of Bolg Bóinne [gained] against the Uí Néill, by the Laigin. Aerial view of the River Boyne estuary and Drogheda. River Boyne at Trim
Fogartach mac Néill (748 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
one of these, at the battle of Allen, on 11 December 722. His brother Áed Laigin was slain in this battle. Fogartach replaced Fergal as High King, but himself
Fínsnechta Fledach (805 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Fínsnechta Fledach undertook an expedition against Leinster when the Laigin refused to pay the cattle tribute. The Leinster king Bran Mut mac Conaill
Derbforgaill ingen Maeleachlainn (2,101 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
chiefly remembered for her abduction by Diarmait Mac Murchada, king of Laigin (Leinster) in 1152, a supposed catalyst for the late twelfth-century English
Loingsech (43 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Labraid Loingsech, a legendary high king of Ireland and ancestor of the Laigin Loingsech mac Colmáin (died 655), king of Leinster Loingsech mac Óengusso
Teltown (313 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dubhloch. The Annals of Inisfallen states that "Muiredach son of Bran, king of Laigin, harried UíNéill as far as Sliab Fuait, and the Fair of Tailtiu was held
Niall mac Cernaig Sotal (531 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
slain in battle by Flann mac Áedo (died 714) of the Síl nDlúthaig sept. Áed Laigin (died 722),slain at the Battle of Allen in the great defeat of the Ui Neill
Fedelmid mac Crimthainn (985 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
checked at Temuir, and he seized Gormlaith, daughter of Murchad, king of Laigin, together with her female train, and Indrechtach, son of Mael Dúin, was
Fráech mac Finchada (287 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dublin: Four Courts Press, ISBN 978-1-85182-196-9 Book of Leinster,Rig Laigin at CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts at University College Cork Ireland,
Annals of Ulster (2,259 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tethba were plundered. There was a naval camp at Duiblinn from which the Laigin and the Uí Néill were plundered, both states and churches, as far as Sliab
Ollamh Síol Muireadaigh (523 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1551 Ollamh Érenn Ollamh Tuisceairt Ollamh Airgialla Ollamh Ulaidh Ollamh Laigin Ollamh Osraighe Ollamh Desmumu Ollamh Thomond Ollamh Mumu Ollamh Ormond
Cairpre Gabra (1,565 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
namely the "Cairpri Laigin", the "Cairpri Gabra", and "Cairpri Dromma Cliab" though current thinking now believes "Cairpri Laigin" was a later construct
Calverstown (1,312 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Uchbad (Ballyshannon, Grid reference N78830), Aed Allin defeated the Laigin and established Kildare’s hegemony over the kingship of Leinster that would
Ollamh Clanricarde (199 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
died. Ollamh Érenn Ollamh Tuisceairt Ollamh Airgialla Ollamh Ulaidh Ollamh Laigin Ollamh Osraighe Ollamh Desmumu Ollamh Thomond Ollamh Mumu Ollamh Ormond
Tailteann Games (ancient) (1,539 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
championships. See Annals of Inisfallen AI875.1 Kl. Muiredach son of Bran, king of Laigin, harried UíNéill as far as Sliab Fuait, and the Fair of Tailltiu was held
Áed Findliath (1,717 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
According to the Annals of Ulster he defeated "the Uí Neíll of Brega, and the Laigin, and a large force of the foreigners" in a battle at a place called Cell
County Wexford (5,019 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Diarmuid Mac Murrough, King of Uí Cheinnsealaig and king of Leinster (Laigin). This was followed by the subsequent colonisation of the country by the
Áed Oirdnide (2,200 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
abbot of Cell Mór Enir (modern Kilmore, County Armagh) was killed by the Laigin. As a result, Áed led another expedition versus Leinster and laid waste
History of Ireland (1169–1536) (2,923 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
partitioned by the more powerful kingdoms all around it. The kingship of Laigin (Leinster) was by this time held by Uí Cheinnselaig dynasty, who had replaced
Cellach mac Cerbaill (559 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
“ AI908.2: The battle of Mag Ailbe gained by the Laigin and the Uí Néill over the Munstermen, in which Cormac son of Cuilennán, king of Caisel, and Cellach
Coirpre Cromm mac Crimthainn (587 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
High-Kings (2nd ed.). Dublin: Four Courts Press. ISBN 978-1-85182-196-9 Rig Laigin in the Book of Leinster, ed. R.I. Best; Osborn Bergin; M.A. O'Brien; Anne
Máel Ruain (1,274 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
776), who came from the Uí Dúnchada sept of the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin, but there is no contemporary authority from the annals to support the statement
Waterford (6,681 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
devastated Osraige in the same year, and its churches, and the churches of Laigin, and the fortifications of both were laid waste, and Gilla Pátraic, son
History of Ireland (13,048 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
century that the main over-kingdoms of In Tuisceart, Airgialla, Ulaid, Mide, Laigin, Mumhain, Cóiced Ol nEchmacht began to emerge (see Kingdoms of ancient Ireland)
Kingdom of Gwynedd (12,509 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Anglesey and elsewhere in northwest Wales, with the name Llŷn derived from Laigin, an Old Irish form that means "of Leinster". The region became known as
Énna Mac Murchada (1,927 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/20524. Retrieved 7 March 2013. Wiley, DM (2005). "Laigin". In Duffy, S (ed.). Medieval Ireland: An Encyclopedia. New York: Routledge
Flann Sinna (4,241 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
some notable successes against the Vikings, and was active against the Laigin. However, his kingship was not accepted even among the southern Uí Néill
The Tale of Mac Da Thó's Pig (4,556 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dá with a long a and make Thó alliterate with t. "Index of Proper Names: Laigin". Vassar College. Retrieved 13 June 2010. Chadwick, p 81 Thurneysen, p i
Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain (20,449 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
is from the locations of inscription stones given in File:Britain.Deisi.Laigin.jpg as of 2010[update]-10-11, which cites its sources of information. Throughout
List of monastic houses in County Kildare (287 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
monastic site, founded 6th century? by St Abban, son of Cormac, King of Laigin Mag-arnaide; Maghinemna; Moyarney 52°54′22″N 6°55′32″W / 52.906210°N 6
Cerball mac Dúnlainge (4,632 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
rewriting in Cerball's time and immediately afterwards, attaching them to the Laigin of Leinster. It has been suggested that the importance of Cerball in Icelandic
List of monastic houses in Ireland (4,828 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
monastic site, founded 6th century? by St Abban, son of Cormac, King of Laigin Mag-arnaide; Maghinemna; Moyarney Monasterevin Monastery # early monastic
History of County Wexford (9,910 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Diarmuid Mac Murrough, King of Uí Cheinnsealaig and King of Leinster (Laigin), which led to the subsequent colonisation of the country by the Anglo-Normans