Find link

Find link is a tool written by Edward Betts.

searching for King Comics (Raj Comics) 57 found (67 total)

alternate case: king Comics (Raj Comics)

Red King (comics) (73 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Red King, in comics, may refer to: Red King (DC Comics), a DC Comics supervillain Marvel Comics characters: Red King, a leading character in Planet Hulk
Return of the King (comics) (152 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Return of the King" is a five-issue Daredevil story arc written by Ed Brubaker with art by Michael Lark and David Aja and published by Marvel Comics.
King Standish (467 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
King Standish is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe. King Standish first appeared in Flash Comics (vol. 1) #3 (March 1940), and was created
White King (comics) (116 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
stepped down White King (disambiguation) Red King (comics), the White King-equivalent rank in the London branch of the Hellfire Club Black King (comics)
Black King (comics) (78 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
organizer of Suicide Squad Maxwell Lord, former organizer of the Justice League Black King (disambiguation) White King (comics) Black Queen (comics)
1936 in comics (633 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Popular Comics #2 - Dell Comics Famous Funnies #21 - Eastern Color King Comics #1 - David McKay Publications Popular Comics #3 - Dell Comics Tip Top
1937 in comics (1,100 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Funnies #4 - Dell Comics Funny Picture Stories #3 - Centaur Publications King Comics #10 - David McKay Publications More Fun Comics (1936 series) #17 - National
Clock King (2,679 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Clock King is the name of two fictional characters, both of whom are supervillains published by DC Comics. The first, created by Bill Finger, appeared
Dragon King (comics) (43 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dragon King, in comics, may refer to: Dragon King (DC Comics), a WWII-era DC Comics supervillain Dragon King, a Marvel Comics character from the MC2 universe
David McKay Publications (595 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the first comic books, including the long-running titles Ace Comics, King Comics, and Magic Comics; as well as collections of such popular comic strips
Shadow King (4,707 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For the band of the same name, see Shadow King (band). For the video game, see Okage. The Shadow King, also known as Amahl Farouk, is a fictional character
John King (comics) (882 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John King is a fictional character in Marvel Comics. King first appeared in the MAX miniseries the Hood issue one in 2002, appearing in all six issues
Raj Comics (850 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
publishing Raj Comics and King Comics simultaneously. King comics only lasted for around 2 years. After that, some heroes of King Comics, like Gamraj, were merged
Aquaman (8,434 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Arthur Curry" redirects here. For the Canadian military general, see Arthur Currie. Aquaman is a superhero appearing in comic book titles by DC Comics
Ace Comics (1,279 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
strips introduced by McKay in their King Comics title in April 1936; some of the strips transferred from King Comics from issue #1. Ace Comics #11, the
Iketeru Futari (2,015 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Takashi Sano. It was serialized in the Shōnen Gahosha magazine Young King Comics from 1997 to 2010 for a total of 33 volumes. The 1999 animated television
King Features Syndicate (2,913 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
manager. King Features vice president Bradley Kelly (1894-1969) was a King comics editor during the 1940s. Sylvan Byck (1904-1982) was the head editor
Bill Lignante (254 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
book(Interior Art) for Gold Key Comics,From issue 1-18; Continuing the Book For King Comics, Thru issue 28 and he also contributed to Charlton Comics, when they
Alley Award (3,467 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wood Cover - Flash Gordon #1, by Al Williamson  (King Comics) Coloring - Flash Gordon  (King Comics) Best Full-Length Story - "How Green was My Goblin"
List of manga publishers (623 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(Taiwan) Ever Glory Publishing (Taiwan) Sharp Point Publishing (Taiwan) King Comics Hong Kong (Hong Kong) Culturecom Comics (Hong Kong) Jade Dynasty (Hong
1967 in comics (1,770 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
canceled by Charlton. Captain Atom, with issue #89, canceled by Charlton. King Comics, with issue #11, publishes its final issue of Flash Gordon. October
1950 in comics (381 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
comic book phenomenon, are disappearing. Ace Comics, Magic Comics, and King Comics end their long runs. Attempts to bring out single character comic strip
Flash Gordon (5,311 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
comics, either reprints or original stories. David McKay Publications King Comics #1–155 (1936–1949) [strip reprints] Dell Comics Four Color Comics #10
Bela Zaboly (478 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Much of Zaboly's work was reprinted in Magic Comics, "Dagwood" and King Comics. Potrzebie Lambiek Grandinetti, Fred M. Popeye: An Illustrated Cultural
Little Annie Rooney (759 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was seen in comic book reprints—David McKay's Feature Book #11 (1938), King Comics, a 1948 three-issue series published by St. John and the Treasury of
King of the Royal Mounted (596 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Book SW119-1405 Feature Book #1 (David McKay Publications, May 1937) King Comics (David McKay Publications) — series published 1936–1949 Famous Feature
Brick Bradford (2,248 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
comic-book form as King Features began to expand into that genre, including King Comics (published by David McKay Publications), starting from April 1936 (along
Blondie (comic strip) (3,872 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
commemorative postage stamps. Chic Young's Blondie (1947–1949) David McKay/King Comics, 15 issues Dagwood Splits the Atom (1949) King Features (Public services
Ralph Macchio (comics) (629 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
December 12, 2010.  Hudson, Laura (October 15, 2007). "From Spidey to King: Comics vet to adapt Stephen King's Dark Tower series". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved
Black Queen (comics) (98 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
events around The OMAC Project Sasha Bordeaux, in the post-Infinite Crisis line-up Black Queen (disambiguation) White Queen (comics) Black King (comics)
George Wildman (575 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
began producing art for Charlton Comics in Derby, Connecticut. When King Comics ceased publication of its Popeye title, Charlton acquired the rights
Reed Crandall (1,453 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Comics, and space opera science fiction in King Features Syndicate's King Comics comic-book version of the syndicate's long-running hero Flash Gordon
1969 in comics (1,499 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
issue #12, is picked up by Charlton Comics, taking over from the defunct King Comics. Strange Adventures, with issue #217, becomes a reprint title. (DC Comics)
Mandrake the Magician (2,822 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
original stories by Stan Campell and written by Paul Newman. In 1966-67, King Comics published ten issues of a Mandrake the Magician comic book. Most of the
Bill Pearson (American writer) (993 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
for a wide variety of publishers, including Gold Key, Tower Comics, King Comics (Flash Gordon), Charlton, Eclipse, Gladstone and Warren Publications
Bringing Up Father (2,719 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Close Shave] (1921) Bringing Up Father was a feature of David McKay's King Comics title from No. 60 to No. 135 (1941–1947) Jiggs and Maggie Standard Comics
Bob Gustafson (363 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bailey comic books published by Dell Publishing/Western (early 1960s), King Comics (mid-1960s) and Charlton Comics (early 1970s). He drew Robert Baldwin's
Prince Valiant (3,228 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Foster. Many Foster strips were reprinted in the pages of Ace Comics and King Comics. Not reprints are seven Dell four-color Prince Valiant comic books (#567
André LeBlanc (artist) (282 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the 1979 epic Picture Bible published by David C Cooke. He drew for King Comics' Mandrake the Magician comic book. His various features for comic books
Cancer (comics) (747 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
killed with the rest of the Zodiac by Weapon X. Main article: John King (comics) The original Cancer dresses in a crab-like costume. He wears pincer-like
List of manga distributors (476 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(Taiwan) Ever Glory Publishing (Taiwan) Sharp Point Publishing (Taiwan) King Comics Hong Kong (Hong Kong) Culturecom Comics (Hong Kong) Jade Dynasty (Hong
List of manga distributors (476 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(Taiwan) Ever Glory Publishing (Taiwan) Sharp Point Publishing (Taiwan) King Comics Hong Kong (Hong Kong) Culturecom Comics (Hong Kong) Jade Dynasty (Hong
Red Queen (comics) (197 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Vengeance of Vampirella" storyline Red Queen (disambiguation) Red King (comics) Red Queen (Crazy Gang) at the Comic Book DB Red Queen (Hope Pym)
Western comics (2,999 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
McKay Publications's Feature Book #1 (May 1937) and a single issue of King Comics (also 1937) featured King of the Royal Mounted reprints before Dell took
List of Charlton Comics publications (44 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wild West Blondie Comics #177 - 222 Feb 1969 - Nov 1976 continued from King Comics series Blue Beetle series 2 #18 - 21 Feb 1955 - Aug 1955 formerly The
Kinkeshi (1,024 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the early '00s. In South Korea, where the manga was early published by King Comics, Kinnukuman is known as "근육맨".[citation needed] Few years later, a third
Beetle Bailey (5,233 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The first series was published by Dell Comics, then Gold Key Comics, King Comics and Charlton Comics. Harvey Comics ran a much later second series, from
Marvel One-Shots (3,937 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Punchlines, LGBT Visibility and Marvel Studios’ One-Shot ‘All Hail The King’". Comics Alliance. Archived from the original on July 8, 2014. Retrieved July
Wally Wood (4,601 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Patrol Total War, Fantastic Voyage), Harvey (Unearthly Spectaculars), King Comics (Jungle Jim), Atlas/Seaboard (The Destructor), Youthful Comics (Capt
Toshio Maeda (1,315 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(弾かれた放課後?) (1990), 1 volume Okkake Datenshi (おっかけ堕天使?) (1990), Gekiga King Comics, 1 volume Kikō Jinruiten BODY (機甲人類伝BODY?) (1991), Wani Magazine Comics
List of manhua (259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Digimon: Digital Monsters List of Lianhuanhua Fluid Friction Comics King Comics Jonesky Publishing / Comics World All translations prior to year 2000
Popeye (8,804 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
978-1-60699-483-2) There have been a number of Popeye comic books, from Dell, King Comics, Gold Key Comics, Charlton Comics and others, originally written and
Stan Pitt (1,492 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
onto Peter James. At the time Pitt commenced illustrating Yarmak-Jungle King comics, for Young's Merchandising, in November 1949, which he continued until
H. P. Lovecraft (11,612 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
including author and artist Clive Barker, prolific horror writer Stephen King, comics writers Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman and Mike Mignola, film directors John
The Phantom (11,461 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
published the Phantom. In 1962, Gold Key Comics took over, followed by King Comics in 1966 and Charlton Comics in 1969. This lasted until 1977, with a total
Alan Class Comics (2,328 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
including sale of his collection List of Alan Class comics containing stories featuring King Comics characters Alan Class Comics at "Taint The Meat website
United States in the 1950s (8,311 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
previous decade. Newspaper comic strip reprint books such as Ace Comics and King Comics ended their decade-long runs while caped crimefighters and superheroes