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Longer titles found: History of the United Kingdom (1945–present) (view), History of the United Kingdom during the First World War (view), Military history of the United Kingdom during World War II (view), Military history of the United Kingdom (view), Political history of the United Kingdom (1945–present) (view), Economic history of the United Kingdom (view), Maritime history of the United Kingdom (view), Social history of the United Kingdom (1945–present) (view)

searching for History of the United Kingdom 451 found (1298 total)

alternate case: history of the United Kingdom

War Office (2,323 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

The War Office was a Department of the British Government responsible for the administration of the British Army between 1857 and 1964, when its functions
Lists of United Kingdom MPs (508 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Following is a (currently incomplete) list of past Members of Parliament of the United Kingdom in alphabetical order. See List of United Kingdom MPs: A
COVID-19 pandemic in Akrotiri and Dhekelia (443 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the British Overseas Territory of Akrotiri and Dhekelia in March 2020. On 12 January 2020, the World
Plebs (1,990 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The plebeians, also called plebs, were, in ancient Rome, the general body of free Roman citizens who were not patricians, as determined by the census or
Royal Historical Society (547 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Royal Historical Society, founded 1868, is a learned society of the United Kingdom which advances scholarly studies of history. The society was founded
J. Samuel White (898 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
J. Samuel White was a British shipbuilding firm based in East Cowes, taking its name from John Samuel White (1838–1915). It came to prominence during the
British idealism (830 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A subset of absolute idealism, British idealism was a philosophical movement that was influential in Britain from the mid-nineteenth century to the early
Anglo-Spanish War (1796–1808) (900 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Anglo-Spanish War was a conflict fought between 1796 and 1802, and again from 1804 to 1808, as part of the Coalition Wars. The war ended when an alliance
Hilda Kean (562 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hilda Kean is a British historian who specializes in public and cultural history, and in particular the cultural history of animals. She is former Dean
Postage stamps and postal history of Great Britain (3,494 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
various historical territories until the present day. The postal history of the United Kingdom is notable in at least two respects: first, for the introduction
Great Britain Historical GIS (2,186 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Great Britain Historical GIS (or GBHGIS), is a spatially enabled database that documents and visualises the changing human geography of the British
Alabama Claims (1,928 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Alabama Claims were a series of demands for damages sought by the government of the United States from the United Kingdom in 1869, for the attacks
War of the Second Coalition (2,448 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The War of the Second Coalition (1798–1802) was the second war on revolutionary France by most of the European monarchies, led by Britain, Austria and
Airfields of Britain Conservation Trust (161 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Airfields of Britain Conservation Trust (ABCT), founded 2006, is a non-profit organisation that works to preserve and protect airfields in Great Britain
The Suffragette Handkerchief (853 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Suffragette Handkerchief is a handkerchief displayed at The Priest House, West Hoathly in West Sussex, England. It has sixty-six embroidered signatures
Anglo-Turkish War (1807–1809) (332 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Anglo-Ottoman War was a conflict that took place during the Napoleonic Wars between 1807 and 1809. In the summer of 1806, during the War of the Third
Combined Operations Headquarters (523 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Combined Operations Headquarters was a department of the British War Office set up during Second World War to harass the Germans on the European continent
Walcheren Campaign (1,315 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Walcheren Campaign was an unsuccessful British expedition to the Netherlands in 1809 intended to open another front in the Austrian Empire's struggle
English Renaissance (1,674 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The English Renaissance was a cultural and artistic movement in England dating from the late 15th century to the early 17th century. It is associated with
Anglo-Swedish War (1810–1812) (563 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
During the Napoleonic Wars until 1810, Sweden and Great Britain were allies in the war against Napoleon. As a result of Sweden's defeat in the Finnish
Tamworth Manifesto (374 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tamworth Manifesto was a political manifesto issued by Sir Robert Peel in 1834 in Tamworth, which is widely credited by historians as having laid down
London Naval Treaty (1,059 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The London Naval Treaty (officially the Treaty for the Limitation and Reduction of Naval Armament) was an agreement between Great Britain, Japan, France
Three-Day Week (1,372 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Three-Day Week was one of several measures introduced in the United Kingdom by the Conservative government to conserve electricity, the generation
Inland Revenue (1,246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Inland Revenue was, until April 2005, a department of the British Government responsible for the collection of direct taxation, including income tax
Operation Unthinkable (1,630 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Operation Unthinkable was the name given to two related but unrealised plans by the Western Allies against the Soviet Union. The creation of the plans
History of the formation of the United Kingdom (5,984 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The formation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland has involved personal and political union across Great Britain and the wider
Anglo-Irish people (3,343 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anglo-Irish (Irish: Angla-Éireannach) is a term which was more commonly used in the 19th and early 20th centuries to identify a social class in Ireland
Teddy Boy (2,137 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Teddy Boys or Teds were a mainly British subculture of young men wearing clothes partly inspired by the styles worn by dandies in the Edwardian period
Assizes (1,567 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The courts of assize, or assizes (/əˈsaɪzɪz/), were periodic courts held around England and Wales until 1972, when together with the quarter sessions they
War Department (United Kingdom) (386 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The War Department was the United Kingdom government department responsible for the supply of equipment to the armed forces of the United Kingdom and the
Air Ministry (2,929 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Air Ministry was a department of the Government of the United Kingdom with the responsibility of managing the affairs of the Royal Air Force, that
Season (society) (1,711 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The social season, or season, refers to the traditional annual period when it is customary for members of a social elite of society to hold balls, dinner
Baring crisis (435 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Baring crisis or the Panic of 1890 was an acute recession. Although less serious than other panics of the era, it is the nineteenth century’s most
Clockwork Orange (plot) (565 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Clockwork Orange was a secret British security services project alleged to have involved a right-wing smear campaign against British politicians from 1974
Baring crisis (435 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Baring crisis or the Panic of 1890 was an acute recession. Although less serious than other panics of the era, it is the nineteenth century’s most
Knight of the shire (1,191 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Knight of the shire (Latin: milites comitatus) was the formal title for a member of parliament (MP) representing a county constituency in the British House
Bloomsbury Group (3,475 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bloomsbury Group—or Bloomsbury Set—was a group of associated English writers, intellectuals, philosophers and artists in the first half of the 20th
Pastry War (963 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Pastry War (Spanish: Guerra de los pasteles, French: Guerre des Pâtisseries), also known as the First French intervention in Mexico or the First Franco-Mexican
Board of Trade (1,895 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Board of Trade is a British government department concerned with commerce and industry, currently within the Department for International Trade. Its
Tirah campaign (1,199 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tirah Campaign, often referred to in contemporary British accounts as the Tirah Expedition, was an Indian frontier campaign in 1897–1898. Tirah is
Rotten and pocket boroughs (3,001 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A rotten or pocket borough, also known as a nomination borough or proprietorial borough, was a parliamentary borough or constituency in England, Great
The Living World (232 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Living World is a long-running natural history radio programme, made by the BBC and broadcast on its Radio 4. The series was created at the BBC Natural
Matale rebellion (1,290 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Matale rebellion, also known as the Rebellion of 1848, took place in Ceylon against the British colonial government under Governor Lord Torrington
Continental System (2,060 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Continental System or Continental Blockade (French: Blocus continental) was the foreign policy of Napoleon I of France against the United Kingdom during
Irish Free State (4,576 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Irish Free State (Irish: Saorstát Éireann, pronounced [ˈsˠiːɾˠsˠt̪ˠaːt̪ˠ ˈeːɾʲən̪ˠ], English: /ˌsɛərstɑːt ˈɛərən/ SAIR-staht AIR-ən; 6 December 1922 –
Gladstone–MacDonald pact (326 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Gladstone–MacDonald pact of 1903 was a secret informal electoral agreement negotiated by Herbert Gladstone, Liberal Party Chief Whip, and Ramsay MacDonald
Perak War (410 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Perak War (1875–76) took place between British and local forces in Perak, a state in northwestern Malaysia. The sultan of Upper Perak and other local
Panic of 1847 (594 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Panic of 1847 was a minor British banking crisis associated with the end of the 1840s railway industry boom and the failure of many non-banks. As a
Second Anglo-Burmese War (925 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Second Anglo-Burmese War or the Second Burma War (Burmese: ဒုတိယ အင်္ဂလိပ် မြန်မာ စစ် [dṵtḭja̰ ɪ́ɰ̃ɡəleɪʔ mjəmà sɪʔ]; 5 April 1852 – 20 January 1853)
Paulet affair (1843) (1,347 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Paulet affair was the five-month occupation of the Hawaiian Islands in 1843 by British naval officer Captain Lord George Paulet, of HMS Carysfort.
Bhutan War (936 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bhutan War (or Duar War) was a war fought between British India and Bhutan in 1864–1865. Britain sent a peace mission to Bhutan in early 1864, in the
Anglo–Egyptian War (2,442 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The British Conquest of Egypt (1882), also known as Anglo–Egyptian War (Arabic: الاحتلال البريطاني لمصر‎ al-iḥtilāl al-Brīṭānī li-Miṣr), occurred in 1882
Operation Jungle (1,400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Operation Jungle was a program by the British Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) early in the Cold War (1948–1955) for the clandestine insertion of intelligence
Clive Barracks bombing (662 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Clive Barracks bombing was a bomb attack carried out by the Provisional Irish Republican Army on 20 February 1989 on a British Army barracks called
Reform Act (430 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In the United Kingdom, Reform Act is legislation concerning electoral matters. It is most commonly used for laws passed in the 19th century and early 20th
Inglis Barracks bombing (397 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Inglis Barracks bombing was a bomb attack carried out by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) on 1 August 1988 on a British Army barracks called
Peterloo Massacre (9,463 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Peterloo Massacre took place at St Peter's Field, Manchester, Lancashire, England, on Monday 16 August 1819. On this day, cavalry charged into a crowd
Guildford pub bombings (992 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Guildford pub bombings occurred on 5 October 1974 when a subgroup of the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) detonated two 6-pound gelignite bombs
Postcodes in the United Kingdom (6,381 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Postal codes used in the United Kingdom are known as postcodes (originally, postal codes). They are alphanumeric and were adopted nationally between 11
Women's Social and Political Union (2,726 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) was a women-only political movement and leading militant organisation campaigning for women's suffrage in
RAF High Wycombe (1,379 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
RAF High Wycombe is a Royal Air Force station, situated in the village of Walters Ash, near High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire, England. It houses Headquarters
Bank of England Museum (429 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bank of England Museum, located within the Bank of England in the City of London, is home to a collection of diverse artifacts detailing the history
Battle of Alexandria (770 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Alexandria or Battle of Canope, fought on 21 March 1801 between the French army under General Menou and the British expeditionary corps under
Blue plaque (4,863 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A blue plaque is a permanent sign installed in a public place in the United Kingdom and elsewhere to commemorate a link between that location and a famous
Purchase of commissions in the British Army (1,446 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The purchase of officer commissions in the British Army was the practice of paying money to be made an officer in the cavalry and infantry regiments of
Penny Black (1,900 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Penny Black was the world's first adhesive postage stamp used in a public postal system. It was first issued in the United Kingdom (referred to in
Anglo-Aro War (890 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Anglo-Aro War (1901–1902) was a conflict between the Aro Confederacy in present-day Eastern Nigeria, and the British Empire. The war began after increasing
Admiralty (3,494 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Admiralty, originally known as the Office of the Admiralty and Marine Affairs, was the government department responsible for the command of the Royal
Hunger Strike Medal (1,375 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Hunger Strike Medal was a silver medal awarded by the leadership of the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) to suffragette prisoners who had
Barings Bank (3,405 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Barings Bank was a British merchant bank based in London, and the world's second oldest merchant bank after Berenberg Bank, Baring's close collaborator
Commonwealth of Nations (12,411 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Commonwealth of Nations, generally known simply as the Commonwealth, is a political association of 54 member states, nearly all former territories
Basuto Gun War (505 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Gun War, also known as the Basuto War, was an 1880-1881 conflict in the British territory of Basutoland (present-day Lesotho) in Southern Africa, fought
Bermuda sloop (2,113 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bermuda sloop is an historical type of fore-and-aft rigged single-masted sailing vessel developed on the islands of Bermuda in the 17th century. Such
Deal barracks bombing (1,224 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Deal barracks bombing was an attack by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) on the Royal Marine Depot, Deal, England. It took place at 8:22
Municipal socialism (1,088 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Municipal socialism refers to various historical—and contemporary—movements to use local government to further socialist aims. "Municipal socialism" has
Post Office Packet Service (1,395 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Post Office Packet Service dates to Tudor times and ran until 1823, when the Admiralty assumed control of the service. Originally, the Post Office
1976 IMF crisis (518 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1976 IMF Crisis was a financial crisis in the United Kingdom in 1976 which forced James Callaghan's Labour Party government to borrow $3.9 billion
British post offices in Crete (345 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
British post offices in Crete provided the postal service in the territory of the island of Crete. Stamps inscribed in Greek were used in the British sphere
Sunderland Docks (279 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sunderland Docks is an area of Sunderland, Tyne and Wear, England. Home to the Port of Sunderland, the docks have access to the North Sea. Sunderland City
Lancaster House Treaties (1,039 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Lancaster House Treaties of 2010 are two treaties between the United Kingdom and France for defence and security cooperation. They were signed at 10
Consol (bond) (457 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Consols (originally short for consolidated annuities, but subsequently taken to mean consolidated stock) was a name given to certain government debt issues
Debatable Lands (899 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Debatable Lands, also known as debatable ground, batable ground or threip lands, lay between Scotland and England. It was formerly in question as to
Handfasting (2,791 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Handfasting is a traditional practice that, depending on the term's usage, may correspond to an unofficiated wedding (in which a couple marries without
Women's suffrage in the United Kingdom (5,715 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Women's suffrage in the United Kingdom was a movement to fight for women's right to vote. It finally succeeded through two laws in 1918 and 1928. It became
Air Navigation and Transport Act (3,387 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Air Navigation and Transport Act is an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom Parliament in 1920 which gave the British Empire the authority to control
Benin Expedition of 1897 (2,375 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Benin Massacre of 1897 was a punitive expedition by a United Kingdom force of 1,200 under Admiral Sir Harry Rawson in response to the ambush of a previous
British rule in Ireland (175 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
British rule in Ireland began with the Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland in the late 12th century. Most of Ireland seceded from Britain following the Anglo-Irish
1757 caretaker ministry (524 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Kingdom of Great Britain was governed by a caretaker government between April and June 1757, after the dismissal of William Pitt led to the end of
Nanking incident of 1927 (1,416 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Nanking Incident (Chinese: 南京事件; pinyin: Nánjīng Shìjiàn; Wade–Giles: Nan2-ching1 Shih4-chien4) occurred in March 1927 during the capture of Nanjing
Railway Mania (1,618 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Railway Mania was an instance of a stock market bubble in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in the 1840s. It followed a common pattern: as
Allied intervention in the Russian Civil War (5,563 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Allied intervention in the Russian Civil War consisted of a series of multi-national military expeditions which began in 1918. The stated goals were to
Great Rebellion of 1817–18 (1,101 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Uwa Wellassa Great Rebellion of 1817–1818 ඌව වෙල්ලස්ස මහ කැරැල්ල , also known as the 1818 Uva–Wellassa uprising (after the two places it had started)
Ambela campaign (587 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Ambela campaign (also called Umbeyla; Umbeylah; Ambeyla) in 1863 was one of many expeditions in the border area between the Emirate of Afghanistan
Packet trade (1,209 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Generally, packet trade is any regularly scheduled cargo, passenger and mail trade conducted by ship. The ships are called "packet boats" as their original
Anglo-Burmese Wars (564 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
There have been three Burmese Wars or Anglo-Burmese Wars: First Anglo-Burmese War (1824 to 1826) Second Anglo-Burmese War (1852 to 1853) Third Anglo-Burmese
Chartism (5,716 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chartism was a working-class male suffrage movement for political reform in Britain that existed from 1838 to 1857. It took its name from the People's
British campaign in the Baltic (1918–19) (1,979 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The British campaign in the Baltic 1918–19 was a part of the Allied intervention in the Russian Civil War. The codename of the Royal Navy campaign was
Royal Society (6,829 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Royal Society, formally The Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, is a learned society and the United Kingdom's national academy
Tariff Reform League (602 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tariff Reform League (TRL) was a protectionist British pressure group formed in 1903 to protest against what they considered to be unfair foreign imports
Russo-Turkish War (1828–29) (2,161 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Russo-Turkish War of 1828–1829 was sparked by the Greek War of Independence of 1821–1829. War broke out after the Ottoman Sultan Mahmud II closed the
British philosophy (3,488 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
British philosophy refers to the philosophical tradition of the British people. "The native characteristics of British philosophy are these: common sense
Yeşilova incident (747 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Yeşilova incident (April 1991) refers to a reported armed stand off that took place at a refugee camp in Yeşilova (or Yasilova), a small Turkey town
Primrose League (1,739 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Primrose League was an organisation for spreading Conservative principles in Great Britain. It was founded in 1883. At a late point in its existence
Chief Mouser to the Cabinet Office (1,561 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Chief Mouser to the Cabinet Office is the title of the official resident cat of the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom at 10 Downing Street. There
Anglo-Zanzibar War (4,338 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Anglo-Zanzibar War was a military conflict fought between Great Britain and the Zanzibar Sultanate on 27 August 1896. The conflict lasted between 38
Brunei revolt (2,941 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Brunei revolt (Malay: Pemberontakan Brunei) was a December 1962 insurrection in the British protectorate of Brunei by opponents of its monarchy and
High Tory (839 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
High Toryism (sometimes referred to as conservative gentryism[by whom?]) is a term used in Britain, and elsewhere, to refer to old traditionalist conservatism
People's Budget (1,448 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1909/1910 People's Budget was a proposal of the Liberal government that introduced unprecedented taxes on the lands and incomes of Britain's wealthy
Military Service Act 1916 (396 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For the 1917 Canadian Act of a similar name, see Military Service Act (Canada). The Military Service Act 1916 was an Act passed by the Parliament of the
Operation Granby (1,264 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Operation GRANBY, commonly abbreviated Op GRANBY, was the code name given to the British military operations during the 1991 Gulf War. 53,462 members of
Gunboat War (3,870 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Gunboat War (Danish: Kanonbådskrigen, Norwegian: Kanonbåtkrigen; 1807–1814) was the naval conflict between Denmark–Norway and the British Navy during
Operation Granby (1,264 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Operation GRANBY, commonly abbreviated Op GRANBY, was the code name given to the British military operations during the 1991 Gulf War. 53,462 members of
Mahdist War (4,437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Mahdist War (Arabic: الثورة المهدية‎ ath-Thawra al-Mahdiyya; 1881–99) was a war of the late 19th century between the Mahdist Sudanese of the religious
Three-drum boiler (4,809 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Three-drum boilers are a class of water-tube boiler used to generate steam, typically to power ships. They are compact and of high evaporative power, factors
Honi soit qui mal y pense (2,336 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Honi soit qui mal y pense (UK: [ɒnɪ ˌswɑː kiː mal iː ˈpɒ̃s] or US: [ˌoʊni ˌswɑ ki ˌmɑl i ˈpɑ̃s]) is a French maxim used as the motto of the British chivalric
United Kingdom Alliance (751 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The United Kingdom Alliance (UKA) was a temperance movement in the United Kingdom founded in 1853 in Manchester to work for the prohibition of the trade
Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (United Kingdom) (1,710 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) was a United Kingdom government department created by the Board of Agriculture Act 1889 (52 & 53
Witchcraft Act 1735 (1,236 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Witchcraft Act (9 Geo. 2 c. 5) was a law passed by the Parliament of the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1735 which made it a crime for a person to claim
Operation Trent (2,136 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Operation Trent was an operation by Special Air Service (SAS) elements of the British Army, the largest known post-WWII operation in SAS history. The operation
Margaret (2009 film) (380 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Margaret is a 2009 television film produced by Great Meadow Productions for the BBC. It was first broadcast on 26 February 2009 on BBC Two. It was made
Military of Bermuda (2,142 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
While Bermuda technically remains the responsibility of the government of the United Kingdom, rather than of the local Bermudian Government, the island
Kandyan Wars (2,691 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Kandyan Wars (or the Kandian Wars) refers generally to the period of warfare between the British colonial forces and the Kingdom of Kandy, on the island
Government of the United Kingdom's financial response to the COVID-19 pandemic (2,497 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Following the outbreak of the COVID-19 virus reaching Great Britain and a subsequent lockdown being announced by the government; a financial package designed
Capital punishment in the United Kingdom (9,335 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Capital punishment in the United Kingdom was used from ancient times until the second half of the 20th century. The last executions in the United Kingdom
Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (517 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 52°06′00″N 2°18′58″W / 52.100°N 2.316°W / 52.100; -2.316 The Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE) was a scientific research establishment
Exercise Tiger (2,999 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Exercise Tiger, or Operation Tiger, was one of a series of large-scale rehearsals for the D-Day invasion of Normandy, which took place in April 1944 on
England–Wales border (4,551 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The England–Wales border, sometimes referred to as the Wales–England border or the Anglo-Welsh border, is the border between England and Wales, two constituent
Mods and rockers (1,117 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mods and rockers were two conflicting British youth subcultures of the early/mid 1960s to early 1970s. Media coverage of mods and rockers fighting in 1964
English Wars (Scandinavia) (2,952 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The English Wars (Danish: Englandskrigene, Swedish: Englandskrigen) were a series of conflicts between the United Kingdom and Sweden with Denmark-Norway
Colchester Garrison (2,493 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Colchester Garrison is a major garrison located in Colchester in the county of Essex, Eastern England. It has been an important military base since the
Historiography of the Suffragettes (2,699 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Historiography of the Suffragette Campaign deals with the various ways Suffragettes are depicted, analysed and debated within historical accounts of
Naval Historical Branch (1,138 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Naval Historical Branch originally known as the Historical Section is the branch responsible for managing the Royal Navy's historical archives, it
Anglo-Ashanti wars (3,537 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Anglo-Ashanti Wars were a series of five 19th-century conflicts that took place between 1824 and 1900, between the Ashanti Empire—in the Akan interior
Haldane Reforms (2,689 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Haldane Reforms were a series of far-ranging reforms of the British Army made from 1906 to 1912, and named after the Secretary of State for War, Richard
Mohmand campaign of 1897–98 (985 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The First Mohmand campaign was a British military campaign against the Mohmands from 1897 to 1898. The Mohmands are a Pashtun tribe who inhabit the hilly
House of Lords Act 1999 (4,297 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The House of Lords Act 1999 (c. 34) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that was given Royal Assent on 11 November 1999. The Act reformed
List of Parliaments of the United Kingdom (167 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of Parliaments of the United Kingdom, tabulated with the elections to the House of Commons and the list of members of the House. The Parliaments
Coalbrookdale (2,205 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coalbrookdale is a village in the Ironbridge Gorge in Shropshire, England, containing a settlement of great significance in the history of iron ore smelting
King's German Legion (1,587 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The King's German Legion (KGL; German: Königlich Deutsche Legion) was a British Army unit of mostly expatriate German personnel during the period 1803–16
Disappearing gun (3,039 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A disappearing gun, a gun mounted on a disappearing carriage, is an obsolete type of artillery which enabled a gun to hide from direct fire and observation
Ministry of Aviation (228 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Ministry of Aviation was a department of the United Kingdom government established in 1959. Its responsibilities included the regulation of civil aviation
London Post Office Railway (2,101 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Post Office Railway, known as Mail Rail since 1987, is a 2 ft (610 mm) narrow gauge, driverless underground railway in London that was built by the
Third Anglo-Burmese War (2,608 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Third Anglo-Burmese War (Burmese: တတိယ အင်္ဂလိပ် – မြန်မာစစ်, Tatiy Aaingaliut–Myanmarhcait), also known as the Third Burma War, was a conflict that
Afridi Redshirt Rebellion, Indian North West Frontier 1930–1931 (313 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Afridi Redshirt Rebellion was a military campaign conducted by British and Indian armies against Afridi tribesmen in the North West Frontier region
RAF Fylingdales (1,691 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Royal Air Force Fylingdales or more simply RAF Fylingdales is a Royal Air Force station on Snod Hill in the North York Moors, England. Its motto is "Vigilamus"
National Government (1931) (963 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The National Government of August–October 1931, also known as the First National Government was the first of a series of national governments formed during
Commission of array (791 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A commission of array was a commission given by English sovereigns to officers or gentry in a given territory to muster and array the inhabitants and to
History of law enforcement in the United Kingdom (2,885 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of law enforcement in the United Kingdom charts the development of law enforcement in the United Kingdom. It spans the period from the Middle
Raid on Alexandria (1941) (1,233 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Raid on Alexandria was carried out on 19 December 1941 by Italian Navy divers of the Decima Flottiglia MAS, who attacked and disabled two Royal Navy
Irwell Valley (876 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Irwell Valley in North West England extends from the Forest of Rossendale through the cities of Salford and Manchester. The River Irwell runs through
The Few (1,235 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Few were the airmen of the Royal Air Force (RAF) and the aviators of the Fleet Air Arm, Royal Navy (RN) who fought the Battle of Britain in the Second
Crisis of 1772 (1,513 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The crisis of 1772, also known as the credit crisis of 1772 or the panic of 1772, was a peacetime financial crisis which originated in London and then
Chanak Crisis (1,706 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Chanak Crisis (Turkish: Çanakkale Krizi), also called the Chanak Affair and the Chanak Incident, was a war scare in September 1922 between the United
Third Anglo-Afghan War (6,716 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Third Anglo-Afghan War (Persian: جنگ سوم افغان-انگلیس‎; Pashto: د افغان-انگرېز درېمه جگړه‎), also known as the Third Afghan War, the British-Afghan
Chitral Expedition (2,216 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Chitral Expedition (Urdu:چترال فوجی مہم) was a military expedition in 1895 sent by the British authorities to relieve the fort at Chitral which was
Invasion of Java (1811) (2,636 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The invasion of Java in 1811 was a successful British amphibious operation against the Dutch East Indian island of Java that took place between August
Avonmouth Docks (2,232 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Avonmouth Docks are part of the Port of Bristol, in England. They are situated on the northern side of the mouth of the River Avon, opposite the Royal
Future of the British Army (Army 2020 Refine) (3,323 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Army 2020 Refine, formerly known as Future Army Structure (Next Steps) or FAS (Next Steps), is the name given to an ongoing restructuring of the British
British naval forces in the Falklands War (2,846 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of the naval forces from the United Kingdom that took part in the Falklands War. For a list of naval forces from Argentina, see Argentine
Lionel Crabb (3,398 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lieutenant-Commander Lionel Kenneth Phillip Crabb, OBE, GM (28 January 1909 – presumed dead 19 April 1956), known as Buster Crabb, was a Royal Navy frogman
National Government (1935–1937) (247 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The National Government of 1935–1937 was formed by Stanley Baldwin on his reappointment as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom by King George V, following
Iraqi revolt of 1920 (4,492 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Iraqi revolt against the British, also known as the 1920 Iraqi Revolt or Great Iraqi Revolution, started in Baghdad in the summer of 1920 with mass
Department of Miscellaneous Weapons Development (915 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Department of Miscellaneous Weapons Development (DMWD), also known as the Directorate of Miscellaneous Weapon Development and colloquially known as
First Anglo-Burmese War (3,742 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The First Anglo-Burmese War, also known as the First Burma War, (Burmese: ပထမ အင်္ဂလိပ် မြန်မာ စစ်; [pətʰəma̰ ɪ́ɰ̃ɡəleiʔ mjəmà sɪʔ]; 5 March 1824 – 24
Vice-Admiral of the United Kingdom (1,368 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Vice-Admiral of the United Kingdom is an honorary office generally held by a senior Royal Navy admiral. He is the official deputy to the Lord High
Diamond Jubilee Armed Forces Parade and Muster (1,259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Diamond Jubilee Armed Forces Parade and Muster was a military parade held at Windsor Castle and Home Park in Windsor, Berkshire, England, organised
British Military Administration (Malaya) (3,428 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The British Military Administration (BMA) was the interim administrator of British Malaya from August 1945, the end of World War II, to the establishment
Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (283 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (BERR) was a United Kingdom government department. The department was created on 28 June
Anti-Corn Law League (2,150 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Anti-Corn Law League was a successful political movement in Great Britain aimed at the abolition of the unpopular Corn Laws, which protected landowners’
British contribution to the Manhattan Project (8,943 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Britain contributed to the Manhattan Project by helping initiate the effort to build the first atomic bombs in the United States during World War II, and
Architecture of the United Kingdom (3,978 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The architecture of the United Kingdom, or British architecture, consists of an eclectic combination of architectural styles, ranging from those that predate
Siege of Alexandria (840 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Siege of Alexandria was fought between 17 August and 2 September 1801, during the French Revolutionary Wars, between French and British forces and
Strategic Defence and Security Review 2010 (1,660 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Strategic Defence and Security Review 2010 was announced by the newly formed Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government of the United Kingdom
British Telecom microwave network (1,333 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The British Telecom microwave network was a network of point-to-point microwave radio links in the United Kingdom, operated at first by the General Post
National Government (1931–1935) (757 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The National Government of 1931–1935 was formed by Ramsay MacDonald following his reappointment as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom by King George
Big Brother (British TV series) (8,218 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Big Brother is the British version of the international reality television franchise Big Brother created by producer John de Mol in 1997. Originally broadcast
Admiralty Naval Aircraft Materials Laboratory (230 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Admiralty Naval Aircraft Materials Laboratory was a research department of the British Royal Navy responsible for dealing with metallurgical and chemical
Constitutional status of Cornwall (7,654 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cornwall is an administrative county of England. In ethnic and cultural terms, until around 1500, Cornwall and its inhabitants were regarded as a separate
History of journalism in the United Kingdom (6,366 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of journalism in the United Kingdom includes the gathering and transmitting of news, spans the growth of technology and trade, marked by the
Two penny blue (424 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Two Penny Blue or The Two Pence Blue was the world's second official postage stamp,[inconsistent] produced in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and
Transatlantic flight of Alcock and Brown (3,342 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
. Relocated to Clifden, Connemara, County Galway, Ireland to celebrate centenary in 2019. British aviators John Alcock and Arthur Brown made the first
Torpedo Alley (1,991 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Torpedo Alley, or Torpedo Junction, off North Carolina, is one of the graveyards of the Atlantic Ocean, named for the high number of attacks on Allied
A Midsummer Night's Dream (2016 film) (389 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
A Midsummer Night's Dream is a 2016 British television film based on the William Shakespeare play A Midsummer Night's Dream. It was adapted by Russell
Mohmand campaign of 1935 (679 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Second Mohmand campaign of 1935 was a British military campaign against the Mohmand tribes in the Northwest Frontier area of British India, now Pakistan
Second Matabele War (4,538 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Second Matabele War, also known as the Matabeleland Rebellion or part of what is now known in Zimbabwe as the First Chimurenga, was fought between
MAUD Committee (6,849 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The MAUD Committee was a British scientific working group formed during the Second World War. It was established to perform the research required to determine
Tube Alloys (9,561 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tube Alloys was the code name of the research and development programme authorised by the United Kingdom, with participation from Canada, to develop nuclear
British comics (5,922 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A British comic is a periodical published in the United Kingdom that contains comic strips. It is generally referred to as a comic or a comic magazine
Great Smog of London (2,181 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Smog is thought to be the worst air-pollution event in the history of the United Kingdom, and the most significant in terms of its effect on environmental
Anglo-Persian War (2,855 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Anglo–Persian War (Persian: جنگ ایران و انگلستان) lasted between November 1, 1856, and April 4, 1857, and was fought between Great Britain and Iran
Gavelkind (902 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gavelkind (/ˈɡævəlkaɪnd/) was a system of land tenure associated chiefly with the county of Kent, but also found in Ireland and Wales and some other parts
Strategic Defence Review (1,186 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Strategic Defence Review (SDR) was a British policy document produced in July 1998 by the Labour Government that had gained power a year previously
British invasions of the River Plate (3,845 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The British invasions of the River Plate were a series of unsuccessful British attempts to seize control of areas in the Spanish colonial Viceroyalty of
North Russia intervention (3,407 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The North Russia intervention, also known as the Northern Russian expedition, the Archangel campaign, and the Murman deployment, was part of the Allied
Signal Division (Royal Navy) (1,003 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Signal Division was a Directorate of the Admiralty Naval Staff responsible for policy, control and management of all naval communications from 1914
Delivering Security in a Changing World (1,087 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 2003 Defence White Paper, titled Delivering Security in a Changing World, set out the future structure of the British military, and was preceded by
Falklands War (16,633 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Falklands War (Spanish: Guerra de las Malvinas) was a 10-week undeclared war between Argentina and the United Kingdom in 1982 over two British dependent
History of the British canal system (6,101 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The British canal system of water transport played a vital role in the United Kingdom's Industrial Revolution at a time when roads were only just emerging
Wartime Broadcasting Service (1,832 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Wartime Broadcasting Service is a service of the BBC that is intended to broadcast in the United Kingdom either after a nuclear attack or if conventional
Rhodesia's Unilateral Declaration of Independence (16,759 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) was a statement adopted by the Cabinet of Rhodesia on 11 November 1965, announcing that Rhodesia, a British
Naval Ordnance Stores Department (718 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Naval Ordnance Stores Department, was a former department of the Admiralty responsible for the management of naval ordnance storage facilities and
Rhodesia's Unilateral Declaration of Independence (16,759 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) was a statement adopted by the Cabinet of Rhodesia on 11 November 1965, announcing that Rhodesia, a British
Orwell's list (2,093 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In 1949, shortly before he died, the English author George Orwell prepared a list of notable writers and other persons he considered to be unsuitable as
Maastricht Rebels (1,402 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Maastricht Rebels were British members of Parliament (MPs) belonging to the then governing Conservative Party who refused to support the government
Neoconservatism (11,892 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Neoconservatism is a political movement born in the United States during the 1960s among liberal hawks who became disenchanted with the increasingly pacifist
Unionist Club (352 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Unionist Club was a short-lived London gentlemen's club, now dissolved, which was established in 1886, and had wound up by 1892. For the last four
Churchill White Paper (3,506 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Churchill White Paper of 3 June 1922 (...sometimes referred to as "British Policy in Palestine". The official name of the document was Palestine -
British occupation of the Faroe Islands (1,757 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The British occupation of the Faroe Islands in World War II, also known as Operation Valentine, was implemented immediately following the German invasion
Bombardment of Kagoshima (1,887 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bombardment of Kagoshima, also known as the Anglo-Satsuma War (薩英戦争, Satsu-Ei Sensō), was a battle fought between Britain and the Satsuma Domain in
Panic of 1825 (3,527 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Panic of 1825 was a stock market crash that started in the Bank of England, arising in part out of speculative investments in Latin America, including
East of Suez (1,570 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
East of Suez is used in British military and political discussions in reference to interests beyond the European theatre, and east of the Suez Canal—most
Admiralty War Staff (1,303 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Admiralty War Staff was the former senior naval staff operational planning organisation within the British Admiralty that existed from 1912–17. It
British timber trade (2,092 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The British timber trade was importation of timber from the Baltic, and later North America, by the British. During the Middle Ages and Stuart period,
Options for Change (2,282 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Options for Change was a restructuring of the British Armed Forces in 1990 after the end of the Cold War. Until this point, UK military strategy had been
Women's suffrage in Wales (6,694 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Women's suffrage in Wales has historically been marginalised due to the prominence of societies and political groups in England which led the reform for
Thomas Sopwith (1,344 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Thomas Octave Murdoch Sopwith, CBE, Hon FRAeS (18 January 1888 – 27 January 1989) was an English aviation pioneer, business executive and yachtsman
Clerk of the Ordnance (305 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Clerk of the Ordnance was a subordinate of the Master-General of the Ordnance and a member of the Board of Ordnance from its constitution in 1597.
British Battalion (1,849 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The British Battalion (1936–1938) was the 16th battalion of the XV International Brigade, one of the mixed brigades of the International Brigades, during
Mass-Observation (1,766 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mass-Observation was a United Kingdom social research organisation founded in 1937. Their work ended in the mid-1960s but was revived in 1981. The archive
History of British animation (3,871 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of animation in the United Kingdom began at the very origins of the artform in the late 19th century. British animation has been strengthened
Blatcherism (402 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Blatcherism is a term formed as a portmanteau of the names of two British politicians, Tony Blair (Labour Party) and Margaret Thatcher (Conservative Party)
Penny Post (1,141 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Penny Post is any one of several postal systems in which normal letters could be sent for one penny. Five such schemes existed in the United Kingdom
Royal Commission on the Defence of the United Kingdom (2,125 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Royal Commission on the Defence of the United Kingdom was a committee formed in 1859 to enquire into the ability of the United Kingdom to defend itself
1910 London to Manchester air race (3,400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1910 London to Manchester air race took place between two aviators, each of whom attempted to win a heavier-than-air powered flight challenge between
Bengal Native Infantry (2,368 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The regiments of Bengal Native Infantry, alongside the regiments of Bengal European Infantry, were the regular infantry components of the East India Company's
Gwalior Campaign (481 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Gwalior Campaign was fought between British and Maratha forces in Gwalior in India, December 1843. The Maratha Empire controlled much of central and
Classical music of the United Kingdom (3,574 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Classical music of the United Kingdom is taken in this article to mean classical music in the sense elsewhere defined, of formally composed and written
Daily Mail aviation prizes (290 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Between 1906 and 1930, the Daily Mail newspaper, initially on the initiative of its proprietor, Alfred Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Northcliffe, awarded numerous
Reassertion of British sovereignty over the Falkland Islands (1833) (2,797 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
In December 1832, two naval vessels were sent by the United Kingdom to re-assert British sovereignty over the Falkland Islands (Spanish: Islas Malvinas)
Dehousing (2,074 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
On 30 March 1942 Professor Frederick Lindemann, Baron Cherwell, the British government's chief scientific adviser, sent to the British prime minister Winston
Royal Flying Corps (9,385 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was the air arm of the British Army before and during the First World War, until it merged with the Royal Naval Air Service
History of British newspapers (5,540 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of British newspapers dates to the 17th century with the emergence of regular publications covering news and gossip. The relaxation of government
War-time electoral pact (133 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The war-time electoral pact was an electoral pact established by the member parties of the UK coalition governments in the First World War, and re-established
List of American and British defectors in the Korean War (2,698 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This list names the twenty-two United Nations soldiers and POWs (one British and 21 Americans) who declined repatriation to the United Kingdom and United
Telecommunications Research Establishment (4,205 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 52°06′00″N 2°18′58″W / 52.100°N 2.316°W / 52.100; -2.316 The Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) was the main United Kingdom
Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant (3,638 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 51°30′20″N 0°04′32″W / 51.50556°N 0.07556°W / 51.50556; -0.07556 The Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant was a parade on 3 June 2012 of 670
The History of Parliament (2,938 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The History of Parliament is a project to write a complete history of the United Kingdom Parliament and its predecessors, the Parliament of Great Britain
South African Wars (1879–1915) (14,882 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Ethnic, political and social tensions among European colonial powers, indigenous Africans, and English and Dutch settlers led to open conflict in a series
Battle of the Beams (4,172 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of the Beams was a period early in the Second World War when bombers of the German Air Force (Luftwaffe) used a number of increasingly accurate
Rear-Admiral of the United Kingdom (1,145 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Rear-Admiral of the United Kingdom is a now honorary office generally held by a senior (possibly retired) Royal Navy admiral. Despite the title, the
Naval Ordnance Department (1,456 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Naval Ordnance Department, also known as the Department of the Director of Naval Ordnance, was a former department of the Admiralty responsible for
British Expedition to Abyssinia (5,348 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The British Expedition to Abyssinia was a rescue mission and punitive expedition carried out in 1868 by the armed forces of the British Empire against
Battle of Montevideo (1807) (1,087 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Battle of Montevideo was a battle between the British and Spanish Empires during the Napoleonic Wars, in which British forces captured the city of
Aroostook War (3,667 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Aroostook War (sometimes called the Pork and Beans War) was a military and civilian-involved confrontation in 1838–1839 between the United States and
British war crimes (9,133 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
British war crimes are acts by the armed forces of the United Kingdom which have violated the laws and customs of war since the Hague Conventions of 1899
List of Celebrity Big Brother (British TV series) housemates (1,678 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Celebrity Big Brother is a spin-off of the British reality television series Big Brother, broadcast in the UK and Ireland. Originally broadcast on Channel
List of Celebrity Big Brother (British TV series) housemates (1,678 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Celebrity Big Brother is a spin-off of the British reality television series Big Brother, broadcast in the UK and Ireland. Originally broadcast on Channel
Tizard Mission (1,968 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tizard Mission, officially the British Technical and Scientific Mission, was a British delegation that visited the United States during the Second
1966 Defence White Paper (854 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1966 Defence White Paper (Command Papers 2592 and 2901) was a major review of the United Kingdom's defence policy initiated by the Labour government
Timeline of LGBT history in the United Kingdom (13,374 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a timeline of notable events in the history of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community in the United Kingdom. 43  – Roman conquest
Stanhope Memorandum (165 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Stanhope Memorandum was a document written by Edward Stanhope, the Secretary of State for War of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, on
History of the socialist movement in the United Kingdom (7,237 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Socialism in the United Kingdom is thought to stretch back to the 19th century from roots arising in the aftermath of the English Civil War. Notions of
Siege of Cairo (1,831 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Siege of Cairo also known as the Cairo Campaign was a siege that took place during the French Revolutionary Wars, between French and British with Ottoman
UK miners' strike (1969) (1,625 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The UK miners' strike of 1969 was an unofficial strike that involved 140 of the 307 collieries owned by the National Coal Board, including all collieries
Quebec Agreement (7,933 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Quebec Agreement was a secret agreement between the United Kingdom and the United States outlining the terms for the coordinated development of the
New Zealand Wars (7,432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The New Zealand Wars were a series of armed conflicts that took place in New Zealand from 1845 to 1872 between the Colonial government and allied Māori
Le Paradis massacre (3,314 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 50°35′42″N 2°38′52″E / 50.59500°N 2.64778°E / 50.59500; 2.64778 The Le Paradis massacre was a war crime committed by members of the 14th
1957 Defence White Paper (3,248 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1957 White Paper on Defence (Cmnd. 124) was a British white paper setting forth the perceived future of the British military. It had profound effects
Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (966 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (ACA) was a UK agency founded on 30 April 1909, to undertake, promote, and institutionalize aeronautical research
Defence Regulation 18B (2,340 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Defence Regulation 18B, often referred to as simply 18B, was one of the Defence Regulations used by the British Government during the Second World War
Siege of Arrah (4,436 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Siege of Arrah (27 July – 3 August 1857) took place during the Indian Mutiny (also known as the Indian Rebellion of 1857). It was the eight-day defence
Montreal Laboratory (4,838 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Montreal Laboratory in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, was established by the National Research Council of Canada during World War II to undertake nuclear
Miles M.26 (709 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Miles M.26 was the designation used to cover the family of X-series design proposals, for long-range transport aircraft. The common factors of most X design
Childers Reforms (1,500 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Childers Reforms of 1881 reorganised the infantry regiments of the British Army. The reforms were done by Secretary of State for War Hugh Childers
First Anglo-Afghan War (10,455 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The First Anglo-Afghan War (Pashto: د افغان-انگرېز لومړۍ جگړه‎, also known by the British as the Disaster in Afghanistan) was fought between the British
History of fire brigades in the United Kingdom (1,666 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of fire brigades in the United Kingdom charts the development of Fire services in the United Kingdom from the creation of the United Kingdom
Society for Nautical Research (915 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Society for Nautical Research was founded in 1910 by Charles Napier Robinson to promote the academic field of maritime history in the United Kingdom
The Long Walk to Finchley (1,577 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret Thatcher: The Long Walk to Finchley, subtitled in the initial credits How Maggie Might Have Done It, is a 2008 BBC Four television drama based
Lieutenant of the Admiralty (548 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Lieutenant of the Admiralty is a now honorary office generally held by a senior retired Royal Navy admiral. He is the official deputy to the Lord High
Royal Radar Establishment (3,666 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Royal Radar Establishment was a research center in Malvern, Worcestershire in the United Kingdom. It was formed in 1953 as the Radar Research Establishment
British Military Administration (Libya) (601 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The British Military Administration of Libya was the control of the regions of Cyrenaica and Tripolitania of the former Italian Libya by the British from
Anthony Roll (4,240 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Anthony Roll is a paper record of ships of the English Tudor navy of the 1540s, named after its creator, Anthony Anthony. It originally consisted of
Multinational Force in Lebanon (5,483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Multinational Force in Lebanon (MNF) was an international peacekeeping force created in August 1982 following an 1981 U.S.-brokered ceasefire between
Anglo-French blockade of the Río de la Plata (5,305 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Anglo-French blockade of the Río de la Plata was a five-year-long naval blockade imposed by France and Britain on the Argentine Confederation ruled
Gaiety Girls (914 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gaiety Girls were the chorus girls in Edwardian musical comedies, beginning in the 1890s at the Gaiety Theatre, London, in the shows produced by George
Great Recoinage of 1816 (824 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Great Recoinage of 1816 was an attempt by the British Government to re-stabilise the currency of Great Britain following economic difficulties precipitated
Combination Act 1799 (188 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Combination Act 1799 (39 Geo. III, c. 81) titled An Act to prevent Unlawful Combinations of Workmen, prohibited trade unions and collective bargaining
Operations Division (Royal Navy) (1,606 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Operations Division was a former Directorate of the Admiralty Naval Staff responsible for the creation and implementation of long-term policy in regards
Temperance movement in the United Kingdom (1,263 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Temperance movement in the United Kingdom originated as a mass movement in the 19th century. Before this, though there were diatribes published against
Television in the United Kingdom (8,355 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Television in the United Kingdom started in 1936 as a public service which was free of advertising. Currently, the United Kingdom has a collection of free-to-air
Bombardment of Alexandria (2,038 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bombardment of Alexandria in Egypt by the British Mediterranean Fleet took place on 11–13 July 1882. Admiral Beauchamp Seymour was in command of a
GEC-Marconi scientist deaths conspiracy theory (429 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The GEC-Marconi scientist deaths conspiracy theory claims that between 1982 and 1990 twenty-five[dubious – discuss] British-based GEC-Marconi scientists
British expedition to Tibet (7,303 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The British expedition to Tibet, also known as the British invasion of Tibet or the Younghusband expedition to Tibet began in December 1903 and lasted
Windmill Theatre (2,719 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Windmill Theatre — now The Windmill International — in Great Windmill Street, London was for many years both a variety and revue theatre. The Windmill
The Great Game (9,979 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"The Great Game" was a political and diplomatic confrontation that existed for most of the 19th century between Great Britain and Russia over Afghanistan
Indian Rebellion of 1857 (21,605 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Indian Rebellion of 1857 was a major, but ultimately unsuccessful, uprising in India in 1857–58 against the rule of the British East India Company
Uniform Penny Post (990 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Uniform Penny Post was a component of the comprehensive reform of the Royal Mail, the UK's official postal service, that took place in the 19th century
Indian Rebellion of 1857 (21,605 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Indian Rebellion of 1857 was a major, but ultimately unsuccessful, uprising in India in 1857–58 against the rule of the British East India Company
Maritime history of the Channel Islands (4,989 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Channel Islands comprise a group of islands off the coast of France. The largest island is Jersey, followed by Guernsey, Alderney, Sark, and a number
Allied Intelligence Bureau (473 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Allied Intelligence Bureau (AIB) was a joint United States, Australian, Dutch and British intelligence and special operations agency during World War
Somaliland campaign (1920) (1,289 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The fifth expedition of the Somaliland campaign in 1920 was the final British expedition against the Dervish forces of Mohammed Abdullah Hassan (often
Anglo-Nepalese War (9,025 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Anglo-Nepalese War (1 November 1814 – 4 March 1816), also known as the Gurkha War, was fought between the Kingdom of Gorkha (present-day Federal Democratic
Alexandria expedition of 1807 (3,985 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Alexandria expedition of 1807 or Fraser expedition (Arabic: حملة فريزر‎) was an operation by the Royal Navy and the British Army during the Anglo-Turkish
New Labour, New Life for Britain (473 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
New Labour, New Life for Britain was a political manifesto published in 1996 by the British Labour Party. The party had recently rebranded itself as New
Later life of Winston Churchill (3,988 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Winston Churchill's Conservative Party lost the July 1945 general election, forcing him to step down as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. For six years
Raid on Limbang (733 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Raid on Limbang (Malay: Serangan/Serbuan di Limbang) was a military engagement between British Royal Marine commandos and insurgents of the North Kalimantan
Scarborough Maritime Heritage Centre (538 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Scarborough Maritime Heritage Centre (SMHC), is a museum situated in Scarborough, North Yorkshire, England, and opened on 12 December 2009. The centre
Plan R 4 (849 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Plan R 4 was an unrealised British plan to invade Norway and Sweden in April 1940, during the Second World War. As a result of competing plans for Norway
Four-minute warning (2,235 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The four-minute warning was a public alert system conceived by the British Government during the Cold War and operated between 1953 and 1992. The name
Dowlais Ironworks (1,593 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Dowlais Ironworks was a major ironworks and steelworks located at Dowlais near Merthyr Tydfil, in Wales. Founded in the 18th century, it operated until
Samoan crisis (842 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Samoan Crisis was a standoff between the United States, Germany, and Great Britain from 1887–1889 over control of the Samoan Islands during the Samoan
Momma Don't Allow (94 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Momma Don't Allow is a short British documentary film of 1956 about a show of the Chris Barber band with Ottilie Patterson in a north London trad jazz
Seven Wonders of the Industrial World (1,036 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Seven Wonders of the Industrial World is a 7-part British docudrama television miniseries that originally aired from 4 September 2003 (2003-09-04) to
British ground forces in the Falklands War (1,208 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of British ground forces in the Falklands War. For a list of ground forces from Argentina, see Argentine ground forces in the Falklands
Invergordon Mutiny (2,080 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Invergordon Mutiny was an industrial action[citation needed] by around 1,000 sailors in the British Atlantic Fleet that took place on 15–16 September
Night Mail (5,459 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Night Mail is a 1936 English documentary film directed and produced by Harry Watt and Basil Wright, and produced by the General Post Office (GPO) film
Board of Ordnance (6,726 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Board of Ordnance was a British government body. Established in the Tudor period, it had its headquarters in the Tower of London. Its primary responsibilities
Unreformed House of Commons (5,744 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Unreformed House of Commons" is a name given to the House of Commons of Great Britain and (after 1800) the House of Commons of the United Kingdom before
Military history of the North-West Frontier (6,811 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The North-West Frontier (present-day Khyber Pakhtunkhwa) was a region of the British Indian Empire. It remains the western frontier of present-day Pakistan
Ministry of Defence Main Building (United Kingdom) (3,310 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Ministry of Defence Main Building or MOD Main Building, also known as MOD Whitehall or originally as the Whitehall Gardens Building, is a grade I listed
Naval Defence Act 1889 (876 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Naval Defence Act 1889 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It received the Royal Assent on 31 May 1889 and formally adopted "two-power
The Souls (577 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Souls were a small, loosely-knit but distinctive social group in the United Kingdom, from 1885 to the turn of the century. If their children are included
History of the Green Party of England and Wales (1,040 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Green Party of England and Wales has its roots in the PEOPLE Party started in Coventry in 1972/3 by four professional friends (Michael Benfield, Freda
1999 Scottish Parliament election (564 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
became the first ever elected Green parliamentarian in the history of the United Kingdom. Dennis Canavan, who had failed to become an approved Labour
Operation Claret (2,697 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Claret was the code name given to operations conducted from about July 1964 until July 1966 from East Malaysia (Sarawak and Sabah) across the border in
National Service (Armed Forces) Act 1939 (279 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The National Service (Armed Forces) Act 1939 was enacted by the Parliament of the United Kingdom on 3 September 1939, the day the United Kingdom declared
Harold Wilson conspiracy theories (2,139 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Since the mid-1970s, a variety of conspiracy theories have emerged regarding British Labour Prime Minister Harold Wilson, who served as the Prime Minister
Protect and Survive (2,821 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Protect and Survive is a public information series on civil defence produced by the British government during the late 1970s and early 1980s. It is intended
Battle of Mahé (2,960 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Mahé was a minor naval engagement of the last year of the French Revolutionary Wars, fought on 19 August 1801 in the harbour of Mahé in the
MacRobertson Air Race (813 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
RAF Mildenhall Baghdad Allahabad Singapore Darwin Charleville Melbourne The MacRobertson Trophy Air Race (also known as the London to Melbourne Air Race)
Argentine air forces in the Falklands War (4,314 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article describes the composition and actions of the Argentine air forces in the Falklands War (Spanish: Guerra de las Malvinas), which comprised
Operation Hurricane (7,040 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Operation Hurricane was the first test of a British atomic device. A plutonium implosion device was detonated on 3 October 1952 in the lagoon in the Monte
National Enterprise Board (855 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The National Enterprise Board (NEB) was a United Kingdom government body. It was set up in 1975 by the Labour government of Harold Wilson, to support the
Vice-county (1,253 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A vice-county (vice county or biological vice-county) is a geographical division of the British Isles used for the purposes of biological recording and
Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (1,835 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST) is the international membership body and learned society for marine professionals
Hales rifle grenade (883 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Hales rifle grenade is the name for several rifle grenades used by British forces during World War I. All of these are based on the No. 3 design. To
Cholmondeley Castle (2,700 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cholmondeley Castle (/ˈtʃʌmlɪ/ CHUM-lee) is a country house in the civil parish of Cholmondeley, Cheshire, England. Together with its adjacent formal gardens
Civil Defence Corps (1,184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Civil Defence Corps (CDC) was a civilian volunteer organisation established in Great Britain in 1949 to mobilise and take local control of the affected
Demographic history of Scotland (4,938 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The demographic history of Scotland includes all aspects of population history in what is now Scotland. Scotland may have been first occupied in the last
Stothert & Pitt (1,771 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Stothert & Pitt was a British engineering company founded in 1855 in Bath, England. It was the builder of various engineering products ranging from Dock
Civil Defence Corps (1,184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Civil Defence Corps (CDC) was a civilian volunteer organisation established in Great Britain in 1949 to mobilise and take local control of the affected
RAF Fauld explosion (1,108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The RAF Fauld explosion was a military accident which occurred at 11:11 am on Monday, 27 November 1944 at the RAF Fauld underground munitions storage depot
Operation Barras (6,450 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Operation Barras was a British Army operation that took place in Sierra Leone on 10 September 2000, during the late stages of that nation's civil war.
Frisch–Peierls memorandum (3,877 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Frisch–Peierls memorandum was the first technical exposition of a practical nuclear weapon. It was written by expatriate German physicists Otto Frisch
Maynooth Grant (884 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Maynooth Grant was a cash grant from the British government to a Catholic seminary in Ireland. In 1845, the Conservative Prime Minister, Sir Robert
National Economic Development Council (366 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The National Economic Development Council (NEDC) was an economic planning forum set up in 1962 in the United Kingdom to bring together management, trades
Die hard (phrase) (519 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Die hard is a phrase coined by Lieutenant-Colonel William Inglis of the 57th (West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot during the Battle of Albuera (Description
North–South divide in the United Kingdom (1,107 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In Great Britain, the term North–South divide refers to the economic and cultural differences between Southern England and the rest of Great Britain (Northern
Clerk of the Deliveries of the Ordnance (290 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Clerk of the Deliveries of the Ordnance was a subordinate of the Master-General of the Ordnance and a member of the Board of Ordnance from its constitution
British Legions (1,896 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The British Legion (Spanish: legión británica) or British Legions were foreign volunteer units that fought under Simón Bolívar against Spain for the independence
United Kingdom Warning and Monitoring Organisation (2,045 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The United Kingdom Warning and Monitoring Organisation (UKWMO) was a British civilian organisation operating to provide UK military and civilian authorities
Liberal welfare reforms (6,285 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Liberal welfare reforms (1906–1914) were a series of acts of social legislation passed by the Liberal Party after the 1906 general election. They represent
U.S.–British Staff Conference (ABC–1) (483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The U.S.–British Staff Conference was a series of secret discussions between United States and British military staff members on American, British, and
Geddes Axe (906 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Geddes Axe was the drive for public economy and retrenchment in UK government expenditure recommended in the 1920s by a Committee on National Expenditure
2011 British privacy injunctions controversy (3,715 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The British privacy injunctions controversy began in early 2011, when London-based tabloid newspapers published stories about anonymous celebrities that
Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015 (2,268 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The National Security Strategy and Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015 was published by the British government on 23 November 2015 to outline the
Text publication society (3,792 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A text publication society is a learned society which publishes (either as its sole function, or as a principal function) scholarly editions of old works
Silvertown explosion (1,777 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Silvertown explosion occurred in Silvertown in West Ham, Essex (now part of the London Borough of Newham, in Greater London) on Friday, 19 January
Upper ten thousand (379 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Upper Ten Thousand, or simply, The Upper Ten, is a 19th-century phrase referring to wealthiest 10,000 residents of New York City. The phrase was coined
1981 Defence White Paper (735 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1981 Defence White Paper (titled "The UK Defence Programme: The Way Forward" Cmnd 8288) was a major review of the United Kingdom's defence policy brought
Census Enumerators' Books (423 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
During the decennial England and Wales Censuses of 1841 to 1901, the individual schedules returned from each household were transcribed and collated by
Polaris Sales Agreement (3,821 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Polaris Sales Agreement was a treaty between the United States and the United Kingdom which began the UK Polaris programme. The agreement was signed
Argentine naval forces in the Falklands War (2,178 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article describes the composition and actions of the Argentine naval forces in the Falklands War. For a list of naval forces from the United Kingdom
Genius of Britain (96 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Genius of Britain: The Scientists Who Changed the World is a five-part television documentary presented by leading British scientific figures, which charts
King George's Fields (2,744 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A King George's Field is a public open space in the United Kingdom dedicated to the memory of King George V (3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936). In 1936, after
Renaissance in Scotland (9,755 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Renaissance in Scotland was a cultural, intellectual and artistic movement in Scotland, from the late fifteenth century to the beginning of the seventeenth
Quintinshill rail disaster (7,113 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Quintinshill rail disaster was a multi-train rail crash which occurred on 22 May 1915 outside the Quintinshill signal box near Gretna Green in Dumfriesshire
Ecclesiastical History Society (566 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Ecclesiastical History Society (EHS) is a learned historical society founded in 1961 to foster interest in, and to advance the study of, all areas
London Pneumatic Despatch Company (1,391 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The London Pneumatic Despatch Company (also known as the London Pneumatic Dispatch Company) was formed on 30 June 1859, to design, build and operate an
In Place of Strife (284 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
   This article related to the history of the United Kingdom or its predecessor states is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. v t e
Public Libraries Act 1850 (2,250 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Public Libraries Act 1850 (13 & 14 Vict c.65) was an Act of the United Kingdom Parliament which first gave local boroughs the power to establish free
List of I'm a Celebrity...Get Me Out of Here! (British TV series) contestants (261 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
I'm a Celebrity...Get Me Out of Here! is a British reality television show in which celebrity contestants live together in a jungle environment for a few
British submarine flotilla in the Baltic (1,031 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A British submarine flotilla operated in the Baltic Sea for three years during the First World War. The squadron of nine submarines was attached to the
V bomber (10,549 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The "V bombers" were the Royal Air Force (RAF) aircraft during the 1950s and 1960s that comprised the United Kingdom's strategic nuclear strike force known
1958 US–UK Mutual Defence Agreement (6,549 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1958 US–UK Mutual Defense Agreement, or UK–US Mutual Defence Agreement, is a bilateral treaty between the United States and the United Kingdom on nuclear
Bubble Act (574 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bubble Act 1720 (also Royal Exchange and London Assurance Corporation Act 1719) was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain passed on 11 June 1720 that
The bomber will always get through (2,161 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"The bomber will always get through" was a phrase used by Stanley Baldwin in a 1932 speech "A Fear for the Future" given to the British Parliament. His
Trafford Centre (4,781 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
planning process was one of the longest and most expensive in the history of the United Kingdom; concerns surrounded the effect the shopping centre might have
S-Plan (6,666 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The S-Plan or Sabotage Campaign or England Campaign was a campaign of bombing and sabotage against the civil, economic, and military infrastructure of
Metric Martyrs (1,562 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Metric Martyrs were a British advocacy group who campaigned for the freedom to choose what units of measurement are used by traders. The group believed
A History of Britain (TV series) (907 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
A History of Britain is a BBC documentary series written and presented by Simon Schama, first transmitted in the United Kingdom from 30 September 2000
British Auxiliary Legion (1,658 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The British Auxiliary Legion, also called the British Legion (La Legión Británica) or Westminster Legion, existed from 1835 to 1837. It was a British military
Paika Rebellion (1,539 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Paika Rebellion, also called the Paika Bidroha. It was an armed rebellion against the British East India Company's rule in the then Bihar and Orissa
Court of piepowders (768 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A court of piepowders was a special tribunal in England organized by a borough on the occasion of a fair or market. These courts had unlimited jurisdiction
Lower Swansea valley (1,146 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Lower Swansea valley (Welsh: Cwm Tawe Isaf) is the lower half of the valley of the River Tawe in south Wales. It runs from approximately the level
Siege of Fort Julien (720 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Siege of Fort Julien was a military engagement that took place during the French Revolutionary Wars as part of the French campaign in Egypt and Syria
1936–1939 Arab revolt in Palestine (13,846 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1936–1939 Arab revolt in Palestine, later came to be known as "The Great Revolt", was a nationalist uprising by Palestinian Arabs in Mandatory Palestine
Derby Scheme (489 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Derby Scheme was introduced during World War I in Britain in the autumn of 1915 by Herbert Kitchener's new Director General of Recruiting, Edward Stanley
Project E (5,468 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Project E was a joint project between the United States and the United Kingdom during the Cold War to provide nuclear weapons to the Royal Air Force (RAF)
Anglo-German Naval Agreement (7,705 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Anglo-German Naval Agreement (AGNA) of 18 June 1935 was a naval agreement between the United Kingdom and Germany regulating the size of the Kriegsmarine
King's shilling (1,365 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The King's shilling, sometimes called the Queen's shilling when the Sovereign is female, is a historical slang term referring to the earnest payment of
Every Day Except Christmas (950 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Every Day Except Christmas is a 37-minute documentary film filmed in 1957 at the Covent Garden fruit, vegetable and flower market, then located in the
2019–2020 Persian Gulf crisis (18,885 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 2019–2020 Persian Gulf crisis, also known as the Crisis in the Gulf and the Iranian–American confrontation is an intensification of military tensions
1912 British Military Aeroplane Competition (1,154 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In 1911 the British War Office announced their first Military Aeroplane Competition for aircraft to meet the requirements of the newly formed Royal Flying
Sinking of Chian-der 3 (396 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 51°30′S 64°42′W / 51.50°S 64.70°W / -51.50; -64.70 (Sinking Chian-der 3) The sinking of Chian-der 3 was an incident that occurred on 28
Gas Light and Coke Company (4,942 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Gas Light and Coke Company (also known as the Westminster Gas Light and Coke Company, and the Chartered Gas Light and Coke Company), was a company
History of British nationality law (8,023 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article concerns the history of British nationality law. British nationality law has its origins in medieval England. There has always been a distinction
USS James Madison (SSBN-627) (526 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
USS James Madison (SSBN-627), the lead ship of her class of ballistic missile submarine, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for
Royal fish (552 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Under the law of the United Kingdom, whales and sturgeons are royal fish, and when taken become the personal property of the monarch of the United Kingdom
Ed Yost (1,256 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paul Edward Yost (June 30, 1919 – May 27, 2007) was the American inventor of the modern hot air balloon and is referred to as the "Father of the Modern
Partnerships UK (385 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Partnerships UK plc (PUK) was an centralized unit responsible for furthering public-private partnerships in the United Kingdom. It was a public limited
Oram's Arbour (125 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
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People's Quantitative Easing (1,063 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
People's Quantitative Easing (PQE) is a policy proposed by Jeremy Corbyn during the 2015 Labour leadership election in August. It would require the Bank
Political Economy Club (760 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Political Economy Club was founded by James Mill and a circle of friends in 1821 in London, for the purpose of coming to an agreement on the fundamental
Trident (UK nuclear programme) (12,527 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Trident, also known as the Trident nuclear programme or Trident nuclear deterrent, covers the development, procurement and operation of nuclear weapons
Committee for the Scientific Survey of Air Defence (271 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
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Faggot voter (628 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A faggot voter or faggot was a person who qualified to vote in an election with a restricted suffrage only by the exploitation of loopholes in the regulations
Women's Emergency Corps (111 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Women's Emergency Corps was a service organisation founded in 1914 by Evelina Haverfield, Decima Moore, and the Women's Social and Political Union
Celtic law (6,569 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A number of law codes have in the past been in use in the various Celtic nations since the Middle Ages. While these vary considerably in details, there
National Service Act 1948 (857 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The National Service Act 1948 was an Act of Parliament which extended the British conscription of the Second World War long after the war-time need for
HANDEL (252 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
HANDEL was the code-name for the UK's national attack warning system in the Cold War. It consisted of a small console with two microphones, lights and
History of the Conservative Party (UK) (9,024 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Conservative Party (also known as Tories) is the oldest political party in the United Kingdom and arguably the world. The current party was first organised
British military intervention in the Sierra Leone Civil War (8,338 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The United Kingdom began a military intervention in Sierra Leone on 7 May 2000 under the codename Operation Palliser. Although small numbers of British
Airborne Forces Experimental Establishment (665 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Airborne Forces Experimental Establishment (AFEE) was a branch of the British Air Ministry, that researched and developed non-traditional airborne
List of commemorative plaques in Merseyside (222 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Commemorative plaques in Merseyside, England, can be found across the region, highlighting notable people, buildings or historic sites. Many of the plaques
Monetary reform in Britain (520 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Monetary reform is the process of fundamentally changing policies regarding money. It can include changes to the money creation process, fractional-reserve
British nuclear tests at Maralinga (14,259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
British nuclear tests at Maralinga were conducted between 1956 and 1963 at the Maralinga site, part of the Woomera Prohibited Area in South Australia about
We Are the Lambeth Boys (288 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
We Are the Lambeth Boys is a 1959 British documentary film directed by Karel Reisz. Filmed in the summer of 1958, it was sponsored by the Ford motor company
FV Gaul (1,720 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The fishing vessel Gaul was a deep sea factory ship based at Hull, United Kingdom. She was built in 1972 by Brooke Marine of Lowestoft for the Ranger Fishing
British hardened field defences of World War II (8,027 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
British hardened field defences of World War II were small fortified structures constructed as a part of British anti-invasion preparations. They were
Alleged British use of chemical weapons in Mesopotamia in 1920 (1,208 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
It has been alleged that the British used chemical weapons in Mesopotamia in 1920, during the Iraqi revolt (Ath Thawra al Iraqiyya al Kubra), in the period
Lord Lieutenant of Avon (64 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
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Front Line First (398 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Front Line First: The Defence Cost Study was a UK programme of defence cuts announced on 14 July 1994 by then Defence Secretary Malcolm Rifkind. Front
Liverpool docks strikes (260 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Throughout the history of the Liverpool docks, known as Mersey Docks and Harbour Company, there have been numerous strike actions by dock workers, although
Church League for Women's Suffrage (763 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Church League for Women's Suffrage (CLWS) was an organisation campaigning for women's suffrage in the United Kingdom. The league was started in London
Battle of Khushab (223 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Khushab (Battle of Khoosh-Ab) took place on 7 February 1857 and was the largest single engagement of the Anglo-Persian War. Having taken
Alleged British use of chemical weapons in Mesopotamia in 1920 (1,208 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
It has been alleged that the British used chemical weapons in Mesopotamia in 1920, during the Iraqi revolt (Ath Thawra al Iraqiyya al Kubra), in the period
History of ITV (8,836 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of ITV, the United Kingdom "Independent Television" commercial network, goes back to 1955. Independent Television began as a network of independently-owned
Monetary reform in Britain (520 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Monetary reform is the process of fundamentally changing policies regarding money. It can include changes to the money creation process, fractional-reserve
Living prime ministers of the United Kingdom (1,357 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a chronological list of all those who served as British prime minister and were still living at different periods in history. There have been four
Regional seat of government (2,584 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Regional seats of government or RSGs were the best known aspect of Britain's civil defence preparations against nuclear war. In fact, however, naming conventions
The Long Week-End (308 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Long Week-End is a social history of interwar Britain, written by Robert Graves and Alan Hodge. It was first published in 1940, just after the end
Pattern 1796 light cavalry sabre (1,366 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Pattern 1796 Light Cavalry Sabre is a sword that was used primarily by British light dragoons and hussars, and King's German Legion light cavalry during
Aerial steam carriage (1,477 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The aerial steam carriage, also named Ariel, was a flying machine patented in 1842 that was supposed to carry passengers into the air. It was, in practice
Aftermath of the Falklands War (5,128 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The aftermath of the 1982 Falklands War (Guerra de Malvinas in Spanish) between the United Kingdom and Argentina saw an impact upon world geopolitics,
Andrew Marr's History of Modern Britain (810 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Andrew Marr's History of Modern Britain is a 2007 BBC documentary television series presented by Andrew Marr that covers the period of British history
Lord Lieutenant of Yorkshire (112 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
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Mason Review (272 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1975 Mason Review was a review of UK defence policy conducted by the Labour Government's Secretary of State for Defence, Roy Mason. The review was
Daily Mail Circuit of Britain air race (1,270 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Daily Mail Circuit of Britain air race was a British cross-country air race which took place from 1911 until 1914, with prizes donated by the Daily
Pillbox affair (341 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Pillbox affair, also known as the Pillbox incident, was a military and political episode which occurred in Britain between November 1939 and January
1796 Heavy Cavalry Sword (1,182 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The pattern 1796 Heavy Cavalry Sword was the sword used by the British heavy cavalry (Lifeguards, Royal Horse Guards, Dragoon Guards and Dragoons), and
Foreign Enlistment Act 1870 (794 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Foreign Enlistment Act 1870 (33 & 34 Vict. c.90) is an Act of Parliament of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that seeks to regulate mercenary activities
Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907 (8,257 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907 (7 Edw. 7, c.9) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that reformed the auxiliary forces of the
Project Emily (5,656 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Project Emily was the deployment of American-built Thor intermediate-range ballistic missiles (IRBMs) in the United Kingdom between 1959 and 1963. Royal
Chemical weapons and the United Kingdom (2,522 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chemical weapons were widely used by the United Kingdom in World War I, and while the use of tear gas was suggested by Churchill and others postwar in
Belfast Natural History Society (1,385 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Belfast Natural History and Philosophical Society was founded in 1821 to promote the scientific study of animals, plants, fossils, rocks and minerals
2007 plot to behead a British Muslim soldier (927 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 2007 plot to behead a British Muslim soldier was a plot in Birmingham, England, to kidnap and behead a British Muslim soldier in order to undermine
History of British Airways (10,489 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
British Airways (BA), the United Kingdom's national airline, was formed in 1974 with the merger of the two largest UK airlines, British Overseas Airways
Monarchy (TV series) (132 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Monarchy is a Channel 4 British TV series, 2004–2006, by British academic David Starkey charting the political and ideological history of the English monarchy
Miles M.52 (5,402 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Miles M.52 was a turbojet-powered supersonic research aircraft project designed in the United Kingdom in the mid-1940s. In October 1943, Miles Aircraft
Aircraft and Shipbuilding Industries Act 1977 (1,058 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Aircraft and Shipbuilding Industries Act 1977 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that nationalised large parts of the UK aerospace and
General Post Office, London (582 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The General Post Office in St. Martin's Le Grand (later known as GPO East) was the main post office for London between 1829 and 1910, the headquarters
Lyminster Priory (144 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
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Royal Observer Corps (12,477 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Royal Observer Corps (ROC) was a civil defence organisation intended for the visual detection, identification, tracking and reporting of aircraft over
Maurice Debate (4,350 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Maurice Debate was a debate in the British House of Commons which took place on 9 May 1918, during the First World War. A senior British Army officer
Return of Owners of Land, 1873 (1,955 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The two-volume Return of Owners of Land, 1873 is the first complete picture of the distribution of land in Great Britain since the 1086 Domesday Book.
Nassau Agreement (6,144 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Nassau Agreement, concluded on 21 December 1962, was an agreement negotiated between President of the United States, John F. Kennedy, and Harold Macmillan
Lifeboats of the RMS Titanic (12,935 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The lifeboats of the RMS Titanic played a crucial role in the disaster of 14–15 April 1912. One of the ship's legacies was that she had 20 lifeboats that
Pan Am Flight 103 (12,981 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
people killed, it is the deadliest terrorist attack in the history of the United Kingdom. Following a three-year joint investigation by Dumfries and
Economic League (United Kingdom) (1,669 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Economic League was an organisation in the United Kingdom dedicated to opposing what they saw as subversion and action against free enterprise. As
Unionism in Ireland (28,104 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Unionism in Ireland is a political tradition on the island that professes loyalty to the Crown and Constitution of the United Kingdom. The overwhelming