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Longer titles found: History of Germany (1945–1990) (view), History of Germany during World War I (view), History of Germany since 1990 (view), Military history of Germany (view), Economic history of Germany (view), Postage stamps and postal history of Germany (view), 18th-century history of Germany (view)

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alternate case: history of Germany

Reichswehr (1,462 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

The Reichswehr (English: Realm Defence) formed the military organisation of Germany from 1919 until 1935, when it was united with the new Wehrmacht (Defence
Peace of Westphalia (2,512 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
religions and democracy. p. 103. Section 28 Mary Fulbrook A Concise History of Germany, 2nd ed. (Cambridge University Press, 2004), p. 60. Böhme, Klaus-R
Ostpolitik (1,512 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Neue Ostpolitik (German for "new eastern policy"), or Ostpolitik for short, was the normalization of relations between the Federal Republic of Germany
German Army (1935–1945) (2,720 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The German Army (German: Heer, German: [heːɐ̯] (listen), lit. 'Army') was the land forces component of the Wehrmacht, the regular German Armed Forces,
Operation Jungle (1,400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Operation Jungle was a program by the British Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) early in the Cold War (1948–1955) for the clandestine insertion of intelligence
Landgraviate of Hesse-Darmstadt (579 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Landgraviate of Hesse-Darmstadt (German: Landgrafschaft Hessen-Darmstadt) was a State of the Holy Roman Empire, ruled by a younger branch of the House
Kingdom of Saxony (2,469 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Kingdom of Saxony (German: Königreich Sachsen), lasting between 1806 and 1918, was an independent member of a number of historical confederacies in
Magdeburg rights (901 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magdeburg rights (German: Magdeburger Recht; also called Magdeburg Law) were a set of town privileges first developed by Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor (936–973)
Landgraviate of Hesse-Kassel (1,308 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Landgraviate of Hesse-Kassel (German: Landgrafschaft Hessen-Kassel), spelled Hesse-Cassel during its entire existence, was a state in the Holy Roman
North German Confederation (1,917 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The North German Confederation (German: Norddeutscher Bund) was the German federal state which existed from July 1867 to December 1870. Although de jure
Reichsmarine (988 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Reichsmarine was the name of the German Navy during the Weimar Republic and first two years of Nazi Germany. It was the naval branch of the Reichswehr
Germanisation (6,062 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Germanisation, or Germanization, is the spread of the German language, people and culture. It was a central plank of German conservative thinking in the
German prisoners of war in the Soviet Union (1,731 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Approximately three million German prisoners of war were captured by the Soviet Union during World War II, most of them during the great advances of the
Hesse-Homburg (267 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hesse-Homburg was formed into a separate landgraviate in 1622 by the landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt; it was to be ruled by his son, although it did not become
End of World War II in Europe (4,679 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The final battles of fights in the battle the European Theatre of World War II as well as the German surrender to the Allies took place in late April and
Hohenzollern-Hechingen (412 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hohenzollern-Hechingen was a small principality in southwestern Germany. Its rulers belonged to the Swabian branch of the Hohenzollern dynasty. The County
Enabling Act of 1933 (2,738 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
britannica.com. Retrieved 30 March 2017. Mason, K.J. Republic to Reich: A History of Germany 1918–1945. McGraw-Hill. Kitson, Alison. Germany, 1858–1990: Hope,
Freikorps (3,345 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1994. Mason, K. J.; Fielden, Philip (2007). Republic to Reich: A History of Germany 1918–1939 (Third ed.). Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning Australia
Luftstreitkräfte (3,015 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Deutsche Luftstreitkräfte (German: [ˈdɔʏtʃə ˈlʊftˌʃtʁaɪtkʁɛftə], German Air Force)—known before October 1916 as Die Fliegertruppen des deutschen Kaiserreiches
German military brothels in World War II (1,405 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
German military brothels were set up by Nazi Germany during World War II throughout much of occupied Europe for the use of Wehrmacht and SS soldiers. These
Sudetenland (4,094 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Sudetenland (/suːˈdeɪtənlænd/ (listen); German: [zuˈdeːtn̩ˌlant]; Czech and Slovak: Sudety; Polish: Kraj Sudetów) is the historical German name for
List of German monarchs (939 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of monarchs who ruled over East Francia, and the Kingdom of Germany (Regnum Teutonicum), from the division of the Frankish Empire in 843
Monarchy of Germany (916 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Monarchy of Germany (the German Monarchy) was the system of government in which a hereditary monarch was the sovereign of the German Empire from 1871
Byelorussian Auxiliary Police (934 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Byelorussian Auxiliary Police (Belarusian: Беларуская дапаможная паліцыя, romanized: Biełaruskaja dapamožnaja palicyja; German: Weißruthenische Schutzmannschaften
Westphalian sovereignty (2,833 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Westphalian sovereignty, or state sovereignty, is a principle in international law that each state has exclusive sovereignty over its territory. The principle
Hyperinflation in the Weimar Republic (3,031 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hyperinflation affected the German Papiermark, the currency of the Weimar Republic, between 1921 and 1923, primarily in 1923. It caused considerable internal
Duchy of Cleves (827 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 51°47′N 6°8′E / 51.783°N 6.133°E / 51.783; 6.133 The Duchy of Cleves (German: Herzogtum Kleve; Dutch: Hertogdom Kleef) was a State of the
Kriegsmarine (7,277 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Kriegsmarine (German pronunciation: [ˈkʁiːksmaˌʁiːnə], lit. '"War Navy"') was the navy of Nazi Germany from 1935 to 1945. It superseded the Imperial
Pickelhaube (2,431 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Pickelhaube (plural Pickelhauben; from the German Pickel, "point" or "pickaxe", and Haube, "bonnet", a general word for "headgear"), also Pickelhelm
Electorate of Bavaria (2,330 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Electorate of Bavaria (German: Kurfürstentum Bayern) was an independent hereditary electorate of the Holy Roman Empire from 1623 to 1806, when it was
German Renaissance (2,089 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The German Renaissance, part of the Northern Renaissance, was a cultural and artistic movement that spread among German thinkers in the 15th and 16th centuries
Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (2,309 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen was a principality in southwestern Germany. Its rulers belonged to the senior Swabian branch of the House of Hohenzollern. The
Gay fascism (2,928 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gay fascism is the discredited idea that homosexuals were numerous and prominent as a group in the Nazi Party or the identification of Nazism with homosexuality
German Naval Laws (2,482 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Naval Laws (German: Flottengesetze, "Fleet Laws") were five separate laws passed by the German Empire, in 1898, 1900, 1906, 1908, and 1912. These acts
Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (2,309 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen was a principality in southwestern Germany. Its rulers belonged to the senior Swabian branch of the House of Hohenzollern. The
Freiburg school (295 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Freiburg School (German: Freiburger Schule) is a school of economic thought founded in the 1930s at the University of Freiburg. It builds somewhat
GIUK gap (1,511 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The GIUK gap is an area in the northern Atlantic Ocean that forms a naval choke point. Its name is an acronym for Greenland, Iceland, and the United Kingdom
Four Power Agreement on Berlin (786 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Four Power Agreement on Berlin, also known as the Berlin Agreement or the Quadripartite Agreement on Berlin, was agreed on 3 September 1971 by the
Prussian House of Lords (848 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Prussian House of Lords (German: Preußisches Herrenhaus) in Berlin was the upper house of the Preußischer Landtag, the parliament of Prussia from 1850
Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (1,446 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (German: Sachsen-Coburg-Saalfeld) was one of the Saxon Duchies held by the Ernestine line of the Wettin Dynasty. Established in 1699
Upper Rhenish Circle (120 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Upper Rhenish Circle (German: Oberrheinischer Reichskreis) was an Imperial Circle of the Holy Roman Empire established in 1500 on the territory of
Duchy of Berg (1,263 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Berg was a state—originally a county, later a duchy—in the Rhineland of Germany. Its capital was Düsseldorf. It existed as a distinct political entity
Scuttling of the German fleet at Scapa Flow (3,766 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The scuttling of the German fleet took place at the Royal Navy's base at Scapa Flow, in the Orkney Islands of Scotland, shortly after the First World War
Frankfurt Constitution (822 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Frankfurt Constitution (German: Frankfurter Reichsverfassung, FRV) or Constitution of St. Paul's Church (Paulskirchenverfassung), officially named
Arndt Verlag (303 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arndt Verlag is a German publishing house that belongs to the publishing group of the neo-Nazi publisher Dietmar Munier [de]. It specialises in historical
Thurn und Taxis (1,555 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Princely House of Thurn and Taxis (German: Fürstenhaus Thurn und Taxis [ˈtuːɐ̯n ʊnt ˈtaksɪs]) is a family of German nobility that is part of the Briefadel
Abortion in Germany (1,172 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abortion in Germany is illegal under Section 218 of the German criminal code but simultaneously decriminalized under Section 218a of the German criminal
Werwolf (5,785 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
after the German surrender. German historian Golo Mann, in his The History of Germany Since 1789 (1984) also states that "The [Germans'] readiness to work
Grand Duchy of Baden (4,765 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Grand Duchy of Baden (German: Großherzogtum Baden) was a state in the southwest German Empire on the east bank of the Rhine. It existed between 1806
Western Front (World War II) (6,795 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Western Front was a military theatre of World War II encompassing Denmark, Norway, Luxembourg, Belgium, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, France
Latvian Auxiliary Police (2,225 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Latvian Auxiliary Police was a paramilitary force created from Latvian volunteers by the Nazi German authorities who occupied the country in June 1941
German war crimes (4,511 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The governments of the German Empire and Nazi Germany ordered, organized and condoned a substantial number of war crimes, first in the Herero and Namaqua
J.J. Fedorowicz Publishing (1,137 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
J.J. Fedorowicz Publishing is a Canadian publishing house that specialises in literature on the German armed forces of the World War II era. Its authors
Ukrainian Auxiliary Police (2,864 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Ukrainische Hilfspolizei or the Ukrainian Auxiliary Police (Ukrainian: Українська допоміжна поліція, Ukrains'ka dopomizhna politsiia) was the official
Hanseatic League (6,889 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Hanseatic League (/ˌhænsiˈætɪk/; Middle Low German: Hanse, Düdesche Hanse, Hansa; German language: Deutsche Hanse; Dutch language: De Hanze; Latin:
National champions (1,121 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
National champions are corporations which are technically private businesses but due to governmental policy are ceded a dominant position in a national
Group of Soviet Forces in Germany (2,216 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Western Group of Forces (WGF), previously known as the Group of Soviet Occupation Forces in Germany (GSOFG) and the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany
Imperial German Navy (8,203 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Imperial German Navy (German: Kaiserliche Marine) was the navy created at the time of the formation of the German Empire. It existed between 1871 and
Commissar Order (1,948 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Commissar Order (German: Kommissarbefehl) was an order issued by the German High Command (OKW) on 6 June 1941 before Operation Barbarossa. Its official
Gebirgsjäger (1,259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gebirgsjäger (German pronunciation: [ɡəˈbɪʁksˌjɛːɡɐ]) are the light infantry part of the alpine or mountain troops (Gebirgstruppe) of Germany, Austria
Cameralism (1,948 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cameralism (German: Kameralismus) was a German science of administration in the 18th and early 19th centuries that aimed at strong management of a centralized
Germany and the Second World War (222 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Germany and the Second World War (German: Das Deutsche Reich und der Zweite Weltkrieg) is a 12,000-page, 13-volume work published by the Deutsche Verlags-Anstalt
Schutzmannschaft Battalion 118 (1,281 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Schutzmannschaft Battalion 118 (Ukrainian Schuma) was a Schutzmannschaft auxiliary police battalion (Schuma). The core of the Schutzmannschaft battalion
Geheimrat (873 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Geheimrat was the title of the highest advising officials at the Imperial, royal or princely courts of the Holy Roman Empire, who jointly formed the Geheimer
Volksmarine (1,322 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Volksmarine (VM, German pronunciation: [ˈfɔlksmaˌʁiːne]; English: People's Navy) was the naval force of the German Democratic Republic (GDR) from 1956
Occupation of the Rhineland (1,540 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Occupation of the Rhineland from 1 December 1918 until 30 June 1930 was a consequence of the collapse of the Imperial German Army in 1918. Despite
Military History Research Office (Germany) (935 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Military History Research Office (German: Militärgeschichtliches Forschungsamt, MGFA) is an office of the Bundeswehr located at Potsdam, Germany. Following
German rearmament (2,873 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
German rearmament (Aufrüstung, German pronunciation: [ˈaʊ̯fˌʀʏstʊŋ]) was a policy and practice of rearmament carried out in Germany during the interwar
Military Administration of Luxembourg (358 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Military Administration of Luxembourg was a German military administration in German-occupied Luxembourg that existed from 11 May 1940 to 29 July 1940
County of East Frisia (983 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The County of East-Frisia (Dutch: Graafschap Oost-Friesland) was a county (though ruled by a prince after 1662) in the region of East Frisia in the northwest
Federal Agency for Civic Education (774 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Federal Agency for Civic Education, FACE (German: Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung, bpb) is a German federal government agency responsible for
States of the German Confederation (808 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The states of the German Confederation were those member states that from 20 June 1815 were part of the German Confederation, which lasted, with some changes
Foreign U-boats (291 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Foreign U-Boats was the title for a special section created by Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine that adopted 13 captured enemy submarines and a single Turkish
Klaipėda Region (3,845 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Klaipėda Region (Lithuanian: Klaipėdos kraštas) or Memel Territory (German: Memelland or Memelgebiet) was defined by the 1919 Treaty of Versailles
Weimar Constitution (4,157 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Constitution of the German Reich (German: Die Verfassung des Deutschen Reichs), usually known as the Weimar Constitution (Weimarer Verfassung), was
West Berlin discotheque bombing (1,023 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
On 5 April 1986, three people were killed and 229 injured when La Belle discothèque was bombed in the Friedenau district of West Berlin. The entertainment
Reichskommissariat Don-Wolga (266 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Reichskommissariat Don-Wolga, literally "Reich Commissariat Don-Volga", was a theoretical civilian occupation regime of Nazi Germany discussed during the
German-occupied Poland (184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
German-occupied Poland during World War II consisted of two major parts with different types of administration. The Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany
Danzig law (929 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Danzig law (German: Danziger Willkür; in Polish: Gdański Wilkierz ) was the official set of records of the laws of city of Danzig (Gdańsk). The models
Paragraph 175 (5,179 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
In the Soviet occupation zone that later became East Germany (see History of Germany since 1945), the development of law was not uniform. The Provincial
Reichskommissariat Turkestan (776 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Reichskommissariat Turkestan (also spelled as Turkistan, abbreviated as RKT) was a projected Reichskommissariat that Germany proposed to create in the
Gliding at the 1936 Summer Olympics (337 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gliding at the 1936 Summer Olympics was a demonstration sport. The sport of gliding had been developed in Germany in the 1920s but had spread widely by
Hunger Plan (2,655 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Hunger Plan (German: der Hungerplan; der Backe-Plan) was a plan developed by Nazi Germany during World War II to seize food from the Soviet Union and
Venezuelan crisis of 1902–1903 (4,133 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Venezuelan crisis of 1902–1903 was a naval blockade imposed against Venezuela by Great Britain, Germany and Italy from December 1902 to February 1903
Civil Administration Area of Luxembourg (775 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Civil Administration Area of Luxembourg was a German civil administration in German-occupied Luxembourg that existed from 29 July 1940 to 30 August
Reichskommissariat Ostland (3,132 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 56°N 26°E / 56°N 26°E / 56; 26 Nazi Germany established the Reichskommissariat Ostland (RKO) in 1941 during World War II. It became the
SS Heimwehr Danzig (777 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
SS Heimwehr "Danzig" was an SS unit established in the Free City of Danzig (today Gdańsk and environs, Poland) before the Second World War. It fought with
Reichskommissariat Ukraine (3,990 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
During World War II, Reichskommissariat Ukraine (abbreviated as RKU) was the civilian occupation regime (Reichskommissariat) of much of Nazi German-occupied
Kaiser Wilhelm Society (2,151 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Kaiser Wilhelm Society for the Advancement of Science (German Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften) was a German scientific
Munich massacre (10,325 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Munich massacre was an attack during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, by eight members of the Palestinian terrorist group Black September
Zollverein (3,140 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Zollverein (pronounced [ˈtsɔlfɛɐ̯ˌʔaɪn]), or German Customs Union, was a coalition of German states formed to manage tariffs and economic policies
Sonderdienst (927 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sonderdienst (German: Special Services) were the Nazi German paramilitary formations created in semicolonial General Government during the occupation of
Reichskommissariat Moskowien (1,511 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Reichskommissariat Moskowien (RKM; Russian: Рейхскомиссариат Московия), also spelled as Moskau, literally "Reich Commissariat of Muscovy (or Moscow)",
Seekriegsleitung (352 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Seekriegsleitung or SKL (Maritime Warfare Command) was a higher command staff section of the Kaiserliche Marine and the Kriegsmarine of Germany during
Bombing of Augsburg in World War II (968 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The bombing of Augsburg in World War II included two British RAF and one USAAF bombing raids against the German city of Augsburg on 17 April 1942 and 25/26
Castles of Steel (428 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Castles of Steel: Britain, Germany, and the Winning of the Great War at Sea is a work of non-fiction by Pulitzer Prize-winner Robert K. Massie. It narrates
Hanau-Lichtenberg (1,396 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The County of Hanau-Lichtenberg was a territory in the Holy Roman Empire. It emerged between 1456–80 from a part of the County of Hanau and one half of
Aulic Council (434 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Aulic Council (Latin: Consilium Aulicum, German: Reichshofrat, literally meaning Court Council of the Empire) was one of the two supreme courts of
American Theater (World War II) (7,051 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The American Theater was a theater of operations during World War II including all continental American territory, and extending 200 miles (320 km) into
Kiel mutiny (2,316 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Kiel mutiny (German: Kieler Matrosenaufstand) was a major revolt by sailors of the German High Seas Fleet on 3 November 1918. The revolt triggered
Waffen-SS (16,987 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Waffen-SS (German: [ˈvafn̩ʔɛsˌʔɛs], "Armed SS") was the military branch of the Nazi Party's SS organisation. Its formations included men from Nazi
Saxe-Coburg (2,048 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saxe-Coburg (German: Sachsen-Coburg) was a duchy held by the Ernestine branch of the Wettin dynasty in today's Bavaria, Germany. When Henry IV, Count of
Luftwaffenhelfer (501 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A Luftwaffenhelfer, also commonly known as a Flakhelfer, was, strictly speaking, any member of the auxiliary staff of the German Luftwaffe during World
German Empire (1848–49) (1,334 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The German Empire (German: Deutsches Reich) was a short-lived nation state which existed from 1848 to 1849. The state was created by the Frankfurt Parliament
Mitteleuropa (3,275 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mitteleuropa (pronounced [ˈmɪtl̩ʔɔʏˌroːpa]), meaning Middle Europe, is one of the German terms for Central Europe. The term has acquired diverse cultural
Elector of Mainz (1,400 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and vigorous state. Among these men were important figures in the history of Germany such as Hatto I, Siegfried III, Peter of Aspelt, and Albert of Mainz
Freedom Bell (684 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Freedom Bell (in German, Freiheitsglocke) in Berlin, Germany, is a bell that was given as a gift from Americans to the city of Berlin in 1950 as a
Weltpolitik (623 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Weltpolitik (German: [ˈvɛltpoliˌtiːk], "world politics") was the imperialist foreign policy adopted by the German Empire during the reign of Emperor Wilhelm
Bergregal (2,208 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bergregal (German: [ˈbɛʁk.ʁeˌɡaːl]) was the historic right of ownership of untapped mineral resources in parts of German-speaking Europe; ownership
Socialist Workers' Party of Germany (420 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Socialist Workers' Party of Germany (German: Sozialistische Arbeiterpartei Deutschlands, SAPD) was a centrist Marxist political party in Germany. It
Byelorussian Home Defence (1,010 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Byelorussian Home Defence, or Byelorussian Home Guard (Belarusian: Беларуская краёвая абарона, Bielaruskaja Krajovaja Abarona, BKA; German: Weißruthenische
Valentin submarine pens (2,282 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Valentin submarine factory is a protective shelter on the Weser River at the Bremen suburb of Rekum [de; nds], built to construct German U-boats during
German mediatisation (6,854 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
German mediatisation (English: /miːdiətaɪˈzeɪʃən/; German: deutsche Mediatisierung) was the major territorial restructuring that took place between 1802
Reichskommissariat Niederlande (3,356 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Reichskommissariat Niederlande was the civilian occupation regime set up by Germany in the German-occupied Netherlands during World War II. Its full
Göttingen Manifesto (560 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Göttingen Manifesto was a declaration of 18 leading nuclear scientists of West Germany (among them the Nobel laureates Otto Hahn, Max Born, Werner
Reichskommissariat Kaukasus (1,609 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Reichskommissariat Kaukasus (Russian: Рейхскомиссариат Кавказ), also spelled as Kaukasien, was the theoretical political division and planned civilian
Plan Z (2,551 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Plan Z was the name given to the planned re-equipment and expansion of the Kriegsmarine (German navy) ordered by Adolf Hitler in early 1939. The fleet
Collaboration in German-occupied Ukraine (3,157 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Collaboration with Nazi Germany in German-occupied Ukraine took place during the military occupation of modern-day Ukraine by Nazi Germany in World War
Postschutz (285 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Postschutz (Postal Protection), in 1942 SS-Postschutz, was a paramilitary unit of Deutsche Reichspost with a mission to protect post office installations
Vormärz (901 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
pronunciation: [ˈfoːɐ̯ˌmɛʁts]; English: pre-March) was a period in the history of Germany preceding the 1848 March Revolution in the states of the German Confederation
Rundfunk im amerikanischen Sektor (825 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
RIAS (German: Rundfunk im amerikanischen Sektor; English: Radio in the American Sector) was a radio and television station in the American Sector of Berlin
Margraviate of Brandenburg (3,465 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Roman Empire from 1157 to 1806 that played a pivotal role in the history of Germany and Central Europe. Brandenburg developed out of the Northern March
Peaceful Revolution (7,792 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Peaceful Revolution (German: Friedliche Revolution) was the process of sociopolitical change that led to the opening of East Germany's borders with
Morgenthau Plan (9,656 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
German reparations for World War II Industrial plans for Germany History of Germany since 1945 Marshall Plan Monnet Plan, a 1945–1947 reconstruction plan
Anglo-German Naval Agreement (7,705 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Anglo-German Naval Agreement (AGNA) of 18 June 1935 was a naval agreement between the United Kingdom and Germany regulating the size of the Kriegsmarine
South German gulden (520 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Gulden was the currency of the states of southern Germany between 1754 and 1873. These states included Bavaria, Baden, Württemberg, Frankfurt and Hohenzollern
Sino-German cooperation (1926–1941) (4,859 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Cooperation between China and Germany was instrumental in modernizing the industry and the armed forces of the Republic of China between 1926 and 1941
Operation Source (1,576 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Operation Source was a series of attacks to neutralise the heavy German warships – Tirpitz, Scharnhorst and Lützow – based in northern Norway, using X-class
Wehrmachtbericht (2,340 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wehrmachtbericht (literally: "Armed forces report", usually translated as Wehrmacht communiqué or Wehrmacht report) was the daily Wehrmacht High Command
Hiberno-Scottish mission (1,614 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Thus, the "Scot" missionaries who so influential in the early Church history of Germany included men from both present-day nations, but mainly from Ireland
Demographic history of Pomerania (403 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
either. Pomerenian history was, from that time, closely tied to the history of Germany, Denmark and Sweden, whereas Pomerelian history was also until 1308
United Duchies of Jülich-Cleves-Berg (500 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jülich-Cleves-Berg was the name of two former territories across the modern German state of North Rhine-Westphalia and the modern Dutch province of Gelderland
Laconia incident (4,669 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Laconia incident was a series of events surrounding the sinking of a British troopship in the Atlantic Ocean on 12 September 1942, during World War
Lübeck law (783 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Lübeck law (German: Lübisches (Stadt)Recht) was the constitution of a municipal form of government developed at Lübeck, now in Schleswig-Holstein,
The Myth of the Eastern Front (2,945 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Myth of the Eastern Front: The Nazi–Soviet War in American Popular Culture is a 2008 book by the American historians Ronald Smelser and Edward J. Davies
West German rearmament (1,897 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
West German rearmament (German: Wiederbewaffnung) refers to the United States program to help rebuild the military of West Germany after World War II.
Brandenburg-Prussia (7,160 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Brandenburg-Prussia (German: Brandenburg-Preußen; Low German: Brannenborg-Preußen) is the historiographic denomination for the Early Modern realm of the
Treaty battleship (2,669 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A treaty battleship was a battleship built in the 1920s or 1930s under the terms of one of a number of international treaties governing warship construction
Protestant Union (1,147 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Protestant Union (German: Protestantische Union), also known as the Evangelical Union, Union of Auhausen, German Union or the Protestant Action Party
Duchy of Westphalia (1,106 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Duchy of Westphalia (German: Herzogtum Westfalen) was a historic territory in the Holy Roman Empire, which existed from 1180. It was located in the
Legion Speer (360 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Legion Speer was a Nazi German paramilitary motor transportation corps founded in 1942. The members of the Legion were non-German citizens, and as such
German General Staff (7,696 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Verlag. pp. 174–175. ISBN 978-3-17-012097-6. Raff, Diethher (1988), History of Germany from the Medieval Empire to the Present, Oxford, pp. 34–55, 202–206
Anglo-German naval arms race (4,090 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The arms race between Great Britain and Germany that occurred from the last decade of the nineteenth century until the advent of World War I in 1914 was
Battle of Vosges (58 BC) (1,746 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Battle of Vosges, also referred to as the Battle of Vesontio, was fought in 58 BC between the Germanic tribe of the Suebi, under the leadership of
Criminal orders (210 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Criminal orders is the collective name given to a series of orders, directives and decrees given during the Invasion of the Soviet Union in World War II
Criminal orders (210 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Criminal orders is the collective name given to a series of orders, directives and decrees given during the Invasion of the Soviet Union in World War II
List of presidents of the Reichstag (49 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The President of the Reichstag was the presiding officer of the German legislature from 1871 to 1918, under the German Empire and again from 1920 to 1945
Reichsgericht (294 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 51°19′59″N 12°22′11″E / 51.33306°N 12.36972°E / 51.33306; 12.36972 The Reichsgericht (German: [ˈʁaɪçs.ɡəˌʁɪçt], Imperial Court of Justice)
Burgfriedenspolitik (367 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Burgfriedenspolitik (German: [ˈbʊʁkfʁiːdn̩s.poliˌtiːk]), literally "castle peace politics" but more accurately a political policy of "party truce", is
Bühl-Stollhofen Line (740 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bühl-Stollhofen Line (German: Bühl-Stollhofener Linie) or Lines of Stollhofen was a line of defensive earthworks built for the Reichsarmee in the War
Ukrainian People's Militia (1,646 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ukrainian People's Militia or the Ukrainian National Militia (Ukrainian: Українська Народна Міліція), was a paramilitary formation created by the Organization
The Last Jew in Vinnitsa (926 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Last Jew in Vinnitsa is a photograph taken during the Holocaust in Ukraine showing a Jewish man near the town of Vinnitsa (Vinnytsia) about to be shot
Widow conservation (1,514 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Widow conservation was a practice in Protestant Europe in the early modern age, when the widow of a parish vicar (or sometimes her daughter) would marry
Sippenhaft (1,131 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sippenhaft or Sippenhaftung (German: [ˈzɪpənˌhaft(ʊŋ)], kin liability) is a German term for the idea that a family or clan shares the responsibility for
War crimes of the Wehrmacht (14,139 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
During World War II, the Germans' combined armed forces (Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe) committed systematic war crimes, including massacres, mass rape
Transportflotte Speer (453 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Transportflotte Speer was a government owned waterways transportation company in Nazi Germany. At its creation it was tasked with the transportation of
Anglo-Iraqi War (11,879 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Anglo–Iraqi War (2–31 May 1941) was a British-led Allied military campaign against Iraq under Rashid Ali, who had seized power during the Second World
Guidelines for the Conduct of the Troops in Russia (265 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Guidelines for the Conduct of the Troops in Russia was a "criminal order" issued on 19 May 1941, during World War II. The guidelines detailed the expected
Massacre of the Acqui Division (5,282 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Massacre of the Acqui Division, also known as the Cephalonia Massacre, was the mass execution of the men of the Italian 33rd Infantry Division Acqui
Landsturm (1,058 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In German-speaking countries, the term Landsturm was historically used to refer to militia or military units composed of troops of inferior quality. It
Article 48 (Weimar Constitution) (1,824 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Article 48 of the constitution of the Weimar Republic of Germany (1919–1933) allowed the President, under certain circumstances, to take emergency measures
Hesse-Rheinfels (499 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hesse-Rheinfels was created as a cadet line of Hesse for Philip II, Landgrave of Hesse-Rheinfels (1541–1583), landgrave from 1567 until 1583, and as a
Naval history of World War II (10,926 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In the beginning of World War II the Royal Navy was the strongest navy in the world, with the largest number of warships built and with naval bases across
Selbstschutz (2,059 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Selbstschutz (German for "self-protection") is the name given to different iterations of ethnic-German self-protection units formed both after the First
Pan-German League (1,197 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Pan-German League (German: Alldeutscher Verband) was a Pan-German nationalist organization which officially founded in 1891, a year after the Zanzibar
Postage stamps and postal history of the Caroline Islands (368 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Early mail sent to and from the Caroline Islands was occasional and dependent on visiting ships. The Spanish authorities issued no postage stamps or postmarks
Myth of the clean Wehrmacht (11,653 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Forschungsamt (Military Research Office) started publishing the official history of Germany in the Second World War, and the successive volumes have been very
Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact (15,802 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact was a non-aggression pact between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union that enabled those two powers to partition Poland between
Nachtigall Battalion (2,026 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Nachtigall Battalion (English: Nightingale Battalion), also known as the Ukrainian Nightingale Battalion Group (German: Bataillon Ukrainische Gruppe
Bremen-Verden (6,668 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bremen-Verden, formally the Duchies of Bremen and Verden (German pronunciation: [ˈfɛɐ̯dən]; German: Herzogtümer Bremen und Verden), were two territories
Ghost station (4,437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ghost stations is the usual English translation for the German word Geisterbahnhöfe. This term was used to describe certain stations on Berlin's U-Bahn
Transportkorps Speer (646 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Transportkorps Speer was created in 1944 from Legion Speer and the units of the National Socialist Motor Corps that was serving the Organisation Todt.
Mathias Rust (2,349 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mathias Rust (born 1 June 1968)[citation needed] is a German aviator known for his illegal flight that ended with a landing near Red Square in Moscow on
Rhineland Bastard (1,395 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rhineland Bastard (German: Rheinlandbastard) was a derogatory and racist term used in Nazi Germany to describe Afro-Germans, believed fathered by French
Manstein Plan (3,981 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Manstein Plan is one of the names used to describe the war plan of the German Army during the Battle of France in 1940. The original invasion plan
Territorial evolution of Germany (5,200 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The territorial changes of Germany include all changes in the borders and territory of Germany from its formation in 1871 to the present. Modern Germany
Industrial Heritage Trail (181 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Industrial Heritage Trail (German: Route der Industriekultur) links tourist attractions related to the industrial heritage in the Ruhr area in Germany
Judgment in Berlin (542 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Judgment in Berlin is a 1984 book by federal judge Herbert Jay Stern about a hijacking trial in the United States Court for Berlin in 1979, over which
Hesse-Marburg (444 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Landgraviate of Hesse-Marburg (German: Landgrafschaft Hessen-Marburg) was a German landgraviate, and independent principality, within the Holy Roman
German Imperial Naval High Command (263 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The German Imperial Naval High Command (German: Kaiserliches Oberkommando der Marine) was an office of the German Empire which existed from 1 April 1889
Pigeon photography (3,955 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pigeon photography is an aerial photography technique invented in 1907 by the German apothecary Julius Neubronner, who also used pigeons to deliver medications
Traffic light coalition (944 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Traffic light coalition (direct translation of German: Ampelkoalition) is a term originating in German politics where it describes a coalition government
Dreadnought (book) (243 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Dreadnought: Britain, Germany, and the Coming of the Great War (1991) is a book by Robert K. Massie on the growing European tension in decades before World
HIAG (8,866 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
HIAG (German: Hilfsgemeinschaft auf Gegenseitigkeit der Angehörigen der ehemaligen Waffen-SS, literally "Mutual aid association of former Waffen-SS members")
Basis Nord (1,450 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Basis Nord Basis Nord ("Base North") was a secret naval base of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine in Zapadnaya Litsa, west of Murmansk provided by the Soviet
August Becker (3,416 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
August Becker (17 August 1900 – 31 December 1967) was a mid-ranking functionary in the SS of Nazi Germany and chemist in the Reich Main Security Office
Parlamentarischer Rat (961 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Parlamentarischer Rat (German for "Parliamentary Council") was the West German constituent assembly in Bonn that drafted and adopted the constitution
North German Federal Navy (203 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The North German Federal Navy (Norddeutsche Bundesmarine or Marine des Norddeutschen Bundes), was the Navy of the North German Confederation, formed out
Gun control in Germany (3,361 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In Germany, access to guns is controlled by the German Weapons Act (German: Waffengesetz) which adheres to the European Firearms Directive, first enacted
Duchy of Württemberg (8,560 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Duchy of Württemberg (German: Herzogtum Württemberg) was a duchy located in the south-western part of the Holy Roman Empire. It was a member of the
Polar 3 (631 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Polar 3 was a Dornier Do 228 owned and operated by the Alfred Wegener Institute that was shot down south of Dakhla, Western Sahara by guerrillas of the
German Mine Sweeping Administration (970 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The German Mine Sweeping Administration (GMSA) was an organisation formed by the Allies from former crews and vessels of the Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine
Gehlen Organization (2,321 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Gehlen Organization or Gehlen Org was an intelligence agency established in June 1946 by U.S. occupation authorities in the United States zone of Germany
Berlin Brigade (1,524 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Berlin Brigade was a US Army brigade-sized garrison based in West Berlin during the Cold War. After the end of World War II, under the conditions of
Paul Harteck (1,126 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paul Karl Maria Harteck (20 July 1902 – 22 January 1985) was an Austrian physical chemist. In 1945 under Operation Epsilon in "the big sweep" throughout
Deutsche Dienststelle (WASt) (1,362 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Deutsche Dienststelle (WASt) is a German government agency based in Berlin which maintains records of members of the former German Wehrmacht who were
Operation Pelikan (253 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Operation Pelikan (German: Unternehmen Pelikan), also known as Projekt 14, was a German plan for crippling the Panama Canal during World War II. In mid-late
Black bloc (5,186 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
doi:10.1111/1467-8365.12129. Bild, Ullstein (19 February 1977). "History of Germany 1963–1988" (gallery). UK: TopFoto. p. 37. Archived from the original
Recovered Territories (9,516 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Recovered Territories (Polish: Ziemie Odzyskane, literally Regained Lands, later informally called Polish: Ziemie Zachodnie, literally Western Lands) was
Wehrmacht Propaganda Troops (484 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wehrmacht Propaganda Troops (German: Wehrmachtpropaganda, abbreviated as WPr) was a branch of service of the Wehrmacht and the Waffen-SS of Nazi Germany
German nuclear weapons program (11,226 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The German nuclear weapons program (German: Uranprojekt; informally known as the Uranverein; English: Uranium Club) was an unsuccessful scientific effort
Bundeswehr Military History Museum (2,152 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bundeswehr Military History Museum (German: Militärhistorisches Museum der Bundeswehr (MHMBw)) is the military museum of the German Armed Forces, the
World War II reparations (2,579 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
After World War II both West Germany and East Germany were obliged to pay war reparations to the Allied governments, according to the Potsdam Conference
Constitution of the German Empire (1,950 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Constitution of the German Empire (German: Verfassung des Deutschen Reiches) was the basic law of the German Empire of 1871-1918, from 16 April 1871
Samoan crisis (842 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Samoan Crisis was a standoff between the United States, Germany, and Great Britain from 1887–1889 over control of the Samoan Islands during the Samoan
Volodymyr Kubiyovych (1,568 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Volodymyr Mykhailovych Kubiyovych, also spelled Kubiiovych or Kubijovyč (Ukrainian: Володи́мир Миха́йлович Кубійо́вич; 23 September 1900, Nowy Sącz, Austrian
Wendy Lower (937 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Memorial Museum in Washington, DC. Lower's research areas include the history of Germany and Ukraine in World War II, the Holocaust, women's history, the history
North German Constitution (284 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The North German Constitution was the constitution of the North German Confederation, which existed as a country from 1 July 1867 to 31 December 1870.
Reichsforschungsrat (890 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Reichsforschungsrat was created in Germany in 1936 under the Education Ministry for the purpose of centralized planning of all basic and applied research
Battle of Idistaviso (879 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Idistaviso, sometimes known as a first Battle of Minden or Battle of the Weser River, was fought in 16 AD between Roman legions commanded
Oktoberfest bombing (637 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Oktoberfest bombing was a terrorist attack with a right-wing radical motive. On 26 September 1980, 12 people were killed and 211 were injured by the
Landgraviate of Hesse-Rotenburg (812 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hesse-Rotenburg is a former German landgraviate created from the landgraviate of Hesse-Cassel in 1627. Its independence ended in 1834 when the estates
LOT Polish Airlines Flight 165 hijacking (979 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
LOT Polish Airlines Flight 165 hijacking was the hijacking of a LOT Polish Airlines that occurred on 30 August 1978. The hijackers from East Germany (GDR)
Fliegerführer Afrika (279 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fliegerführer Afrika was part of Luftflotte 2 (Air Fleet 2), one of the primary divisions of the German Luftwaffe in World War II. It operated in the Mediterranean
Annals of the Empire (117 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Annals of the Empire (Annales de l’Empire) is a history of Germany written by the French philosopher and author Voltaire in 1753. It is largely compiled
Operation Bolívar (2,882 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
portal Latin America portal Argentina during World War II Military history of Germany during World War II Spain in World War II British Security Coordination
Egerland (1,255 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Egerland (Czech: Chebsko; German: Egerland; Egerland German dialect: Eghalånd) is a historical region in the far north west of Bohemia in the Czech
Eschede (275 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the "Gemeinde Eschede". In 1975, the largest forest fire in the history of Germany destroyed vast tracts of forests in the area. The place is also known
Wehrmachtsausstellung (1,115 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Wehrmachtsausstellung (German; lit. '"Wehrmacht Exhibition"') was a series of two exhibitions focusing on the war crimes of the Wehrmacht during World
Fulda Gap (2,295 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
3/11 2/11 RHQ 1/11 CAS CSS 3rd Armd Div 8th Mech Div 79th GTD 27th GMRD 39th GMRD 57th GMRD The Fulda Gap (German: Fulda-Lücke), an area between the Hesse-Thuringian
Lesser Germany (890 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The term Lesser Germany (German: Kleindeutschland, in opposition to 'Greater Germany') relates essentially to Germany without Austria. In the 19th century
The End: Hitler's Germany, 1944–45 (1,151 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The End: Hitler's Germany 1944–45 is a 2011 book by Sir Ian Kershaw, in which the author charts the course of World War II between the period of the failed
Freemasonry (10,041 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
OCLC 31009810. Zierer, Otto (1976). Concise History of Great Nations: History of Germany. New York: Leon Amiel Publisher. p. 104. ISBN 978-0-8148-0673-9. OCLC 3250405
Lipetsk fighter-pilot school (822 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Lipetsk fighter-pilot school (German: Kampffliegerschule Lipezk, also known as WIWUPAL from its disguise German name, Wissenschaftliche Versuchs- und
Alpine Fortress (1,227 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Alpine Fortress (German: Alpenfestung) or Alpine Redoubt was the World War II national redoubt planned by Heinrich Himmler in November and December
Battle of Heiligerlee (1568) (322 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
History, (HarperCollins Publishers, 1993), 528. Menzel, Wolfgang, The history of Germany: from the earliest period to 1842, Vol.2, (George Bell & sons, 1908)
Hirth HM 508 (564 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Hirth HM 508 was an air-cooled, eight-cylinder, 60° cylinder bank angle inverted-V aircraft engine built in Germany in the 1930s. It had a bore and
French–German enmity (4,500 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
French–German (Franco-German) enmity (French: Rivalité franco-allemande, German: Deutsch–französische Erbfeindschaft) was the idea of unavoidably hostile
East Germany–West Germany football rivalry (2,805 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The rivalry between football teams from East Germany and West Germany lasted from 1949 to 1990. Clubs from the two countries met at official level in both
Mission-type tactics (3,242 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mission-type tactics (German: Auftragstaktik, from Auftrag and Taktik; also known as mission command in the US and UK), is a form of military tactics where
German–Soviet Border and Commercial Agreement (3,197 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The German–Soviet Border and Commercial Agreement, signed on January 10, 1941, was a broad agreement which settled border disputes, and continued raw materials
Fritz Houtermans (2,132 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Friedrich Georg "Fritz" Houtermans (January 22, 1903 – March 1, 1966) was a Dutch-Austrian-German atomic and nuclear physicist born in Zoppot near Danzig
Lithuanian Territorial Defense Force (2,655 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Lithuanian Territorial Defense Force or LTDF (Lithuanian: Lietuvos vietinė rinktinė, LVR, German: Litauische Sonderverbände) was a short-lived, Lithuanian
Siegfried Flügge (1,822 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Siegfried Flügge (16 March 1912, in Dresden – 15 December 1997, in Hinterzarten) was a German theoretical physicist and made contributions to nuclear physics
Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany (10,268 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Following the Invasion of Poland at the beginning of World War II, nearly a quarter of the entire territory of the Second Polish Republic was annexed by
Thälmann Battalion (1,431 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Thälmann Battalion was a battalion of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War. It was named after the imprisoned German communist leader
Topographia Germaniae (337 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Topographia Germaniae (1642 – c. 1660s) is a multi-volume series of books created by engraver Matthäus Merian and writer Martin Zeiler, and published in
Hesse-Hanau (595 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hesse-Hanau was a territory in the Holy Roman Empire. It emerged when the former county of Hanau-Münzenberg became a secundogeniture of Hesse-Cassel in
Henning von Holtzendorff (765 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henning Rudolf Adolf Karl von Holtzendorff (January 9, 1853 – June 7, 1919) was a German admiral during World War I, who became famous for his December
Intellectual (6,785 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
intelligentsia is one of the more significant phenomena of the social history of Germany in the 1830s", and that "three or four theological graduates in ten
Ernst Rüdin (2,802 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ernst Rüdin (April 19, 1874 in St. Gallen – October 22, 1952) was a Swiss-born German psychiatrist, geneticist, eugenicist and Nazi. Rising to prominence
Ernst Rüdin (2,802 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ernst Rüdin (April 19, 1874 in St. Gallen – October 22, 1952) was a Swiss-born German psychiatrist, geneticist, eugenicist and Nazi. Rising to prominence
Foreign Armies East (830 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Foreign Armies East, or Fremde Heere Ost (FHO), was a military intelligence organization of the Oberkommando des Heeres (OKH), the Supreme High Command
Harden–Eulenburg affair (1,882 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Harden–Eulenburg affair, often simply Eulenburg affair, was the controversy in Germany surrounding a series of courts-martial and five civil trials
Union of Persecutees of the Nazi Regime (3,863 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Association of Persecutees of the Nazi Regime/Federation of Antifascists (German: Vereinigung der Verfolgten des Naziregimes – Bund der Antifaschistinnen
1961 F-84 Thunderstreak incident (1,746 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1961 F-84 Thunderstreak incident, occurring on 14 September 1961, was an incident during the Cold War, in which two Republic F-84F Thunderstreak fighter-bombers
Marinestation der Ostsee (376 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Marinestation der Ostsee (Baltic Sea Naval Station) was a command of both the Imperial German Navy, and the Reichsmarine which served as a shore command
Wife selling (18,486 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wife selling is the practice of a husband selling his wife and may include the sale of a female by a party outside a marriage. Wife selling has had numerous
Thurn-und-Taxis Post (1,138 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Thurn-und-Taxis Post (German: [ˈtuːɐ̯n ʊnt ˈtaksɪs ˈpɔst]) was a private company postal service and the successor to the Imperial Reichspost of the
Decision on the Capital of Germany (835 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The capital decision (German: Hauptstadtbeschluss) refers to the decision made by the German Bundestag on 20 June 1991, as a result of German reunification
Western European broadleaf forests (543 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Western European broadleaf forests is an ecoregion in Western Europe, and parts of the Alps. It comprises temperate broadleaf and mixed forests, that
East Prussia (6,730 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University Press, 2012. ISBN 978-0300166606. von Treitschke, Heinrich, History of Germany - vol.1: The Wars of Emancipation, (translated by E & C Paul), Allen
1940 Field Marshal Ceremony (1,832 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1940 Field Marshal Ceremony refers to a promotion ceremony held at the Kroll Opera House in Berlin in which Adolf Hitler promoted twelve generals to
New Economic System (1,748 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The New Economic System (German: Neues Ökonomisches System), officially the New Economic System of Planning and Management, was an economic policy that
Gerhard Hoffmann (1,355 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gerhard Hoffmann (4 August 1880 – 18 June 1945) was a German nuclear physicist. During World War II, he contributed to the German nuclear energy project
German Historical School (521 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is an article about a school of thought in the area of law. For economics, see historical school of economics. The German Historical School of Jurisprudence
Farm (2,973 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1017/S0010417500015334. Blackbourn, David (1998). The Long Nineteenth Century: A History of Germany, 1780–1918. New York: Oxford University Press. Clark, Christopher
Hanau-Münzenberg (3,614 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The County of Hanau-Münzenberg was a territory within the Holy Roman Empire. It emerged when the County of Hanau was divided in 1458, the other part being
Waffen-SS in popular culture (4,483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Waffen-SS, the military branch of the paramilitary SS organisation of Nazi Germany, is often portrayed uncritically or admiringly in popular culture
Schutzmannschaft-Brigade Siegling (1,067 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Schutzmannschaft-Brigade Siegling (also German: Schutzmänner-Brigade Siegling) was a Belarusian Auxiliary Police brigade formed by Nazi Germany in July
Agenda 2010 (1,742 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Agenda 2010 is a series of reforms planned and executed by the German government in the early 2000s, a Social-Democrats/Greens coalition at that time
Prussian State Council (422 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Prussian State Council (German: Preußischer Staatsrat) was the upper chamber of the bicameral legislature of the Free State of Prussia between 1920
Faust (4,181 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Adrian Leverkühn as analog and embodiment of the early 20th-century history of Germany and of Europe. The talented Leverkühn, after contracting venereal
Burgrecht (245 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A Burgrecht (ius burgense, ius civile) was a medieval agreement, most commonly in southern Germany and northern German-speaking Switzerland. It came to
Georg Joos (1,095 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Georg Jakob Christof Joos (25 May 1894 in Bad Urach, German Empire – 20 May 1959 in Munich, West Germany) was a German experimental physicist. He wrote
Kingdom of Prussia (7,516 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
3rd ed. London: English Universities Press, 1964. Atkinson, C. T. A History of Germany, 1715–1815. New York: Barnes & Noble, 1969. Langels, Otto: "Constitutional
Ganerbschaft (822 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A Ganerbschaft (plural: Ganerbschaften in German), according to old German inheritance law, was a joint family estate, mainly land, over which the co-heirs
Guillaume affair (793 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Guillaume affair (German: Guillaume-Affäre) was an espionage scandal in Germany during the Cold War. The scandal revolved around the exposure of an
Glossary of German military terms (13,719 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of words, terms, concepts, and slogans that have been or are used by the German military. Ranks and translations of nicknames for vehicles
Werner Heyde (630 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Werner Heyde (aka Fritz Sawade) (25 April 1902 – 13 February 1964) was a German psychiatrist. He was one of the main organizers of Nazi Germany's T-4 Euthanasia
Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (2,317 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (28 March 1911 in Esslingen am Neckar – 16 December 2000 in Allensbach) was a German physicist. He made contributions to nuclear spectroscopy
Fliegerführer Irak (1,888 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Flyer Command Iraq (German: Fliegerführer Irak) was a unit of the German Air Force (Luftwaffe) sent to Iraq in May 1941 as part of a German mission to
Karl Rapp (707 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Karl Friedrich Rapp (24 September 1882 in Ehingen (Danube) – 26 May 1962 in Locarno) was a German founder and owner of the Rapp Motorenwerke GmbH in Munich
Battle of the Lupia River (78 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of the Lupia River was fought in 11 BCE between a Roman force led by Nero Claudius Drusus and the Sicambri. The Lupia River, now Lippe, flows
Armeeoberkommando (556 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Armeeoberkommando ("Army Higher Command"; AOK) was a command level in the German and Austro-Hungarian armies, especially during the World War I and World
Robert Döpel (2,241 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Georg Robert Döpel (3 December 1895 – 2 December 1982) was a German experimental nuclear physicist. He was a participant in a group known as the "first
Imperial German plans for the invasion of the United States (3,129 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Imperial German plans for the invasion of the United States were ordered by Germany's Kaiser Wilhelm II from 1897 to 1903. He intended not to conquer the
Battle at Pontes Longi (53 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle at Pontes Longi was fought near Bramsche, Germany in 15 AD between the Roman general Aulus Caecina Severus and an alliance of Germanic peoples
Naval regions and districts of the Kriegsmarine (3,156 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Naval regions and districts were the official shore establishment of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II. The Kriegsmarine shore establishment
Oslo Report (3,269 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Oslo Report was one of the most spectacular leaks in the history of military intelligence. Written by German mathematician and physicist Hans Ferdinand
Klaus Clusius (2,076 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Klaus Paul Alfred Clusius (19 March 1903 – 28 May 1963) was a German physical chemist from Breslau (Wrocław), Silesia. During World War II, he worked on
German Army (3,193 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and enlisted Military of Germany portal Bavarian Army Bundeswehr History of Germany during World War II Infantryman of the Future Imperial Army (German
Zeughaus (333 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Museum für Deutsche Geschichte) in the Zeughaus, which presented the history of Germany, especially in the modern era, from a Communist point of view. Today
Aktuelle Kamera (1,244 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aktuelle Kamera ("Current Camera"; aktuell does not mean actual) was the flagship television newscast of Deutscher Fernsehfunk, the state television broadcaster
Karl Wirtz (1,181 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Karl Eugen Julius Wirtz (24 April 1910 – 12 February 1994) was a German nuclear physicist, born in Cologne. He was arrested by the allied British and American
6th Separate Guards Motor Rifle Brigade (618 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 6th Separate Guards Motor Rifle Brigade (Russian: 6-я отдельная гвардейская мотострелковая бригада) was a Soviet Army mechanized infantry brigade,
Spy basket (693 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The spy gondola, spy basket, observation car or sub-cloud car (German: Spähgondel or Spähkorb) was a byproduct of Peilgondel development (a gondola to
Dark Ages (historiography) (5,066 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
period as "the dark ages." If there is a dark age in the literary history of Germany, however, it is the one that follows: the fourteenth and early fifteenth
Food in occupied Germany (2,709 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
American food policy in occupied Germany refers to the food supply policies enacted by the U.S., and to some extent its dependent Allies, in the western
Peasant (2,969 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Second edition. p. 163. ISBN 978-0140247688. Eda Sagarra, A Social History of Germany: 1648–1914 (1977) pp. 140–54 Wedgwood, Hensleigh (1855). "English
Schutzmannschaft Battalion 201 (1,156 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Schutzmannschaft Battalion 201 was a World War II Schutzmannschaft auxiliary police battalion (Schuma) formed by Nazi Germans on October 21, 1941,
Saar statute (500 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Saar Statute was a Franco-West German agreement signed in 1954 which resulted from lengthy diplomatic negotiations between France and West Germany
Hesse (5,978 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
bis 1367 vol. 1 (2013), p. 41. "The Hessians, called, in the early history of Germany, Catti, lived in the present Hessia". The Popular Encyclopedia: Or
David Schwarz (aviation inventor) (2,216 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
David Schwarz (Hungarian: Schwarz Dávid; Croatian: David Švarc, pronounced [dǎʋit ʃʋârt͡s]; 20 December 1850 – 13 January 1897) was a Hungarian aviation
Taninges (207 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sixteenth century. Communes of the Haute-Savoie department Annemasse History of Germany (1945-90) INSEE "Populations légales 2017". INSEE. Retrieved 6 January
Generalissimo (1,295 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 32. ISBN 978-0-674-05471-4. Retrieved 28 February 2017. A short history of Germany. Ernest Flagg Henderson, 1908 Tilly und Wallenstein – ein Vergleich
Adolf Hitler's rise to power (7,852 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
136–145.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Fulbrook, Mary (1991). The Fontana History of Germany: 1918–1990: The Divided Nation. Fontana Press.CS1 maint: ref=harv
United States Constabulary (4,151 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The United States Constabulary was a United States Army military gendarmerie force. From 1946 to 1952, in the aftermath of World War II, it acted as an
German Federal Army (520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Holy Roman Empire Austro-Hungarian Army Treitschke, Heinrich. History of Germany in the Nineteenth Century, vol. 5, p. 344. Franz Herre. Franz Joseph
German Armistice Commission (194 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The German Armistice Commission (Waffenstillstandskommission, WAKO) was created by Article 22 of the Franco-German Armistice, signed on 22 June 1940. The
Wehrmacht (12,037 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hungary Second Spanish Republic Switzerland Related articles History History of Germany during World War II Ranks Heer ranks Kriegsmarine ranks Luftwaffe
Klara Döpel (897 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Klara (Minna) Renate Döpel (née Mannß; 1900 – 6 April 1945 in Leipzig) was a feminist and a German lawyer until 1933. Then she married the German nuclear
Navy League (Germany) (1,119 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Navy League or Fleet Association (German: Deutscher Flottenverein) in Imperial Germany was an interest group formed on April 30, 1898 on initiative
Johannes Aventinus (793 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
authored the 1523 Annals of Bavaria, a valuable record of the early history of Germany. Having studied at Ingolstadt, Vienna, Cracow and Paris, he returned
Ruhrpolen (683 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ruhrpolen (German: [ˈʁuːɐ̯ˌpoːlən], “Ruhr Poles”) is a German umbrella term for the West Slavic peoples (including Masurians, Kashubians, Silesians, and
German–Soviet Commercial Agreement (1940) (6,190 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The 1940 German-Soviet Commercial Agreement (also known as Economic Agreement of February 11, 1940, Between the German Reich and the Union of Soviet Socialist
Klein-Venedig (1,773 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Klein-Venedig (Little Venice) or Welserland (pronunctiation /vɛl·zɛə·læn/) was the most significant territory of the German colonization of the Americas
German Federal Army (520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Holy Roman Empire Austro-Hungarian Army Treitschke, Heinrich. History of Germany in the Nineteenth Century, vol. 5, p. 344. Franz Herre. Franz Joseph
Ruhrpolen (683 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ruhrpolen (German: [ˈʁuːɐ̯ˌpoːlən], “Ruhr Poles”) is a German umbrella term for the West Slavic peoples (including Masurians, Kashubians, Silesians, and
Challenge International de Tourisme 1930 (3,575 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The International Touring Competition in 1930 (French: Challenge International de Tourisme) was the second FAI international touring aircraft contest,
German code breaking in World War II (1,105 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
German code breaking in World War II achieved some notable successes cracking British Naval ciphers until well into the fourth year of the war, but also
Cherusci (1,403 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
for Gaul. Boston: D. R. Godine, 1980. Wilhelm Zimmermann, A Popular History of Germany (New York, 1878) Vol. I Max Ihm, Cherusci. In: Paulys Realencyclopädie
History of the Social Democratic Party of Germany (13,216 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dt. Verl. d. Wissenschaften, 1985. p. 287 Carr, William (1991). A History of Germany: 1815-1990 (4th ed.). United Kingdom: Hodder & Stoughton. pp. 369–370
Battle of the Angrivarian Wall (83 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of the Angrivarian Wall was fought near Porta Westfalica, Germany in 16 AD between the Roman general Germanicus and an alliance of Germanic
Gustav Laabs (792 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gustav Laabs (20 December 1902 – 12 March 1980) was a German SS commander during the Nazi era. During the Second World War, he worked as a gas van operator
Berlin Infantry Brigade (872 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Berlin Infantry Brigade was a British Army brigade-sized garrison based in West Berlin during the Cold War. After the end of World War II, under the
Hans Kopfermann (1,722 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hans Kopfermann (26 April 1895, in Breckenheim near Wiesbaden – 28 January 1963, in Heidelberg) was a German atomic and nuclear physicist. He devoted his
Poles in the Wehrmacht (956 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Following the German invasion of Poland in 1939, some Polish citizens of diverse ethnicities served in the Wehrmacht, in particular citizens from parts
Führer Directive No. 30 (888 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Führer Directive No. 30 (German: Weisung Nr. 30) was a directive issued by German dictator Adolf Hitler during World War II. It ordered German support
County of Hanau (1,569 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The County of Hanau was a territory within the Holy Roman Empire, evolved out of the Lordship of Hanau in 1429. From 1456 to 1642 and from 1685 to 1712
Großer Zapfenstreich (2,154 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Großer Zapfenstreich ("Grand Tattoo") is a military ceremony performed in Germany and Austria. It is similar to the military tattoo ceremony performed
Bielefeld School (1,596 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bielefeld School is a group of German historians based originally at Bielefeld University who promote social history and political history using quantification
War against the potato beetle (1,383 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The war against the potato beetle was a campaign launched in Warsaw Pact countries during the Cold War to eradicate the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa
Mining in the Upper Harz (4,714 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mining in the Upper Harz region of central Germany was a major industry for several centuries, especially for the production of silver, lead, copper, and
Friedrich Gottlob Keller (1,161 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Friedrich Gottlob Keller (born June 27, 1816 in Hainichen, Saxony – died September 8, 1895 in Krippen, Saxony) was a German machinist and inventor, who
Freischar (552 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Freischar was the German name given to an irregular, volunteer military unit that, unlike regular or reserve military forces, participated in a war
Abraham Esau (2,984 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Abraham Esau (7 June 1884 – 12 May 1955) was a German physicist. After receipt of his doctorate from the University of Berlin, Esau worked at Telefunken