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Longer titles found: History of England (disambiguation) (view), Maritime history of England (view), A Child's History of England (view), Military history of England (view), The History of England (Austen) (view), The History of England (Hume) (view), The History of England from the Accession of James the Second (view), Oxford History of England (view), The Agrarian History of England and Wales (view)

searching for History of England 405 found (3346 total)

alternate case: history of England

Attainder (1,296 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

In English criminal law, attainder or attinctura was the metaphorical "stain" or "corruption of blood" which arose from being condemned for a serious capital
Modern English (1,246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Modern English (ME or MnE), also known as New English (NE), as opposed to Middle English and Old English, is the form of the English language spoken since
Bristol slave trade (2,372 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bristol, a port city in south-west England, was involved in the transatlantic slave trade. Bristol's part in the trade was prominent in the 17th and 18th
Victoria County History (2,053 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Victoria History of the Counties of England, commonly known as the Victoria County History or the VCH, is an English history project which began in
Heirloom (362 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In popular usage, an heirloom is something that has been passed down for generations through family members. Examples are antiques or jewelry. The term
Settlement movement (1,495 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The settlement movement was a reformist social movement that began in the 1880s and peaked around the 1920s in England and the United States. Its goal
English law (4,607 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
English law is the common law legal system of England and Wales, comprising mainly criminal law and civil law, each branch having its own courts and procedures
This Is England (1,760 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This Is England is a 2006 British drama film written and directed by Shane Meadows. The story centres on young skinheads in England in 1983. The film illustrates
Demography of England (938 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
trends underlying the numbers. Wrigley and Schofield, "The Population History of England, 1541–1871. A reconstruction.", Harvard University Press, 1981, Table
Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England (1,192 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England provides a listing and classification system for historic parks and
James Granger (1,500 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
print collector. He is now known as the author of the Biographical History of England from Egbert the Great to the Revolution (1769). Granger was an early
William Stubbs (1,552 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Chronicles and Memorials. It is, however, by Stubbs' Constitutional History of England (3 vols., 1874–78) that he is most widely known as a historian. It
Test Act (1,130 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Test Acts were a series of English penal laws that served as a religious test for public office and imposed various civil disabilities on Roman Catholics
The Tudors (5,808 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tudors is a historical fiction television series set primarily in 16th-century England, created and written by Michael Hirst and produced for the American
Spanish Armada (7,929 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Spanish Armada (Spanish: Grande y Felicísima Armada, lit. 'Great and Most Fortunate Navy') was a Habsburg Spanish fleet of 130 ships that sailed from
Anglo-Saxon warfare (2,037 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The period of Anglo-Saxon warfare spans the 5th century AD to the 11th in England. Its technology and tactics resemble those of other European cultural
William Edward Hartpole Lecky (1,304 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
theorist with Whig proclivities. His major work was an eight-volume History of England during the Eighteenth Century. Born at Newtown Park, near Dublin,
Diggers (3,395 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Diggers were a group of Protestant radicals in England, sometimes seen as forerunners of modern anarchism, and also associated with agrarian socialism
English landscape garden (3,655 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The English landscape garden, also called English landscape park or simply the English garden (French: Jardin à l'anglaise, Italian: Giardino all'inglese
Shakespeare garden (2,314 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A Shakespeare garden is a themed garden that cultivates some or all of the 175 plants mentioned in the works of William Shakespeare. In English-speaking
Judge Advocate of the Fleet (506 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Judge Advocate of the Fleet was an appointed civilian judge who was responsible for the supervision and superintendence of the court martial system
Lord Keeper of the Great Seal (468 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, and later of Great Britain, was formerly an officer of the English Crown charged with physical custody of
Wars of Scottish Independence (4,834 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Wars of Scottish Independence were a series of military campaigns fought between the Kingdom of Scotland and the Kingdom of England in the late 13th
Window tax (1,064 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Window tax was a property tax based on the number of windows in a house. It was a significant social, cultural, and architectural force in England, France
Historic counties of England (6,870 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The historic counties of England are areas that were established for administration by the Normans, in many cases based on earlier kingdoms and shires
Wolf Hall (miniseries) (1,960 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Wolf Hall is a British television serial first broadcast on BBC Two in January 2015. The six-part series is an adaptation of two of Hilary Mantel's novels
Rights of Englishmen (1,215 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The "rights of Englishmen" are the perceived traditional rights of English subjects and later English speaking subjects of the British crown. In the 18th
The White Princess (miniseries) (1,819 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The White Princess is a historical drama television miniseries developed for Starz. It is based on Philippa Gregory's 2013 novel of the same name and,
George IV (6,781 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A History of England and the British Empire, Vol. 4. The MacMillan Company. p. 81. Parissien, pp. 209–224 Innes, Arthur Donald (1915). A History of England
The Spanish Princess (2,130 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Spanish Princess is a historical drama television limited series developed by Emma Frost and Matthew Graham for Starz. Based on the novels The Constant
Hue and cry (647 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In common law, a hue and cry is a process by which bystanders are summoned to assist in the apprehension of a criminal who has been witnessed in the act
Castle Howard (1,981 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Castle Howard is a stately home in North Yorkshire, England, within the civil parish of Henderskelfe, located 15 miles (24 km) north of York. It is a private
The Condition of the Working Class in England (1,526 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Condition of the Working Class in England (German: Die Lage der arbeitenden Klasse in England) is an 1845 book by the German philosopher Friedrich
Harewood House (1,869 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Harewood House (/ˈhɑːrwʊd/ HAR-wuud, /ˈhɛər-/ HAIR-) is a country house in Harewood, West Yorkshire, England. Designed by architects John Carr and Robert
Anglo-Persian capture of Ormuz (554 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Capture of Ormuz (Persian: بازپس گیری هرمز) was a combined Anglo-Persian expedition that successfully captured the Portuguese garrison at Hormuz Island
Capability Brown (3,740 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lancelot Brown (born c. 1715–16, baptised 30 August 1716 – 6 February 1783), more commonly known as Capability Brown, was an English landscape architect
4th Parliament of King James I (515 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 63. Cobbett 1806, p. 1506. Cobbett, W. (1806), The Parliamentary History of England, I, p. 1506 Coke, Sir Edward (1680), The third part of the Institutes
The Masque of Anarchy (2,137 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Masque of Anarchy (or The Mask of Anarchy) is a British political poem written in 1819 (see 1819 in poetry) by Percy Bysshe Shelley following the Peterloo
Witchcraft Acts (1,378 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland there has historically been a succession of Witchcraft Acts governing witchcraft and providing penalties for its
Blenheim Palace (7,927 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Blenheim Palace. Oxford: Alden Press. Halliday, E. E. (1967). Cultural History of England. London: Thames & Hudson. Harlin, Robert (1969). Historic Houses.
The White Queen (miniseries) (3,831 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The White Queen is a British historical drama television miniseries developed for BBC One. It is based on Philippa Gregory's historical novel series The
Postage stamps and postal history of Great Britain (3,499 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Postage stamps and postal history of Great Britain surveys postal history from the United Kingdom and the postage stamps issued by that country and its
Gertrude Jekyll (1,578 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gertrude Jekyll (/ˈdʒiːkəl/ JEE-kəl; 29 November 1843 – 8 December 1932) was a British horticulturist, garden designer, craftswoman, photographer, writer
Doctors' Commons (994 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Doctors' Commons, also called the College of Civilians, was a society of lawyers practising civil law in London. Like the Inns of Court of the common lawyers
Levant Company (3,315 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Levant Company was an English chartered company formed in 1592. Elizabeth I of England approved its initial charter on 11 September 1592 when the Venice
Henry of Huntingdon (1,923 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Lincoln, was a 12th-century English historian, the author of a history of England, the Historia Anglorum, "the most important Anglo-Norman historian
Company of Merchant Adventurers of London (1,446 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
overseas traders, 1550-1653 (Verso, 2003). E. Lipson, The Economic History of England ((1956), 2;196-269. "Merchant Adventurers" in Encyclopædia Britannica
Court of King's Bench (England) (4,053 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Court of King's Bench, formally known as The Court of the King Before the King Himself, was a court of common law in the English legal system. Created
English units (4,392 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
English units are the units of measurement used in England up to 1826 (when they were replaced by Imperial units), which evolved as a combination of the
Socage (513 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Socage (/ˈsɒkɪdʒ/) was one of the feudal duties and hence land tenure forms in the feudal system. A farmer, for example, held the land in exchange for
Thomas Chatterton (4,232 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Chatterton (20 November 1752 – 24 August 1770) was an English poet whose precocious talents ended in suicide at age 17. He was an influence on Romantic
Salutary neglect (838 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In American history, salutary neglect was the British Crown policy of avoiding strict enforcement of parliamentary laws, especially trade laws, as long
Petworth House (1,811 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Petworth House in the parish of Petworth, West Sussex, England, is a late 17th-century Grade I listed country house, rebuilt in 1688 by Charles Seymour
Useless Parliament (699 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Useless Parliament was the first Parliament of England of the reign of King Charles I, sitting only from June until August 1625. It gained its name
1066 and All That (1,927 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1066 and All That: A Memorable History of England, comprising all the parts you can remember, including 103 Good Things, 5 Bad Kings and 2 Genuine Dates
Vice admiralty court (1,962 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vice Admiralty Courts were juryless courts located in British colonies that were granted jurisdiction over local legal matters related to maritime activities
James Anthony Froude (5,250 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
history, becoming one of the best known historians of his time for his History of England from the Fall of Wolsey to the Defeat of the Spanish Armada. Inspired
Sowley Pond (1,054 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sowley Pond is a 49.3-hectare (122-acre) biological Site of Special Scientific Interest east of Lymington in Hampshire. It is part of Solent and Southampton
Bury St Edmunds witch trials (2,164 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bury St Edmunds witch trials were a series of trials conducted intermittently between the years 1599 and 1694 in the town of Bury St Edmunds in Suffolk
Bury St Edmunds witch trials (2,164 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bury St Edmunds witch trials were a series of trials conducted intermittently between the years 1599 and 1694 in the town of Bury St Edmunds in Suffolk
Court of Common Pleas (England) (4,426 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Court of Common Pleas, or Common Bench, was a common law court in the English legal system that covered "common pleas"; actions between subject and
The Great Transformation (book) (2,450 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Great Transformation is a book by Karl Polanyi, a Hungarian-American political economist. First published in 1944 by Farrar & Rinehart, it deals with
Edward Potts Cheyney (144 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
History of England (1901) Short History of England (1904) European Background of American History (1904) Readings in English History (1908) A History
Financial costs of the American Revolutionary War (2,566 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The American Revolutionary War inflicted great financial costs on all of the combatants, including the United States, France, Spain and the Kingdom of
Battle of Dunbar (1650) (8,495 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
In John Kenyon & Jane Ohlmeyer (eds.). The Civil Wars: A Military History of England, Scotland and Ireland 1638–1660. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Generalissimo (1,295 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Armies Rapin de Thoyras (M., Paul) (1745). Nicholas Tindal (ed.). The History of England. Volume IV, part 1 (French original: Histoire d'Angleterre, 1724–27)
Instrument of Government (865 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Instrument of Government was a constitution of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland. Drafted by Major-General John Lambert in 1653, it
Royal Commission into the Operation of the Poor Laws 1832 (650 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1832 Royal Commission into the Operation of the Poor Laws was a group set up to decide how to change the Poor Law systems in England and Wales. The
Witches of Warboys (1,857 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Witches of Warboys were Alice Samuel and her family, who were accused of, and executed for witchcraft between 1589 and 1593 in the village of Warboys
Hide (unit) (2,782 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Obligation in Medieval England. pp.18-21 E. Lipson, The Economic History of England, 12th ed., vol. 1 p. 16 Faith (1997) p.91 Bailey, p. 5 Stenton, p
Breach of promise (2,429 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Breach of promise is a common law tort, abolished in many jurisdictions. It was also called breach of contract to marry, and the remedy awarded was known
Poplar Rates Rebellion (1,119 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Poplar Rates Rebellion, or Poplar Rates Revolt, was a tax protest that took place in Poplar, London, England, in 1921. It was led by George Lansbury
Peter Ackroyd (1,984 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Under 2011 The History of England, v.1 Foundation 2012 Wilkie Collins (Penguin Classics' "Brief Lives" series) 2012 The History of England, v.2 Tudors 2014
Stourhead (1,886 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Stourhead (/ˈstaʊərˌhɛd/) is a 1,072-hectare (2,650-acre) estate at the source of the River Stour in the southwest of the English county of Wiltshire,
Navigation Acts (7,092 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Navigation Acts, or more broadly the Acts of Trade and Navigation, was a long series of English laws that developed, promoted, and regulated English
Labouchere Amendment (2,285 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Section 11 of the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1885, commonly known as the Labouchere Amendment, made "gross indecency" a crime in the United Kingdom. In
Commentaries on the Laws of England (3,029 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Commentaries on the Laws of England are an influential 18th-century treatise on the common law of England by Sir William Blackstone, originally published
Steelyard (1,292 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 51°30′41″N 0°05′26″W / 51.51139°N 0.09056°W / 51.51139; -0.09056 The Steelyard, from the Middle Low German Stalhof, was the main trading
Staple right (505 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The staple right, also translated stacking right or storage right, both from the Dutch stapelrecht, was a medieval right accorded to certain ports, the
Big Steamers (603 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
twenty-three poems written specially for C. R. L. Fletcher's "A School History of England". It appears in the last chapter of the book. It is intended for children
Humphry Repton (3,002 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Humphry Repton (21 April 1752 – 24 March 1818) was the last great English landscape designer of the eighteenth century, often regarded as the successor
Persian–Portuguese War (1,036 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Persian–Portuguese war took place from 1507 to 1622 and involved the Portuguese Empire and the Kingdom of Ormus, its vassal, on one side, and the Safavid
Battle of Cartagena de Indias (10,473 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
leave a balance of some 2600 for transport crews. Hume, David. The History of England, London, 1825, pp. 108–13, "The conjoined squadrons consisted of nine
Architecture of England (4,644 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The architecture of England is the architecture of modern England and in the historic Kingdom of England. It often includes buildings created under English
Chatsworth House (10,764 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chatsworth House is a stately home in Derbyshire, England, in the Derbyshire Dales 3.5 miles (5.6 km) north-east of Bakewell and 9 miles (14 km) west of
Inquisition post mortem (2,349 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
An Inquisition post mortem (abbreviated to Inq.p.m. or i.p.m., and formerly known as an escheat) (Latin, meaning "(inquisition) after death") is an English
Law French (1,430 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Law French (Old French: Droit Français, Norman: Louai Français, Middle English: Lawe Frensch) is an archaic language originally based on Old Norman and
Hatch bell foundry (2,053 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Hatch bell foundry at Ulcombe, near Maidstone, in Kent, England, was operated by three generations of the Hatch family from 1581 or earlier until 1664
Valor Ecclesiasticus (727 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Valor Ecclesiasticus (Latin: "church valuation") was a survey of the finances of the church in England, Wales and English controlled parts of Ireland
Attachment (law) (520 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Attachment is a legal process by which a court of law, at the request of a creditor, designates specific property owned by the debtor to be transferred
Charles Oman (1,098 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
) The History of England from the Accession of Richard II. to the Death of Richard III. (1377–1485), Vol. IV of The Political History of England (1906)
Anglo-Saxon military organization (1,674 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anglo-Saxon military organisation is difficult to analyse because there are many conflicting records and opinions as to the precise occurrences and procedures
Soke (legal) (903 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
(11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 353. G. M. Trevelyan, History of England (London 1926) p. 92 Emma Day (2011), SOKEMEN AND FREEMEN IN LATE ANGLO-SAXON
English Reformation Parliament (753 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The English Reformation Parliament, which sat from 3 November 1529 to 14 April 1536, was the English Parliament that passed the major pieces of legislation
Mortmain (779 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mortmain (/ˈmɔːrtmeɪn/) is the perpetual, inalienable ownership of real estate by a corporation or legal institution; the term is usually used in the context
Oxford Parliament (1681) (252 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Oxford Parliament, also known as the Third Exclusion Parliament, was an English Parliament assembled in the city of Oxford for one week from 21 March
History of English criminal law (1,478 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The first signs of the modern distinction between criminal and civil proceedings were during the Norman conquest of England in 1066. The earliest criminal
Chinaman (porcelain) (1,153 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William BELOE, China-Man, Market-Place, Norwich Has just received from the India Company's Sale a large and regular Assortment of useful and ornamental
Chiswick House (6,776 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chiswick House is a Palladian villa in Chiswick, in the west of London, England. A "glorious" example of Neo-Palladian architecture in London, the house
Slavery at common law (5,271 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Slavery at common law in former colonies of the British Empire developed slowly over centuries, and was characterised by inconsistent decisions and varying
Home Children (2,865 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Home Children was the child migration scheme founded by Annie MacPherson in 1869, under which more than 100,000 children were sent from the United Kingdom
Badminton House (811 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Badminton House is a large country house and Grade I Listed Building in Badminton, Gloucestershire, England, and has been the principal seat of the Dukes
Attorney at law (382 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
States Attorneys in South Africa A. H. Manchester, A Modern Legal History of England and Wales, 1750–1850, Butterworths: London, 1980. Supreme Court of
Special pleader (224 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A special pleader was a historical legal occupation. The practitioner, or "special pleader" in English law specialised in drafting "pleadings", in modern
Society of Merchant Venturers (2,578 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Society of Merchant Venturers is a charitable organisation in the English city of Bristol. The society can be traced back to a 13th-century guild which
Pipe rolls (5,844 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pauline (1989). Unification and Conquest: A Political and Social History of England in the Tenth and Eleventh Centuries. London: Edward Arnold. ISBN 0-7131-6532-4
Doctrine of worthier title (1,152 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In the common law of England, the doctrine of worthier title was a legal doctrine that preferred taking title to real estate by descent over taking title
Coverture (4,474 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coverture (sometimes spelled couverture) was a legal doctrine whereby, upon marriage, a woman's legal rights and obligations were subsumed by those of
Admiral (Royal Navy) (1,801 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Houbraken, Jacobus; Thoyras, Paul de Rapin; Vertue, George (1747). The History of England, A List of Admirals of England, 1228–1745. J. and P. Knapton. p. 270
John Fielding (467 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir John Fielding (16 September 1721 – 4 September 1780) was a notable English magistrate and social reformer of the 18th century. He was also the younger
Feudal aid (1,163 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Feudal aid is the legal term for one of the financial duties required of a feudal tenant or vassal to his lord. Variations on the feudal aid were collected
Claremont Landscape Garden (372 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Claremont Landscape Garden, just outside Esher, Surrey, England, is one of the earliest surviving gardens of its kind of landscape design, the English
Selden Society (948 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Selden Society is a learned society and registered charity concerned with the study of English legal history. It functions primarily as a text publication
Laurence Echard (464 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(c. 1670–1730) was an English historian and clergyman. He wrote a History of England that was a standard work in its time. He was the son of the Rev. Thomas
Royal Hospital School (3,149 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Royal Hospital School (usually shortened as "RHS" and historically nicknamed "The Cradle of the Navy") is a British co-educational independent day
Cromwell's Other House (2,082 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
48. Cobbett, William, ed. (January 1808), Cobbett's parliamentary history of England, from the Norman Conquest, in 1066 to the year, 1803: from which last-mentioned
Merry England (4,566 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Greenblatt, Will in the World (London 2005) pp. 39–40 G. M. Trevelyan, History of England (London 1926) pp. 242, 283 L. Marcus, The Politics of Mirth (London
Angles (2,233 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation], Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England: A Revised Translation, London: George Bell & Sons. Cornelius Tacitus
Stannary law (1,553 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The stannary law (derived from the Latin: stannum for tin) is the body of English law that governs tin mining in Devon and Cornwall; although no longer
Indemnity and Oblivion Act (2,080 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Indemnity and Oblivion Act 1660 is an Act of the Parliament of England (12 Cha. II c. 11), the long title of which is "An Act of Free and General Pardon
Brown Dog affair (7,733 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Brown Dog affair was a political controversy about vivisection that raged in England from 1903 until 1910. It involved the infiltration by Swedish
Court of Exchequer Chamber (259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Court of Exchequer Chamber was an English appellate court for common law civil actions before the reforms of the Judicature Acts of 1873–1875. It originated
Catharine Macaulay (3,704 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
educated privately at home by a governess. In the first volume of her History of England, Macaulay claimed that from an early age she was a prolific reader
David Kynaston (798 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in Aldershot) is an English historian specialising in the social history of England. Kynaston was educated at Wellington College, Berkshire and New College
2nd Spanish Armada (2,613 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 2nd Spanish Armada also known as the Spanish Armada of 1596 was a naval operation that took place during the Anglo–Spanish War. Another invasion of
Convention of Alessandria (1,893 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Marshall and Co. OCLC 862126804. Bright, James Franck (1837). A History of England. E.P. Dutton. Chandler, David (1973) [1966]. The Campaigns of Napoleon
Loyal Parliament (1,519 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Loyal Parliament was the only Parliament of England of King James II, in theory continuing from May 1685 to July 1687, but in practice sitting during
Defence Regulation 18B (2,344 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Defence Regulation 18B, often referred to as simply 18B, was one of the Defence Regulations used by the British Government during the Second World War
Humanitarianism (2,576 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Trevelyan, G. M., Illustrated History of England, Longmans, Green and Co., 1956 Trevelyan, G. M.Illustrated Social History of England, Pelican, 1964 Toynbee
Roundhead (1,096 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 118, 635. Worden 2009, p. 4. Macaulay, Thomas Babington (1856). The History of England from the Accession of James II. 1. New York: Harper & Brothers. p
Oliver Cromwell (16,167 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
documents (Noble 1784, pp. 11–13) Dickens, Charles (1854). A Child's History of England volume 3. Bradbury and Evans. p. 239. Morrill, John (2004). "Cromwell
Husband selling (2,299 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Husband selling was the historical practice of: a wife selling a husband, generally to a new wife; a slave-master or master's estate selling the husband
English Reports (336 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The English Reports is a collection of judgments of the higher English Courts between 1220 and 1866. The reports are a selection of most nominate reports
Catherine of Aragon (8,315 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 462–464. Williams 1971, p. 124. Lehman 2011, p. 293. Sharon Turner, The History of England from the Earliest Period to the Death of Elizabeth (Longman, Rees
First Four Ships (714 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The First Four Ships refers to the four sailing vessels chartered by the Canterbury Association which left Plymouth, England, in September 1850 to transport
Bowood House (1,280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bowood is a grade I listed Georgian country house with interiors by Robert Adam and a garden designed by Lancelot "Capability" Brown. It is adjacent to
John Leland (antiquary) (4,946 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
and introduced the county as the basic unit for studying the local history of England, an idea that has been influential ever since. Most evidence for Leland's
Revolution Controversy (740 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Revolution Controversy was a British debate over the French Revolution, lasting from 1789 through 1795. A pamphlet war began in earnest after the publication
Thegn (1,246 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Stubbs, William (1875). Constitutional History of England, Volume I (2015 ed.). Palala Press. ISBN 978-1340811013.CS1 maint:
Court for Crown Cases Reserved (209 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Court for Crown Cases Reserved was an English appellate court for criminal cases established in 1848 to hear references from the trial judge. It did
Geoffrey Jellicoe (877 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Geoffrey Allan Jellicoe RA VMH (8 October 1900 – 17 July 1996) was an English architect, town planner, landscape architect, garden designer, lecturer
Queen Anne's Bounty (764 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Queen Anne's Bounty was a scheme established in 1704 to augment the incomes of the poorer clergy of the Church of England, and by extension the organisation
Third English Civil War (6,471 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
In John Kenyon & Jane Ohlmeyer (eds.). The Civil Wars: A Military History of England, Scotland and Ireland 1638–1660. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Manchester Martyrs (4,425 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Manchester Martyrs— William Philip Allen, Michael Larkin, and Michael O'Brien—were three men executed for the murder of a police officer in Manchester
Declaration of Breda (1,182 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Hallam, Henry (1859). The constitutional history of England, from the accession of Henry VII. to the death of George II. Harper
John Oldmixon (478 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
very biased, are Oldmixon's works on English history. His Critical history of England (1724-1726) contains attacks on Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon
Azincourt (695 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
23 John Cassell's Illustrated History of England, vol. 1 (1857), p. 532. John Cassell's Illustrated History of England, vol. 1 (1857), p. 534. "Azincourt
Life at the Bottom (2,313 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass is a collection of essays written by British writer, doctor, and psychiatrist Theodore Dalrymple
Spanish Company (1,482 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Spanish Company was an English chartered company or corporate body established in 1530, and 1577, confirmed in 1604, and re-established in 1605 as
G. M. Trevelyan (2,457 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
positive force, and less insistent that progress was inevitable. In History of England (1926), he searched for the deepest meaning of English history. Cannadine
Puck of Pook's Hill (1,188 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
archaeological imagination that, in fragments, delivers a look at the history of England, climaxing with the signing of Magna Carta. Puck calmly concludes
Raphael Holinshed (1,161 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
known as Holinshed's Chronicles. It was the "first complete printed history of England composed as a continuous narrative". The Holinshed Chronicles was
Lady Godiva (3,267 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
volume 1, p.148. Grafton, Richard (1809). Grafton's chronicle, or history of England: to which is added his table of the bailiffs, sheriffs and mayors
Intolerable Acts (1,858 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
quote in context, see William Cobbett et al., eds., The Parliamentary History of England: From the Earliest Period to the Year 1803 (London, 1813) 17:1280–1281
Goldney Hall (1,855 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Goldney Hall is a self-catered hall of residence in the University of Bristol. It is one of three in the Clifton area of Bristol, England. The hall occupies
Merchants of the Staple (664 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Company of Merchants of the Staple of England, the Merchants of the Staple, also known as the Merchant Staplers, is an English company incorporated
Elizabeth Woodville (4,258 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Divorced, Beheaded, Survived, xviii, Perseus Books, 1995 A Complete History of England with the Lives of all the Kings and Queens thereof; London, 1706.
Taxatio Ecclesiastica (883 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Taxatio Ecclesiastica, often referred to as the Taxatio Nicholai or just the Taxatio, compiled in 1291–92 under the order of Pope Nicholas IV, is a
Euston Hall (913 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Euston Hall is a country house, with park by William Kent and Capability Brown, located in Euston, a small village in Suffolk located just south of Thetford
Euston Hall (913 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Euston Hall is a country house, with park by William Kent and Capability Brown, located in Euston, a small village in Suffolk located just south of Thetford
Taxatio Ecclesiastica (883 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Taxatio Ecclesiastica, often referred to as the Taxatio Nicholai or just the Taxatio, compiled in 1291–92 under the order of Pope Nicholas IV, is a
Dissenter (418 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(disagrees) in matters of opinion, belief, etc. In the social and religious history of England and Wales, and, by extension, Ireland, however, it refers particularly
Lunacy Act 1845 (864 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Lunacy/Lunatics Act 1845 (8 & 9 Vict., c. 100) and the County Asylums Act 1845 formed mental health law in England and Wales from 1845 to 1890. The
The Staple (614 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In European historiography, the term "staple" refers to the entire medieval system of trade and its taxation; its French equivalent is étape, and its German
Subpoena (1,538 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
p. 1160 (8th ed. 1976). Curtis, John (1860). A School and College History of England. Simpkin, Marshall and Co. p. 139. Retrieved 1 May 2017. Lowery v
J.L. Thompson and Sons (1,275 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
J.L. Thompson and Sons was a shipyard on the River Wear, Sunderland, which produced ships from the mid-18th century until the 1980s. The world-famous Liberty
The Beauties of England and Wales (807 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1801–1815) is a series of books describing the topography and local history of England and Wales. Produced by a variety of London publishers, the work appeared
Calvin's Case (1,421 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Calvin's Case (1608), 77 ER 377, (1608) Co Rep 1a, also known as the Case of the Postnati, was a 1608 English legal decision establishing that a child
Main Plot (342 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Main Plot was an alleged conspiracy of July 1603 by English courtiers to remove King James I from the English throne and to replace him with his cousin
James VI and I (12,038 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University Press, ISBN 0-8223-1385-5. Ackroyd, Peter (2014), The History of England, Volume III: Civil War, Macmillan, ISBN 978-0-230-70641-5, p. 45;
Hidcote Manor Garden (567 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hidcote Manor Garden is a garden in the United Kingdom, located at the village of Hidcote Bartrim, near Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire. It is one of
Three Witches (4,675 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
his demise. Their origin lies in Holinshed's Chronicles (1587), a history of England, Scotland and Ireland. Other possible sources, aside from Shakespeare's
Board of Ordnance (8,210 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Board of Ordnance was a British government body. Established in the Tudor period, it had its headquarters in the Tower of London. Its primary responsibilities
Lindisfarne (6,851 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
[first published 1961], The Fifteenth Century, 1399–1485, The Oxford History of England, VI, OUP, ISBN 0-19-821714-5 James, Alan G. (2019), "A Guide to the
Engagement controversy (250 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Engagement Controversy was a debate in England from 1649–1652 regarding loyalty to the new regime after Pride's Purge and the execution of Charles
Felo de se (866 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Felo de se, Latin for "felon of him- or herself", was a concept applied against the personal estates (assets) of adults who ended their own lives. Early
Eata of Hexham (746 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Wayback Machine Bede Ecclesiastical History of England Chapter 25 Bede Ecclesiastical History of England Chapter 26 Odden, Per Einer. "Den hellige
London theatre closure 1642 (319 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In September 1642, just after the First English Civil War had begun, the Long Parliament ordered the closure of all London theatres. The order cited the
John Colepeper, 1st Baron Colepeper (3,350 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Internet Archive). Gardiner, History of England, IX: 1639-1641 (1884), p. 287 (Internet Archive). Gardiner, History of England, X: 1641-1642, pp. 14-16 (Internet
William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley (5,237 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cecil is almost indistinguishable from that of Elizabeth and from the history of England." Cecil set as the main goal of English policy the creation of a united
Ecclesiastical History of the English People (6,394 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
books begins with some geographical background and then sketches the history of England, beginning with Caesar's invasion in 55 BC. A brief account of Christianity
John Eachard (420 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
which were somewhat exaggerated, were largely used by Macaulay in his History of England. He gave amusing illustrations of the absurdity and poverty of the
Samuel Rawson Gardiner (2,254 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Firth as The Last Years of the Protectorate (1909). The series is History of England from the Accession of James I to the Outbreak of the Civil War, 1603–1642
Thomason Collection of Civil War Tracts (958 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
primary source for the political, religious, military, and social history of England during the final years of the reign of King Charles I, the English
Maxims of equity (4,149 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maxims of equity are legal maxims that serve as a set of general principles or rules which are said to govern the way in which equity operates. They tend
Peter Hunter Blair (238 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Roman Britain and Early England: 55 B.C. – A.D. 871. Norton Library History of England. Edinburgh & New York: Nelson, W. W. Norton & Company. 1963. ISBN 0-351-15318-7
Scarborough Maritime Heritage Centre (538 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Scarborough Maritime Heritage Centre (SMHC), is a museum situated in Scarborough, North Yorkshire, England, and opened on 12 December 2009. The centre
Chief Butler of England (519 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Chief Butler of England is an office of Grand Sergeanty associated with the feudal Manor of Kenninghall in Norfolk. The office requires service to
Throckmorton Plot (793 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1583 Throckmorton Plot was one of a series of attempts by English Roman Catholics to depose Elizabeth I of England and replace her with Mary, Queen
Manorial roll (241 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A manorial roll or court roll is the roll or record kept of the activities of a manorial court, in particular containing entries relating to the rents
Frankpledge (1,426 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and for the lords to grow more powerful. — Albert F. Pollard, The History of England: A Study in Political Evolution The tithing eventually became a territorial
Court of Criminal Appeal (England and Wales) (396 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Court of Criminal Appeal was an English appellate court for criminal cases established by the Criminal Appeal Act 1907. It superseded the Court for
Cavalier (1,569 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University Press. p. 3.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Hume, David (1841). The History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution 1688. V. .T.
Æthelred the Unready (6,291 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
decided not to risk it in a general action. In Stenton's view: "The history of England in the next generation was really determined between 1009 and 1012
Our Island Story (268 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Our Island Story: A Child's History of England, published abroad as An Island Story: A Child's History of England, is a book by Henrietta Elizabeth Marshall
February 12 (4,182 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Myanmar) Youth Day (Venezuela) Sir Edward Shepherd Creasy (1870). History of England from the Earliest to the Present Time: The history during the early
Battle of Pencon (315 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Pencon or Pencoed was a battle won by the Britons (modern Welsh), possibly against the Mercians or against themselves, around the year 720
Richard III of England (17,712 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(link) Buck, George (1706). "The Life of King Richard III". A Complete History of England. Vol. 1. London: Brab Aylmer et al. pp. 514–577. Retrieved 7 December
The Wash (2,378 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
L. Poole (1955). Domesday Book to Magna Carta, 1087-1216. Oxford History of England. p. 485. ISBN 0-19-821707-2. Neil Walker; Thomas Craddock (1849).
Manorial roll (241 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A manorial roll or court roll is the roll or record kept of the activities of a manorial court, in particular containing entries relating to the rents
Trial of Penenden Heath (996 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The trial of Penenden Heath occurred in the decade after the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, probably in 1076, and involved a dispute between Odo,
Junius (2,158 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Junius was the pseudonym of a writer who contributed a series of letters to the Public Advertiser, from 21 January 1769 to 21 January 1772. The signature
Our Island Story (268 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Our Island Story: A Child's History of England, published abroad as An Island Story: A Child's History of England, is a book by Henrietta Elizabeth Marshall
Joan of Arc (11,902 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Middle Ages and During the Renaissance Period. Lingard, John. The History of England. Perroy, Edouard (1965). The Hundred Years War. trans. W.B. Wells
Henry VIII (16,258 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
April 2013. Elton 1977, pp. 110–112 Woodward, Llewellyn (1965). A History Of England. London: Methuen & Co Ltd. p. 73. Pollard 1905, pp. 230–238 Bernard
Dialogus de Scaccario (686 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Dialogus de Scaccario, or Dialogue concerning the Exchequer, is a mediaeval treatise on the practice of the English Exchequer written in the late 12th
Lords Temporal (833 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-1241049874. Cobbett, William (1803). Cobbett's Parliamentary history of England. From the Norman conquest, in 1066. To the year, 1803. London: T.C
Cabal ministry (1,475 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Cabal ministry or the CABAL /kæˈbɑːl/ refers to a group of high councillors of King Charles II of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1668 to c. 1674
Nisi prius (633 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nisi prius (/ˈnaɪsaɪ ˈpraɪəs/) is a historical term in English law. In the 19th century, it came to be used to denote generally all legal actions tried
Country Party (Britain) (1,291 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
In Britain in the period from the 1680s to the 1740s, and especially under the Walpole ministry from 1730 to 1743, the country Party was a coalition of
Robert of Bellême, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury (3,802 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
England and Normandy, Vol. II, trans. Thomas Forester (London: Henry G. Bohn, 1854), p. 457 Ordericus Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and
Whigs (British political party) (5,572 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
often joked that "the first Whig was the Devil". In his six-volume history of England, David Hume wrote: The court party reproached their antagonists with
Corn Laws (5,098 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 0-00-686366-3 Ensor, Robert (1936). England, 1870–1914, The Oxford History of England. Oxford: Clarendon Press. ISBN 0-19-821705-6.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
Anne Boleyn (13,206 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
provided here. William Hickman Smith Aubrey, The National and Domestic History of England (1867), p. 471. Ives 2005, p. 358. sfn error: multiple targets (2×):
Richard II of England (7,516 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
64. McKisack (1959), p. 491. Gardiner, Samuel R. (1916), Student's History of England from the Earliest Times to the Death of King Edward VII, vol. I.:
Embracery (506 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Embracery is the attempt to influence a juror corruptly to give his or her verdict in favour of one side or the other in a trial, by promise, persuasions
John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford (2,173 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
on 12 June 2018.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Brougham, Henry (1855). History of England and France under the House of Lancaster (2nd ed.). London: John Murray
Wife selling (English custom) (6,710 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Wife selling in England was a way of ending an unsatisfactory marriage by mutual agreement that probably began in the late 17th century, when divorce was
Institutes of the Lawes of England (2,573 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Institutes of the Lawes of England are a series of legal treatises written by Sir Edward Coke. They were first published, in stages, between 1628 and
Henry V of England (4,232 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cadency in the British Royal Family Fraser, Antonia (2000). A Royal History of England – The Wars of the Roses I. Los Angeles & Berkeley: University of California
Geology of Ireland (1,834 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
parameter (link) Hill, Jon; Davis, Katie (November 2007). "Precambrian History of England and Wales". GeologyRocks.com. Archived from the original on 7 December
Humble Petition and Advice (474 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Humble Petition and Advice was the second, and last, codified constitution of England after the Instrument of Government. On 23 February 1657, during
Ale (1,949 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
170 read online Hallam, H. E.; Thirsk, Joan (1988). The Agrarian History of England and Wales: Volume 2, 1042-1350. Cambridge University Press. p. 826
Fief (1,711 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bloch. Feudalism, 1961, p. 106. William Stubbs. The Constitutional History of England (3 volumes), 2nd edition 1875–1878, Vol. 1, p. 251, n. 1 Archibald
Robert Carr, 1st Earl of Somerset (1,490 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Denmark, p 136. Cassell's Illustrated History of England (1865), vol 3, p.59 Cassell's Illustrated History of England (1865), vol 3, p.59 trove.nla.gov
Unionism in England (950 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In England, Unionism is a political ideology which favours the continuation of some form of political union between England and the other countries of
Serfdom (4,938 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Arthur Birnie. P. 218 Craik, George Lillie (1846). "The Pictorial History of England: Being a History of the People, as Well as ... - George Lillie Craik
Clerk of the Peace (1,921 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A clerk of the peace held an office in England and Wales whose responsibility was the records of the quarter sessions and the framing of presentments and
Peace of Utrecht (2,867 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Modern World 2nd ed. 1961, p. 234. G.M. Trevelyan, A shortened history of England (1942) p 363. The staunch Tory Strafford was hauled before a committee
Nottingham Corporation Gas Department (502 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Nottingham Corporation Gas Department was responsible for the production and supply of coal gas in Nottingham, England, from 1874 to 1947.[citation
Piano nobile (538 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University Press. ISBN 0-300-02273-5. Halliday, E. E. (1967). Cultural History of England. London: Thames and Hudson. Harris, John; de Bellaigue, Geoffrey;
Flixton House (283 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Flixton House was built in 1806 by the Wright family, who had become wealthy land owners in Flixton. Flixton House would probably have been quite unremarkable
Siraj ud-Daulah (3,302 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cobbett, William; Hansard, Thomas Curson (1813). The Parliamentary History of England from the Earliest Period to the Year 1803. T.C. Hansard. pp. 449–
Battle of Bannockburn (4,140 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
12 June 2020. Arnold-Foster, Hugh Oakley (1907). "Bannockburn". A History of England from the Landing of Julius Caesar to the Present Day. London, Paris
Mansion (2,182 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University Press. ISBN 0-300-02273-5. Halliday, F. E. (1967). Cultural History of England. London: Thames and Hudson. p. 166. Richard Cobb, pages 77–79, The
Nightwalker statute (176 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nightwalker statutes were English statutes, before modern policing, allowing or requiring night watchmen to arrest those found on the streets and hold
History of the National Health Service (England) (3,716 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The National Health Service in England was created by the National Health Service Act 1946. Responsibility for the NHS in Wales was passed to the Secretary
Garden History Society (268 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Garden History Society was an organisation in the United Kingdom established to study garden history and to protect historic gardens. Since 2015 it
Labour supply (531 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
agrarian history of England and Wales, vol 4: 1500-1640, edited by Joan Thirsk. Also published in Chapters from the Agrarian History of England and Wales
Gilbert Abbott à Beckett (541 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
with Mark Lemon. He is perhaps best known as the author of The Comic History of England (1847–48), The Comic History of Rome (1852) and a Comic Blackstone
List of parliaments of England (3,776 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Curia Regis Rolls, xv, no.2047. (London: 17 vols, 1922–91) M. Paris, History of England since 1235 M. Paris, (1246) Annales Monastici: Burton Annals, p.307
Gilbert Abbott à Beckett (541 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
with Mark Lemon. He is perhaps best known as the author of The Comic History of England (1847–48), The Comic History of Rome (1852) and a Comic Blackstone
Netherlands (25,478 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
III, Harper Bros.: New York, p. 508. Willson, David Harris (1972). History of England, Holt, Rinehart & Winston: New York, p. 294. Ground Warfare: An International
Europe (18,276 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
century, Historyworld Trevelyan, George Macaulay (1988). A shortened history of England. Penguin Books. ISBN 978-0-14-010241-3. Webb, Sidney (1976). History
Livery of seisin (887 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Livery of seisin (/ˈsiːzɪn/) is an archaic legal conveyancing ceremony, formerly practised in feudal England and in other countries following English common
Gold penny (514 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
LVND. The gold penny was not popular. Thomas Carte, in his A general history of England, says that the citizens of London made a representation against them
3rd Spanish Armada (5,536 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 3rd Spanish Armada, also known as the Spanish Armada of 1597, was a major naval event that took place between October and November 1597 as part of
Magna Carta (16,451 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
during the 19th century. The historian William Stubbs's Constitutional History of England, published in the 1870s, formed the high-water mark of this view.
Charles II of England (8,012 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hudson's Bay Company, retrieved 29 April 2017 Hume, David (1778), The History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution in 1688, VIII
Richard I of England (11,907 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 30 March 2012. Stubbs, William (2017). The Constitutional History of England. 1. Miami, Florida: HardPress. pp. 550–551. ASIN B07CN328FF. Curry
Edward IV of England (4,212 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
School of History PHD. Wilkinson, Bertie (1964). Constitutional History of England in the Fifteenth Century (1399–1485): With Illustrative Documents
Feudalism (5,360 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
letterbode, 1( 1870), pp. 189-201. William Stubbs. The Constitutional History of England (3 volumes), 2nd edition 1875–78, Vol. 1, pg. 251, n. 1 Marc Bloch
Accountant general (528 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Accountant general or accountant-general is, or was, the name of a government post in several countries. The office provides financial information, accounting
Francis Drake (8,486 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-1-844-13762-6. Thompson, Edith (1873). Freeman, Edward Augustus (ed.). History of England. Freeman's Historical Course for Schools. New York: Henry Holt and
Bye Plot (1,909 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
away. These trials took place 15–18 November. John Lingard in his History of England attributed the delay to the continued presence in the country of Charles
1742 (2,053 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hogan (Macmillan, 2016) p652 I. S. Leadam, The Political History of England: The history of England from the accession of Anne to the death of George II,
British Army (11,353 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 17 October 2017. Rogers 1968, pp. 207–211. Lord Macaulay The History of England from the accession of James the Second (C.H. Firth ed. 1913) 1:136-38
England national football team (4,637 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Goalkeeper Peter Shilton is the most capped player in the history of England with 125 caps.
John Henry Newman (14,546 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
cardinal, who was an important and controversial figure in the religious history of England in the 19th century. He was known nationally by the mid-1830s, and
Pauline Stafford (386 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
143-67, 217-20. 1989. Unification and conquest. A political and social history of England in the tenth and eleventh centuries. 1985. The East Midlands in the
Mental Health Act 1959 (400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Mental Health Act 1959 was an act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom concerning England and Wales which had, as its main objectives, to abolish
Gilbert Burnet (4,457 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
such that, though he frequently gave offence, he never took it. —History of England, Vol. 2, Ch 7. In J.P. Kenyon's view Burnet's great gifts never quite
Battle of Plassey (7,646 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Parliament, Great Britain; Parliament, Scotland (1813). The Parliamentary history of England from the earliest period to the year 1803, Volume 17. p. 876. ISBN 9780404016500
Newton Park (511 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Newton Park is an 18th-century grade I listed country house in the parish of Newton St Loe, Somerset, England, situated 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Bath.
Jackfield (1,407 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jackfield is a village in Shropshire, England, lying on the south bank of River Severn in the Ironbridge Gorge, downstream from Ironbridge. Like many of
American Revolutionary War (32,647 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Hartpole (1892). A History of England in the Eighteenth Century. 3. London: Longmans, Green. —— (1891). A History of England. 4. pp. 70–78. Lefkowitz
Captain Swing (633 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Captain Swing" was the name appended to several threatening letters during the rural English Swing Riots of 1830, when labourers rioted over the introduction
Arrestable offence (1,213 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arrestable offence is a legal term now obsolete in English law and the legal system of Northern Ireland, but still used in the legal system of the Republic
Life peer (2,960 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
October 2009 Farnborough, T. E. May, 1st Baron (1896), Constitutional History of England since the Accession of George the Third (11th ed.), London: Longmans
Patrick Collinson (1,199 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
described himself as "an early modernist with a prime interest in the history of England in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries." Collinson was born in
Mansion House, London (1,568 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
contrast to his own 19th, century). William Edward Hartpole Lecky in his History of England during the Eighteenth Century (1878) describes the funding of the
Black Act 1723 (1,994 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Black Act 1723 (9 Geo. 1 c. 22) was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain passed in 1723 in response to a series of raids by two groups of poachers
French Revolutionary Wars (7,801 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from 1793 to 1799 (1964) ch. 1. Lecky, William Edward Hartpole, A History of England in the Eighteenth Century Volume V (1890) p. 601 Charles Esdaile (2002)
King James Version (14,294 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"Rhemish Testament" for the Douay-Rheims Bible version. Similarly, a "History of England", whose fifth edition was published in 1775, writes merely that "[a]
An Agreement of the People (626 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
settlement of the Nation upon a new plan...". Cobbett's parliamentary history of England, from the Norman Conquest, in 1066 to the year, 1803 : from which
Clerk of the Pipe (705 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Clerk of the Pipe was a post in the Pipe Office of the English Exchequer and its successors. The incumbent was responsible for the pipe rolls on which
Robert the Bruce (11,840 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
pp. 233, 238 Arnold-Foster, Hugh Oakley (1907). "Bannockburn". A History of England from the Landing of Julius Caesar to the Present Day. London, Paris
County Asylums Act 1808 (150 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The County Asylums Act 1808 formed mental health law in England and Wales from 1808 to 1845. Notably, the Asylums Act established public mental asylums
Whelk (588 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and Calories in Whelk". recipeofhealth.com. Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England by Saint the Venerable Bede (Book 1, Chapter 1). "Snails and Slugs
Jacobitism (9,105 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Joan Aiken's Wolves Chronicles have as background an alternative history of England, in which King James III, a Stuart, is on the throne, and the Hanoverians
History of the Metropolitan Police (9,228 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of the Metropolitan Police is long and complex, with many different events taking place between its inception in 1829 to the present day. Before
Reginald Lane Poole (273 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
William Lane. He edited, among other works, with W. Hunt, Political History of England (twelve volumes, 1905–10). His works include: History of the Huguenots
Jacobitism (9,105 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Joan Aiken's Wolves Chronicles have as background an alternative history of England, in which King James III, a Stuart, is on the throne, and the Hanoverians
Banqueting House, Whitehall (2,502 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
I. The accession of Charles I heralded a new era in the cultural history of England. The new King was a great patron of the arts—he added to the Royal
County Asylums Act 1808 (150 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The County Asylums Act 1808 formed mental health law in England and Wales from 1808 to 1845. Notably, the Asylums Act established public mental asylums
Anglo-Japanese style (1,151 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Anglo-Japanese style developed in the period from approximately 1851 to 1900, when a new appreciation for Japanese design and culture affected British
American Revolution (21,101 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Hartpole, A History of England in the Eighteenth Century (1882) pp. 297–98 Lecky, William Edward Hartpole, A History of England in the Eighteenth
Battle of the Boyne (4,676 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
BBC. Retrieved 6 July 2019. Macaulay, T.B. (1849). "Chapter XVI". History of England from the accession of James II (1685) until the death of William III
Beerhouse (264 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A beerhouse was a type of public house created in the United Kingdom by the 1830 Beerhouse Act, legally defined as a place "where beer is sold to be consumed
List of English monarchs (6,956 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
representation. University of Chicago Press. Pollard, A. F. (2007). The History of England – From the Accession of Edward VI to the Death of Elizabeth (1547–1603)
Lord High Admiral of the United Kingdom (1,031 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Houbraken, Jacobus; Thoyras, Paul de Rapin; Vertue, George (1747). The History of England, A List of Admirals of England, 1228-1745. J. and P. Knapton. p. 271
Six Clerks (376 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Six Clerks' Office was a public legal office that served the equitable jurisdiction of the English Court of Chancery in London, England, until the
Tenant farmer (4,006 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Christopher (1985). "Types of Tenancy". In Thirsk, Joan (ed.). The Agrarian History of England and Wales, Volume 5, 1640–1750, Part 1, Regional farming systems.
Edward I of England (12,891 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
maint: ref=harv (link) Stubbs, William (1880). The Constitutional History of England. 2. Oxford, UK: Clarendon.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Sutherland, Donald
Ælfsige (264 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pauline (1989). Unification and Conquest: A Political and Social History of England in the Tenth and Eleventh Centuries. London: Edward Arnold. ISBN 0-7131-6532-4
Scire facias (627 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In English law, a writ of scire facias (Latin, meaning literally "make known") was a writ founded upon some judicial record directing the sheriff to make
Battle of Inverkeithing (5,385 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
In John Kenyon & Jane Ohlmeyer (eds.). The Civil Wars: A Military History of England, Scotland and Ireland 1638–1660. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Year Books (485 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Year Books are the modern English name that is now typically given to the earliest law reports of England. Substantial numbers of manuscripts circulated
Wiltshire Victoria County History (2,367 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Wiltshire in England. It forms part of the overall Victoria County History of England founded in 1899 in honour of Queen Victoria. With eighteen volumes
Hugh V, Count of Maine (258 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Germany, 1989), Tafel 692 Ordericus Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy,Trans. Thomas Forester, Volume II (Henry G. Bohn, London
Gesta Pontificum Anglorum (1,400 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
History or The Chronicle of the English Bishops, is an ecclesiastical history of England written by William of Malmesbury in the early 12th century. It covers
Ancient borough (6,724 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The ancient boroughs were a historic unit of lower-tier local government in England and Wales. The ancient boroughs covered only important towns and were
John Julius Norwich (2,076 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 0-385-41028-X Shakespeare's Kings: the Great Plays and the History of England in the Middle Ages: 1337–1485, New York : Scribner, 2000, ISBN 0-684-81434-X
Ferme ornée (576 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The term ferme ornée as used in English garden history derives from Stephen Switzer's term for 'ornamental farm'. It describes a country estate laid out
Siege of Namur (1695) (2,411 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Perspective). Longman. p. 247. ISBN 978-0582056299. Hume, David (1848). The History of England 1609-1714. p. 609. de la Colonie, Martin, Horsley, Walter (1904).
Assumpsit (1,671 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Assumpsit ("he has undertaken", from Latin, assumere), or more fully, action in assumpsit, was a form of action at common law used to enforce what are
Henry VI of England (6,096 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Merton Priory. London: Henry Frowde. p. 299. Lingard, J. (1854). A History of England. 5 (new ed.). Boston: Phillips, Sampson and Company. p. 107. hdl:2027/miun
Lady Jane Grey (3,505 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 0904387828. Ives 2009, p. 38 Pollard, Albert J. (1911). The History of England. London: Longmans, Green. p. 111. Reynolds, Nigel (3 June 2007). "The
Charles Macfarlane (970 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
substantial work was the Civil and Military History of England, part of Knight's Pictorial History of England, edited by George Lillie Craik, 8 vols. 1838-44
James V of Scotland (5,266 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Epitaphs and Monumental Inscriptions: Chiefly in Scotland Tudors (The History of England Volume 2) by Peter Ackroyd. Pan Books ISBN 9781447236818 Harrison
Anne of Cleves (3,417 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 9781842126332. Hall, Edward (1809). Hall's chronicle; containing the history of England, during the reign of Henry the Fourth, and the succeeding monarchs
Thomas Cromwell (10,202 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
queenanneboleyn.com. Retrieved 6 March 2020. Froude, James Anthony (1856). History of England from the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth. I (2011 ed.). Cambridge
History of English contract law (373 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of English contract law traces back to its roots in civil law, the lex mercatoria and the industrial revolution. Modern English contract law
Criminal Lunatics Act 1800 (1,180 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Criminal Lunatics Act 1800 (39 & 40 Geo 3 c 94) was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain that required and established a set procedure for the
Demagogue (7,309 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
human nature are to be found among demagogues. — Thomas Macaulay, The History of England from the Accession of James II (1849) Demagogues have arisen in democracies
Maritime history of Worthing (2,967 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Worthing, a seaside resort on the English Channel coast of West Sussex, southeast England, has a long maritime history predating its late 18th-century
Foreign exchange market (8,351 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 14 July 2012 ISBN 0471732834 T Southcliffe Ashton – An Economic History of England: The 18th Century, Volume 3 Taylor & Francis, 1955 Retrieved 13 July
Charles Townshend (1,094 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 21 March 2019. earl.), Philip Henry Stanhope (5th (1853). History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Aix-la-Chaoelle (to the
Irish Rebellion of 1641 (7,192 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
208–209 John Kenyon, Jane Ohlmeyer, eds. The Civil Wars, A Military History of England, Scotland and Ireland, 1638–1660, pp. 29–30. One of his [Phelim O'Neill's]
England, England (1,365 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
England, England is a satirical postmodern novel by Julian Barnes, published and shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 1998. While researchers have also
Denization (715 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Denization is an obsolete or defunct process in England and Ireland and the later Kingdom of Great Britain, the United Kingdom, and the British Empire
Murder of Lesley Molseed (5,771 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The murder of Lesley Molseed, an 11-year-old British girl, occurred on 5 October 1975 in West Yorkshire, England. Stefan Kiszko (/ˈkiːʃkoʊ/ KEESH-koh)
Eadred (1,073 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pauline (1989). Unification and Conquest. A Political and Social History of England in the Tenth and Eleventh Centuries. London. Stenton, Frank Merry
Appropriation Act (566 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
An Appropriation Act is an Act of Parliament passed by the United Kingdom Parliament which, like a Consolidated Fund Act, allows the Treasury to issue
Isle of Ely (1,211 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
area's natural defences led to it playing a role in the military history of England. Following the Norman Conquest, the Isle became a refuge for Anglo-Saxon
Harrying of the North (3,944 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Yorkshire, 1066–1154. pg. 298 Orderic Vitalis. The Ecclesiastical history of England and Normandy (p. 28); retrieved 24 February 2014. Dalton, pg. 11.
History of Rochester, Kent (5,721 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(privately published) Mackie, J.D. (1988), The Earlier Tudors, The Oxford History of England, VII, OUP, ISBN 0-19-821706-4 Marsh, Ronald (1974), Rochester, The
Elias I, Count of Maine (377 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
History of England and Normandy,Trans. Thomas Forester, Volume II (Henry G. Bohn, London, 1854), p. 223 Ordericus Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History
University of Oxford (16,582 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Oxford. McKisack, May (1963). The Fourteenth Century 1307–1399. Oxford History of England. p. 501. Daniel J. Boorstin. (1958.) The Americans; the Colonial Experience
Rousham House (1,141 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rousham House (also known as Rousham Park) is a country house at Rousham in Oxfordshire, England. The house, which has been continuously in the ownership
Ulster loyalism (1,634 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University Press, 2001. p.39. Arthur Lyon Cross (1920). A shorter history of England and greater Britain. The Macmillan company. pp. 593–595, 597. Retrieved
1911 Liverpool general transport strike (370 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1911 Liverpool general transport strike, also known as the great transport workers' strike, involved dockers, railway workers and sailors, as well
History of the horse in Britain (8,004 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-0-434-98083-3 Hallam, H.E. (2011) [1988], The Agrarian History of England and Wales Volume II 1042–1350, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-20011-3
Rudyard Kipling bibliography (2,901 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
with W. Heath Robinson (illustrator) Rewards and Fairies (1910) A History of England (1911), non-fiction, with Charles Robert Leslie Fletcher Songs from
Statute of Uses (2,139 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Statute of Uses (27 Hen 8 c 10) was an Act of the Parliament of England that restricted the application of uses in English property law. The Statute
Letters of Junius (399 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Letters of Junius (or Junius: Stat nominis umbra) is a collection of private and open letters critical of the government of King George III from an anonymous
Alan III, Duke of Brittany (752 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
New York, UK, 1995), pp. 78-9 Ordericus Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, Trans. Thomas Forester, Volume II (Henry G. Bohn, London
Dinosaur (21,152 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Natural History of Oxford-shire: Being an Essay toward the Natural History of England. Printed at the Theater in OXFORD, and are to be had there: And in
John Maddicott (299 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
English historian who has published works on the political and social history of England in the 13th and 14th centuries, and has also written a number of leading
Hundred Years' War (11,146 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
England under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075–1225. New Oxford History of England. London: OUP. ISBN 978-0-19-822741-0.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) Bean
Decapitation (6,884 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Press. p. 172. ISBN 9781420065930. Smollett, T. (1758). A Complete History of England, from the Descent of Julius Caesar. 4. London. p. 488. Cheetham, J
Bernicia (1,350 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-0-7083-1374-9. Retrieved 18 October 2011. John Morris The History of England – From the Earliest Times to the Norman Conquest By Thomas Hodgkin
Boudica (4,609 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
English History, Book 2. pp. 69–72. Raphael Holinshed, Chronicles: History of England 4.9-13 Lawson, Stephanie (19 January 2013). "Nationalism and biographical
Sword and sorcery (2,974 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
An island story; a child's history of England (1906).
Thor (7,264 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
series, XXIII, 1–24, pp. 17– ; (1971). Anglo-Saxon England, Oxford History of England 2, 1943, 3rd ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1971, ISBN 9780198217169
Battle of Stamford Bridge (1,938 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Forester (ed.). The Chronicle of Henry of Huntington, The History of England, From the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Accession of Henry II.
Greyhound (3,295 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Shields. Chicago: Rand Mcnally 1891 Greyhound Nation: A Coevolutionary History of England, 1200-1900 Edmund Russell, Cambridge University Press 2018. ISBN 978-0521762090
Benjamin Thorpe (1,052 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in 1845 as A History of England under the Anglo-Saxon Kings. It was followed eventually by a version of Lappenberg's History of England under the Norman
Prosecutor (4,790 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of a crime, should the prosecutor refuse to indict. In the early history of England, victims of a crime and their family had the right to hire a private
Quakers (14,334 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Anthony; Schofield, Roger; Schofield, R. S. (1989). The population history of England, 1541–1871: a reconstruction. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University
Witenagemot (2,847 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Leyser, The Anglo-Saxons, p. 117 Liebermann 1961, p. 13. Hodgkin, History of England, p. 232. Chadwick, Anglo-Saxon Institutions, p. 308. Liebermann 1961
Battle of Ponza (1552) (459 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Braudel p.924 [1] European warfare, 1494-1660 by Jeremy Black p.177 The History of England Sharon Turner, p.311 Whitehouse, Rosie (2013). Bradt Liguria: The
Boston Tea Party (5,624 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander, Revolutionary Politician, 129. Cobbett, Parliamentary History of England, XVII, pg. 1280-1281 Richardson, Bruce. "Benjamin Franklin's Views
Convention Parliament (1660) (1,136 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
1660 Pepys' Diary Entry for 16 March 1660 Entry for 26 April 1660 History of England, Thomas Babington Macaulay pp 109-110 "An Act for removing and preventing
Riding (country subdivision) (1,799 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
administrative history. Relay. ISBN 9780946327133. Stubbs, William. Constitutional History of England. Etymology on line Information about Canadian ridings
English Rebel Songs 1381–1984 (513 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Songs Of Toil by Karl Dallas, A Touch On The Times, and A Ballad History of England by Roy Palmer. Many of the songs are still performed by modern English
People's history (1,316 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was also used in the title of A. L. Morton's 1938 book, A People's History of England. Yet it was E. P. Thompson's essay History from Below in The Times
Scoti (931 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
MacCoinnich, Eachdraidh na h-Alba, Glasgow, 1867, p. 18-19. C. Oman, A History of England before the Norman Conquest, London, 1910, p. 157. P. Freeman, Ireland
Archaeology (11,043 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
May 2009, retrieved 5 May 2009 English Heritage – Stonehenge & the History of England: English Heritage, English Heritage, archived from the original on
English Rebel Songs 1381–1984 (513 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Songs Of Toil by Karl Dallas, A Touch On The Times, and A Ballad History of England by Roy Palmer. Many of the songs are still performed by modern English
Kent (7,520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
June 2007. Stenton, Frank M (1971), Anglo-Saxon England, The Oxford History of England, II, OUP, ISBN 978-0-19-821716-9 David Bates (1975). The Character
Ambergris (2,201 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Businessweek. Retrieved 31 January 2013. Lord Macaulay (1848). "IV". The History of England from the Accession of James II. 1. Harper. p. 222. Abbott, Edward
Archaeology (11,043 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
May 2009, retrieved 5 May 2009 English Heritage – Stonehenge & the History of England: English Heritage, English Heritage, archived from the original on
Battle of Dun Nechtain (2,530 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2009. Bede. "Ecclesiastical History of England III". Retrieved 6 September 2009. Bede. "Ecclesiastical History of England IV". Retrieved 6 September 2009
Charter of Liberties (2,204 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
England. Pollock & Maitland (1968), pp. 95 et seq. J. M. Lappenberg, History of England Under the Angevin Kings, Vol. 1 (1887) Eadmer, Historia novella, pp
1823 in the United Kingdom (740 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Macbeth (in The London Magazine, October). Mrs Markham's children's A History of England from the First Invasion by the Romans to the End of the Reign of George
Humber the Hun (1,090 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
conclusion of the year M.DCC.LVI. (1756); and A new and complete history of England, from the first settlement of Brutus, upwards of one thousand years
Paul de Rapin (1,147 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rapin), was a French historian writing under English patronage. His History of England, written and first published in French in 1724–27, was an influential
Industrial Revolution (26,866 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(help) Usher, Abbott Payson (1920). "An Introduction to the Industrial History of England". University of Michigan Press. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
Apothecaries Act 1815 (292 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Apothecaries Act 1815 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (citation 55 Geo.lll, c.194) with the long title "An Act for better regulating
Hereward the Wake (4,794 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
appears to have taken over his lands. Joseph Harrop in his 1764 A New History of England, suggests that after his escape from Ely, Hereward went to Scotland
Normans (6,770 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Maitland, FW (1988), Domesday Book and Beyond: Three Essays in the Early History of England (2d ed.), Cambridge University Press (feudal Saxons) Mortimer, R (1994)
Lords of Appeal in Ordinary (1,078 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
– via Wikisource. May, Sir Thomas Erskine (1896). Constitutional History of England since the Accession of George the Third (11th ed.). London: Longmans
Thorough (496 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In 17th century England, Thorough was a name given by Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford to a scheme of his to establish absolute monarchy in England
Avalon (4,140 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Malmesbury, a 12th-century historian interested in Arthur, wrote in his history of England: "But Arthur's grave is nowhere seen, whence antiquity of fables still
Ecclesiastical history of the Catholic Church (11,422 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum, which describes in five books the history of England from the Roman conquest to 731, though treating principally of events
Fundamental Laws of England (1,858 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In the 1760s William Blackstone described the Fundamental Laws of England in Commentaries on the Laws of England, Book the First – Chapter the First :
Cornish Stannary Parliament (198 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Cornish Stannary Parliament was chartered in 1201, by King John. In spite of the name the Parliament was not a national assembly. The charter granted
Surcoat (611 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tabard Nunn, pp. 14, 23, 24, 28 Farr, E.; et al. (1873). The National History of England. 1. London & Glasgow: William Collins, Sons & Company. Retrieved 2011-04-06
Eagle Ironworks, Oxford (838 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Eagle Ironworks was an ironworks owned by W. Lucy & Co. on the Oxford Canal in Jericho, Oxford, England. William Carter founded the works in 1812 with
Restrictive Trade Practices Act 1956 (200 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Restrictive Trade Practices Act 1956 was an act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom intended to enforce competition. It required that any agreement
Allen Ginsberg (12,243 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
could well turn out to have been a very significant moment in the history of England—or at least in the history of English Poetry". Soon after the bookshop
Roger Bacon (9,036 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(2005). Bill Nye's Comic History of England, Chicago, Thompson and Thomas, 1896, p. 136 Bill Nye's Comic History of England, Chicago, Thompson and Thomas
Phoenicia (9,380 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Malcolm; Andrew Fleming (1987). The South West to AD 1,000 (Regional history of England series No.:8). Harlow, Essex: Longman. ISBN 978-0-582-49274-5., for
Scotia (952 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dead link] C. Oman, A History of England before the Norman Conquest, London, 1910, p. 157. Sir Charles Oman: A History of England before the Norman Conquest
The Wodehouse (3,704 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Wodehouse (formerly also Woodhouse) is a grade II* listed English country house near Wombourne, Staffordshire, notable as the family seat of the Georgian
Hanged, drawn and quartered (7,356 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Colburn Feilden, Henry St. Clair (2009) [1910], A Short Constitutional History of England, Read Books, ISBN 978-1-4446-9107-8 Fraser, Antonia (2005) [1996]
Battle of Hastings (7,897 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pauline (1989). Unification and Conquest: A Political and Social History of England in the Tenth and Eleventh Centuries. London: Edward Arnold. ISBN 0-7131-6532-4
State room (612 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
University Press. ISBN 0-300-02273-5. Halliday, F. E. (1967). Cultural History of England. London: Thames and Hudson. The Country House in Perspective. Pavilion
1870 in the United Kingdom (800 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 0-304-35730-8. Ensor, R.C.K. (1936). 14, "England 1870–1914". The Oxford History of England. Oxford University Press. p. 16. Palmer, Alan; Palmer, Veronica (1992)
Scots' Dike (3,098 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Border Line, p.89. Oliver & Boyd Ridpath, George (1776). The Border History of England and Scotland Deduced from the Earliest Times to the Union of the Two
November 11 (4,594 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Netherlands) Women's Day (Belgium) George Lillie Craik (1850). Pictorical History of England. W.S. Orr & Company. p. 195. "Huge Explosion Reportedly Kills Scores
Worcester College, Oxford (2,418 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
his father William Clarke (which are of crucial importance for the history of England during the period of the Commonwealth and Protectorate) and a large
Sidney Godolphin, 1st Earl of Godolphin (1,875 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sundstrom has asserted that Godolphin is an important figure in the history of England because: […] first he raised the money required to blunt French hegemony
Gathering Day (400 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-1-84694-232-7. Retrieved 9 September 2012. James Hamilton Wylie (1884). History of England Under Henry the Fourth: 1399-1404. Longmans, Green and Co. p. 285
Comptroller of the Household (1,289 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Haven, Connecticut: Shoe String Press. J. Palmer, A Biographical History of England (1824), 86–87 "Gavin Barwell given ancient Government role after holding
Mark Noble (biographer) (1,153 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
"Continuation" (3 vols. London, 1806) of James Granger's "Biographical History of England". His other works are: "Two Dissertations on the Mint and Coins of
Guy Fawkes Night (5,850 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Publications, ISBN 978-1-85770-050-3 Gardiner, Samuel Rawson (2009), History of England from the Accession of James I. to the Outbreak of the Civil War 1603–1642
Bill of Middlesex (1,909 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bill of Middlesex was a legal fiction used by the Court of King's Bench to gain jurisdiction over cases traditionally in the remit of the Court of
Henry Knighton (559 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
England, and an ecclesiastical historian (chronicler). who wrote a history of England from the Norman conquest until 1396, thought to be the year he died
Edmund Calamy (historian) (987 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
of his History of England... (1718) An Answer to Dr. Edmund Calamy's Letter to Mr. Archdeacon Echard Upon Occasion of his History of England... (1718)
George Wither (3,177 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Wither's long life spanned one of the most tumultuous periods in the history of England, during the reigns of Elizabeth I, James I, and Charles I, the Civil
Indian Rebellion of 1857 (21,620 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Google Books Smith, John Frederick (1864), John Cassell's Illustrated history of England – William Howitt, John Cassell, retrieved 17 September 2012 – via
HM Treasury (1,609 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Secondary - [1] from Cambridge Dictionaries (Baron) T B Macaulay - History of England, Volume 1 CUP Archive, 18 Jan 2012 Retrieved 2012-06-25 "Resignation
Oath of Allegiance of James I of England (2,802 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Oath of Allegiance of 1606 was an oath requiring English Catholics to swear allegiance to James I over the Pope. It was adopted by Parliament the year