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searching for Gratian (consul) 49 found (601 total)

alternate case: gratian (consul)

Gratian (1,286 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

figures with this name, including his paternal grandfather, see Gratian (disambiguation). Gratian (/ˈɡreɪʃən/; Latin: Flavius Gratianus Augustus; 18 April/23
Grațian Sepi (107 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Grațian Sepi (born 30 December 1910 in Vălcani, Austria-Hungary (now in Romania) – deceased 6 March 1977) was a Romanian footballer who played as a striker
Decretum Gratiani (2,108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
written in the 12th century as a legal textbook by the jurist known as Gratian. It forms the first part of the collection of six legal texts, which together
Gratian (usurper) (297 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gratian or Gratianus (died 407) was a Roman usurper (407) in Roman Britain. Following the death of the usurper Marcus, Gratian was acclaimed as emperor
Felinus and Gratian (707 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saints Felinus and Gratian(us) (sometimes Gratinian(us)) (d. 250 AD) are venerated as martyrs by the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. They are
Gratian (disambiguation) (77 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gratian can refer to: Felinus and Gratian (d. 250 AD), martyrs and saints Gratian the Elder, a 4th-century Roman soldier. Father of the emperors Valens
Gracianus Municeps (271 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
had died at the hands of either a supporter of the late Roman Emperor Gratian or by one of Gracianus Municeps' own followers. Despite mention previously
Valentinian dynasty (174 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Empire from 364 to 378. Western emperors: Valentinian I (364–375) his sons Gratian (375–383) and Valentinian II (375–392) Eastern emperor(s): Valentinian
Decretist (107 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a decretist was student and interpreter of the Decretum Gratiani. Like Gratian, the decretists sought to provide "a harmony of discordant canons" (concordia
Gratian the Elder (399 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gratian the Elder (/ˈɡreɪʃən/; Latin: Gratianus Funarius; Gratianus Major, "Gratian the Elder") was an Illyrian soldier of the Roman Empire who flourished
Jerome Gratian (86 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jerónimo Gracián or Jerome Gratian (6 June 1545 – 21 September 1614) was a Spanish Carmelite and writer. He was the spiritual director of St Teresa of
Pope Gregory VI (817 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Gratian in Rome (Latin: Johannes Gratianus), was Pope from 1 May 1045 until his abdication at the Council of Sutri on 20 December 1046. Gratian, the
Gatianus of Tours (961 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gatianus (Catianus, Gatianus, Gratianus; French: Cassien, Gatien, Gratien) (3rd century CE) was the founding bishop of the see of Tours. According to
Valentinian II (1,307 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
second wife, Justina. He was the half-brother of Valentinian’s other son, Gratian, who had shared the imperial title with his father since 367. He had three
Valens (3,179 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
321 respectively. They had grown up on estates purchased by their father Gratian the Elder in Africa and Britain. While Valentinian had enjoyed a successful
Valentinian I (4,195 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
great western emperor". He founded the Valentinian Dynasty, with his sons Gratian and Valentinian II succeeding him in the western half of the empire.
Extravagantes (607 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
special authority. More precisely, they are not found in the Decree of Gratian or the three official collections of the Corpus Juris (the Decretals of
Valentinian (86 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
emperors: Valentinian I (321–375), Roman emperor from 364 to 375, son of Gratian the Elder, commonly known as Valentinian the Great Valentinian II (371–392)
Persecution of pagans in the late Roman Empire (3,687 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
361 till 375, Paganism was relatively tolerated, until three Emperors, Gratian, Valentinian II and Theodosius I, under Bishop of Milan Saint Ambrose's
Theodosius I (3,525 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and Gratian, succeeded him as rulers of the Western Roman Empire. In 378, after the disastrous Battle of Adrianople where Valens was killed, Gratian invited
Arundel Priory (512 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sussex, England by Roger de Montgomery, earl of Shrewsbury, in 1102, when Gratian, a monk of Sées in Normandy, became first prior. In 1269, the priory granted
370s (2,726 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Merobaudes (Magister militum), gives them land to settle on the Danube. Gratian, age 16, takes over the government at Augusta Treverorum (modern Trier)
Syro-Malabar Catholic Eparchy of Bijnor (518 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
March 1972 by the Papal Bull Beatorum Apostolorum of Pope Paul VI. Rev. Fr Gratian Mundadan CMI was appointed the Apostolic Exarch. The Apostolic exarchate
Laeta (246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Empress consort of Gratian of the Western Roman Empire. The only relation of Laeta mentioned by Zosimus was her mother Pissamena. Gratian was first married
378 (630 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Argentovaria: Emperor Gratian is forced to recall his army he has sent East. The Lentienses are defeated by Mallobaudes near Colmar (France). Gratian gains the title
San Vittore al Corpo, Milan (313 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
4th-century basilica and mausoleum that once held the burials of the emperors Gratian and Valentinian III. The basilica was enlarged in the 8th century to house
Magnus Maximus (2,800 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
emperor Gratian; and through negotiation with emperor Theodosius I the following year he was made emperor in Britannia and Gaul – while Gratian's brother
Battle of Thessalonica (380) (80 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thessalonica and surrendered control of operations to the Western Emperor, Gratian. Peter Heather, 1996. The Goths, Blackwell Publishers. ISBN 0-631-16536-3
Paucapalea (50 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the twelfth century. He produced the first commentary on the Decretum of Gratian, his teacher. J. F. v. Schulte (1890), Die Summa des Paucapalea über das
Ausonius (1,819 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
modern Bordeaux, France. For a time he was tutor to the future emperor Gratian, who afterwards bestowed the consulship on him. His best-known poems are
Flavia Maxima Constantia (766 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Flavia Maxima Constantia (361/362 – 383) was the first Empress consort of Gratian of the Western Roman Empire. According to Ammianus Marcellinus, Constantia
Corpus Juris Canonici (2,196 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of a later date than the "Decree" of Gratian have been called "Extravagantes", i. e. laws not contained in Gratian's Decretum (Vagantes extra Decretum)
Pope Damasus I (2,135 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and Via Ardeatina", the exact location of which is lost. The reign of Gratian, during Damasus' papacy, forms an important epoch in ecclesiastical history
Andragathius (226 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
equitum of Magnus Maximus. He captured and murdered the Roman Emperor Gratian in 383, between Lyons and Grenoble. Andragathius threw himself into the
Decretal (2,289 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
These are the canonical collections of a later date than the "Decretum" of Gratian (about 1150). The commentators on these collections are named decretalists
Decline of Greco-Roman polytheism (7,020 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(Valentinian I) in the year 375, Gratian began his actual reign at the age of sixteen. Six days after the death of Valentinian I, Gratian’s half brother, Valentinian
Marcus (usurper) (336 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was soon killed by them and replaced with another short-lived usurper, Gratian. In his pseudohistorical Historia Regum Britanniae, Geoffrey of Monmouth
Mallobaudes (209 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
intervene on his behalf.[clarification needed] Appointed comes domesticorum by Gratian, he was second-in-command of the army in Gaul in 378 when he defeated the
Antipope Gregory VI (226 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
about the Antipope Gregory VI. For the article on Pope Gregory VI or John Gratian, also sometimes reckoned an antipope, see Pope Gregory VI. On the death
Canon law (Catholic Church) (2,962 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was assembled by the Camaldolese monk Gratian in the 11th century, commonly known as the Decretum Gratiani ("Gratian's Decree"). Canon law greatly increased
Pontifex Maximus (4,667 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
office. Its last use with reference to the emperors is in inscriptions of Gratian (reigned 375–383) who, however, then decided to omit the words "pontifex
Cularo (227 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
until 381, when it was renamed Gratianopolis in honor of Roman emperor Gratian. The first reference to Grenoble dates back to July 43 BC. At that time
Constantinian dynasty (372 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Constantius II and Faustina Flavia Maxima Faustina Constantia, wife of Gratian Constans I Helena, wife of Julian From marriage between Constantius
Quintus Clodius Hermogenianus Olybrius (521 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
flexible politicians who did well both under Valentinian I [...] and under Gratian." Olybrius was a member of the senatorial aristocracy of Rome. He was
Merobaudes (general) (288 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
together with his brother Gratian, and Merobaudes influenced both of them. Merobaudes was twice consul, in 377 with Gratian and in 383 with Saturninus
Măeriște (533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Măerişte (Hungarian: Krasznahidvég; German: Bruckend) is a commune located in Sălaj County, Romania. The commune, with an area of 74.97 km2 (7,500 ha)
Sremska Mitrovica (2,745 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(276-282), Maximianus Herculius (285-310), Constantius II (337-361) and Gratian (367-383). In Serbian, the town is known as Сремска Митровица or Sremska
Edict of Thessalonica (1,027 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
in the west, Gratian, promoted persecution of heretics in the west. The Edict of Thessalonica was jointly issued by Theodosius I, Gratian, and Valentinian
Ambrose (6,001 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
colleague's home seeking to hide. Upon receiving a letter from the Emperor Gratian praising the appropriateness of Rome appointing individuals evidently worthy