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searching for Gratian (consul) 191 found (592 total)

alternate case: gratian (consul)

Gratian (1,347 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For other figures with this name, see Gratian (disambiguation). Gratian (/ˈɡreɪʃən/; Latin: Flavius Gratianus Augustus; 18 April/23 May 359 – 25 August
Decretum Gratiani (2,108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
written in the 12th century as a legal textbook by the jurist known as Gratian. It forms the first part of the collection of six legal texts, which together
Grațian Sepi (107 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Grațian Sepi (born 30 December 1910 in Vălcani, Austria-Hungary (now in Romania) – deceased 6 March 1977) was a Romanian footballer who played as a striker
Gratian (usurper) (297 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gratian or Gratianus (died 407) was a Roman usurper (407) in Roman Britain. Following the death of the usurper Marcus, Gratian was acclaimed as emperor
Felinus and Gratian (707 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saints Felinus and Gratian(us) (sometimes Gratinian(us)) (d. 250 AD) are venerated as martyrs by the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. They are
Valentinian dynasty (174 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Empire from 364 to 378. Western emperors: Valentinian I (364–375) his sons Gratian (375–383) and Valentinian II (375–392) Eastern emperor(s): Valentinian
Gratian the Elder (399 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gratian the Elder (/ˈɡreɪʃən/; Latin: Gratianus Funarius; Gratianus Major, "Gratian the Elder") was an Illyrian soldier of the Roman Empire who flourished
Gracianus Municeps (271 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
had died at the hands of either a supporter of the late Roman Emperor Gratian or by one of Gracianus Municeps' own followers. Despite mention previously
Decretist (107 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a decretist was student and interpreter of the Decretum Gratiani. Like Gratian, the decretists sought to provide "a harmony of discordant canons" (concordia
Jerome Gratian (85 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jerónimo Gracián or Jerome Gratian (6 June 1545 – 21 September 1614) was a Spanish Carmelite and writer. He was the spiritual director of St Teresa of
Valentinian II (1,307 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
second wife, Justina. He was the half-brother of Valentinian’s other son, Gratian, who had shared the imperial title with his father since 367. He had three
Pope Gregory VI (817 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Gratian in Rome (Latin: Johannes Gratianus), was Pope from 1 May 1045 until his abdication at the Council of Sutri on 20 December 1046. Gratian, the
Gatianus of Tours (961 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gatianus (Catianus, Gatianus, Gratianus; French: Cassien, Gatien, Gratien) (3rd century CE) was the founding bishop of the see of Tours. According to
Valens (3,134 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
321 respectively. They had grown up on estates purchased by their father Gratian the Elder in Africa and Britain. While Valentinian had enjoyed a successful
Extravagantes (607 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
special authority. More precisely, they are not found in the Decree of Gratian or the three official collections of the Corpus Juris (the Decretals of
Anti-paganism policy of late Roman Emperors (3,128 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gratian. Ambrose, Gratian, Valentinian and Theodosius rejected requests to restore the Altar. Main article: Gratian § Repression of Paganism Gratian
Valentinian I (4,191 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
great western emperor". He founded the Valentinian Dynasty, with his sons Gratian and Valentinian II succeeding him in the western half of the empire.
Theodosius I (3,505 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and Gratian, succeeded him as rulers of the Western Roman Empire. In 378, after the disastrous Battle of Adrianople where Valens was killed, Gratian invited
370s (2,726 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Merobaudes (Magister militum), gives them land to settle on the Danube. Gratian, age 16, takes over the government at Augusta Treverorum (modern Trier)
Arundel Priory (512 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sussex, England by Roger de Montgomery, earl of Shrewsbury, in 1102, when Gratian, a monk of Sées in Normandy, became first prior. In 1269, the priory granted
Laeta (246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Empress consort of Gratian of the Western Roman Empire. The only relation of Laeta mentioned by Zosimus was her mother Pissamena. Gratian was first married
Syro-Malabar Catholic Eparchy of Bijnor (518 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
March 1972 by the Papal Bull Beatorum Apostolorum of Pope Paul VI. Rev. Fr Gratian Mundadan CMI was appointed the Apostolic Exarch. The Apostolic exarchate
San Vittore al Corpo, Milan (313 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
4th-century basilica and mausoleum that once held the burials of the emperors Gratian and Valentinian III. The basilica was enlarged in the 8th century to house
Mallobaudes (209 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
intervene on his behalf.[clarification needed] Appointed comes domesticorum by Gratian, he was second-in-command of the army in Gaul in 378 when he defeated the
Antipope Gregory VI (226 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
about the Antipope Gregory VI. For the article on Pope Gregory VI or John Gratian, also sometimes reckoned an antipope, see Pope Gregory VI. On the death
Magnus Maximus (2,727 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
emperor Gratian; and through negotiation with emperor Theodosius I the following year he was made emperor in Britannia and Gaul – while Gratian's brother
Paucapalea (50 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the twelfth century. He produced the first commentary on the Decretum of Gratian, his teacher. J. F. v. Schulte (1890), Die Summa des Paucapalea über das
Ausonius (1,710 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
modern Bordeaux, France. For a time he was tutor to the future emperor Gratian, who afterwards bestowed the consulship on him. His best-known poems are
Battle of Thessalonica (380) (80 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thessalonica and surrendered control of operations to the Western Emperor, Gratian. Peter Heather, 1996. The Goths, Blackwell Publishers. ISBN 0-631-16536-3
Flavia Maxima Constantia (764 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Flavia Maxima Constantia (361/362 – 383) was the first Empress consort of Gratian of the Western Roman Empire. According to Ammianus Marcellinus, Constantia
Corpus Juris Canonici (2,196 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of a later date than the "Decree" of Gratian have been called "Extravagantes", i. e. laws not contained in Gratian's Decretum (Vagantes extra Decretum)
Decretal (2,218 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
These are the canonical collections of a later date than the "Decretum" of Gratian (about 1150). The commentators on these collections are named decretalists
Andragathius (226 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
equitum of Magnus Maximus. He captured and murdered the Roman Emperor Gratian in 383, between Lyons and Grenoble. Andragathius threw himself into the
Decline of Greco-Roman polytheism (7,031 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(Valentinian I) in the year 375, Gratian began his actual reign at the age of sixteen. Six days after the death of Valentinian I, Gratian’s half brother, Valentinian
Marcus (usurper) (336 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was soon killed by them and replaced with another short-lived usurper, Gratian. In his pseudohistorical Historia Regum Britanniae, Geoffrey of Monmouth
Pontifex Maximus (4,663 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
office. Its last use with reference to the emperors is in inscriptions of Gratian (reigned 375–383) who, however, then decided to omit the words "pontifex
378 (630 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Argentovaria: Emperor Gratian is forced to recall his army he has sent East. The Lentienses are defeated by Mallobaudes near Colmar (France). Gratian gains the title
Canon law (Catholic Church) (2,962 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was assembled by the Camaldolese monk Gratian in the 11th century, commonly known as the Decretum Gratiani ("Gratian's Decree"). Canon law greatly increased
Constantinian dynasty (372 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Constantius II and Faustina Flavia Maxima Faustina Constantia, wife of Gratian Constans I Helena, wife of Julian From marriage between Constantius
Quintus Clodius Hermogenianus Olybrius (521 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
flexible politicians who did well both under Valentinian I [...] and under Gratian." Olybrius was a member of the senatorial aristocracy of Rome. He was
Merobaudes (general) (288 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
together with his brother Gratian, and Merobaudes influenced both of them. Merobaudes was twice consul, in 377 with Gratian and in 383 with Saturninus
Măeriște (536 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Măerişte (Hungarian: Krasznahidvég; German: Bruckend) is a commune located in Sălaj County, Romania. The commune, with an area of 74.97 km2 (7,500 ha)
Sremska Mitrovica (2,785 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(276-282), Maximianus Herculius (285-310), Constantius II (337-361) and Gratian (367-383). In Serbian, the town is known as Сремска Митровица or Sremska
Pope Damasus I (2,424 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and Via Ardeatina", the exact location of which is lost. The reign of Gratian, during Damasus' papacy, forms an important epoch in ecclesiastical history
380s (1,994 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
baptized. February 27 – Edict of Thessalonica: Theodosius I, with co-emperors Gratian and Valentinian II, declare their wish that all Roman citizens convert
Ambrose (5,844 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
colleague's home seeking to hide. Upon receiving a letter from the Emperor Gratian praising the appropriateness of Rome appointing individuals evidently worthy
Fritigern (715 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(376-382) led to favourable terms for the Goths when peace was made with Gratian and Theodosius I in 382. Socrates Scholasticus, Sozomen, and Zosimus
Quintus Aurelius Symmachus (1,392 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
to Christianity, and led an unsuccessful delegation of protest against Gratian, when he ordered the Altar of Victory removed from the curia, the principal
379 (336 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
in the Balkans as military allies (foederati). Gratian refuses the title of Eastern Emperor. Gratian renounces the title Pontifex Maximus. Britain is
Aelia Flaccilla (770 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
existence of only three imperial children and other sources do not mention Gratian. Gratian was possibly a relation of some sort but not an actual member of the
Edict of Thessalonica (1,026 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
in the west, Gratian, promoted persecution of heretics in the west. The Edict of Thessalonica was jointly issued by Theodosius I, Gratian, and Valentinian
Marina Severa (739 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
first wife of Emperor Valentinian I. She was the mother of later Emperor Gratian. Her full name is not actually known. Marina Severa is a combination of
Publius Flavius Vegetius Renatus (1,153 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
event alluded to in his Epitoma rei militaris is the death of the Emperor Gratian (383); the earliest attestation of this work is a subscriptio by one Flavius
Battle of Adrianople (3,436 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Valens (of the Eastern Empire) then asked Gratian, the western emperor, for reinforcements to fight the Goths. Gratian sent the general Frigeridus with reinforcements
Flavius Victor (194 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
been used by former Emperor Valentinian I who declared his son and heir Gratian an Augustus in 367 and by Theodosius who had declared his own son and heir
Timothy Reuter (401 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
served as the basis for a concordance to the work of the medieval canonist Gratian. In 1994, Reuter was appointed to a professorship at the University of
381 (333 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gratian moves the capital to Mediolanum (modern Milan). Because of his Christian beliefs, he eliminates Pontifex Maximus as Imperial title. Gratian also
Huguccio (478 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
decretal Cum Marthae (X 3.41.16).[2] He wrote a "Summa" on the "Decretum" of Gratian, concluded according to some in 1187, according to others after 1190, the
Battle of Argentovaria (138 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The king of the Lentienses, Priarius, died during the battle. Emperor Gratian, who had given the command of the army for the battle to Naniemus and Mallobaudes
Secundian, Marcellian and Verian (356 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Felinus and Gratian were based on those of Secundian and his companions. Sabine Baring-Gould writes that “the so-called Acts of SS. Gratian and Felinus
377 (606 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alans have also moved up to the river. Emperor Valens requests his nephew Gratian to send Roman troops against the Goths. He responds by sending the ageing
Pons Cestius (396 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Pons Cestius was rebuilt by the Emperors Valentinian I, Valens and Gratian and re-dedicated in 370 as the Pons Gratiani. The bridge was rebuilt using
Themistius (1,965 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
He flourished in the reigns of Constantius II, Julian, Jovian, Valens, Gratian, and Theodosius I; and he enjoyed the favour of all those emperors, notwithstanding
375 (458 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Merobaudes (Magister militum), gives them land to settle on the Danube. Gratian, age 16, takes over the government at Augusta Treverorum (modern Trier)
380 (461 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
baptized. February 27 – Edict of Thessalonica: Theodosius I, with co-emperors Gratian and Valentinian II, declare their wish that all Roman citizens convert
Whitehead Women's Pairs (327 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anne Burnstein, Mrs. G. Rosenbaum 1947 Gratian Goldstein, Josephine Gutman Ruth Sherman, Helen Sobel 1948 Gratian Goldstein, Josephine Gutman Mildred Cunningham
407 (299 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gratian, Roman usurper, is installed as emperor after the death of Marcus. According to Orosius, he is a native Briton of urban aristocracy. Gratian is
Basiliscus (3,061 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Simon of Bisignano (83 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and March 1179. Like Paucapalea, he, too, might have been a student of Gratian himself. S. Kuttner, Repertorium der Kanonistik (1140-1234): Prodromus
Abundantius (consul) (134 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Roman Empire. Of Scythian origin, he entered the Roman army under emperor Gratian (367-375) and climbed up its ranks until, around 392 and under emperor
Constantius III (839 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
University Press, 2004, ISBN 0-8018-7978-7, pp. 157–160 C.E. Stevens, "Marcus, Gratian, Constantine", Athenaeum, 35 (1957), pp. 316–47 Media related to Constantius
Cularo (216 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a landmark of this era. In 381, wishing to thank and honor the emperor Gratian for having created there a bishopric, the inhabitants of Cularo renamed
Sternberg Women's Board-a-Match Teams (395 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emily Folline, Helen Sobel, Margaret Wagar, Sally Young Josephine Gutman, Gratian Goldstein, Marjorie Perlmutter, Gretchen Schildmiller 1946 Emily Folline
Hoxne Hoard (8,489 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
concentration of Trier coins is much greater after 367, perhaps associated with Gratian moving his court to Trier. Almost every silver siliqua in the hoard has
Decretals of Gregory IX (1,572 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
five of these collections of pontifical legislation from the Decretum of Gratian (c. 1150) to the pontificate of Gregory IX (1150-1227). Raymond executed
Honorius (emperor) (2,736 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Empire, and the soldiers supported the revolts of Marcus (406–407), Gratian (407), and Constantine III. Constantine invaded Gaul in 407, occupying
Chicago Mixed Board-a-Match (401 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wagar Marianne Boschan, Gertrude Eberson, David Murray, Lewis Tubbs 1955 Gratian Goldstein, Harold Harkavy, Terry Michaels, Alvin Roth Mary Bowden, Doug
Council of Aquileia, 381 (497 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Aquileia. The council was held in September 381 AD and summoned by Gratian, the Western Roman Emperor, explicitly to "solve the contradictions of
Anti-paganism influenced by Saint Ambrose (791 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
influenced the anti-paganism policy of several late Roman emperors including Gratian, Valentinian II and Theodosius I. Under tyhe influence of Saint Ambrose
Galla (wife of Theodosius I) (1,319 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
previously married to Marina Severa. The only known child of that marriage was Gratian, Western Roman Emperor from 375 to his assassination on 25 August 383.
Florianus (427 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Gratianopolis (Mauretania Caesariensis) (130 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a city in Mauretania Caesariensis, North Africa, named for the emperor Gratian. It is only known from mentions in church council minutes. Its history
De fide (252 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For De Fide written by Ambrose of Milan for the Emperor Gratian, see Ambrose. De fide (of the faith) is a "theological note" or "theological qualification"
Arona, Piedmont (724 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(UTC+1)  • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2) Postal code 28041 Dialing code 0322 Patron saint Sts. Felinus and Gratian Saint day March 13 Website Official website
Canon law (2,628 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Doctor of Canon Law Doctor of both laws Ecclesiastical court Fetha Negest Gratian (jurist) Ius remonstrandi Licentiate of Canon Law Religious law Rule According
383 (545 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Italian provinces and Hispania proclaim loyalty to him. August 25 – Emperor Gratian, age 24, is assassinated at Lugdunum (modern Lyon), leaving a young widow
Eugenius (653 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
restoration of the Altar of Victory within the Curia (removed by Emperor Gratian). This religious policy created tension with Theodosius and the powerful
Andronikos V Palaiologos (170 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Richomeres (369 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Around the years 377/378, Richomeres was Comes domesticorum of Emperor Gratian and was transferred from Gaul to Thracia, where he was involved in the
Meletius of Antioch (1,535 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
bring matters to a head, and succeeded in persuading the western emperor, Gratian, to convoke one in Rome. A number of western metropolitans assembled there
Arbogast (general) (3,615 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
joined the Roman imperial military service under the command of the emperor Gratian, son of Valentinian I and elder brother to Valentinian II, in the Western
Bartholomew Iscanus (1,287 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
extensively. This was based on the works of Ivo of Chartres, Burchard of Worms, Gratian, and Peter Lombard, among other authors. Besides his penitential, Bartholomew
Council of Clermont (535) (229 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
contained in the Decretum Gratiani compiled in the twelfth century by Gratian; they have become part of the corpus of canon law of the Catholic Church
Constantine III (Western Roman Emperor) (1,630 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Immortal Emperors, Pier 9, ISBN 978-1-74196-598-8  C.E. Stevens, "Marcus, Gratian, Constantine", Athenaeum, 35 (1957), pp. 316–47 E.A. Thompson, "Britain
Council of Clermont (535) (229 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
contained in the Decretum Gratiani compiled in the twelfth century by Gratian; they have become part of the corpus of canon law of the Catholic Church
Smith Life Master Women's Pairs (247 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
to present Year Winners Runners-up 1961  Dorothy Hayden, Helen Portugal Gratian Goldstein, Jane Mueller 1962 Barbara Kachmar, Margaret Wagar Anne Burnstein
Coventina (636 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
thick. The contents of the well included 13487 coins from Mark Anthony to Gratian, a relief of three water nymphs, the head of a male statue, two dedication
Justina (empress) (1,602 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
could espouse Justina, without repudiating Severa, as she had borne him Gratian, whom he had created Augustus a little while before. He accordingly framed
Sextus Claudius Petronius Probus (752 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
383-384; in the meantime, he held the consulship in 371, with Emperor Gratian as colleague. In 372 he defended Sirmium against barbarian attack and in
List of Roman triumphal arches (133 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Celsus, Rome Italy MUR, p. 10. Arch of Theodosius I, Valentinian I, and Gratian After 1400s Near Ponte Sant'Angelo, Rome Italy MUR, p. 11. Arch of Titus
Family tree of Roman emperors (133 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
331-363-364                       Constantia 361–383   Gratian 359-367-383   Aelia Flaccilla d. 385   Theodosius I 347-379-395
Comes Britanniarum (275 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
frontier guard commanded by the other two. The first comes in Britain was Gratian the Elder, the father of emperor Valentinian I, who commanded the British
1545 (827 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
May 22 – Karl Christoph, Duke of Münsterberg (d. 1569) June 6 – Jerome Gratian, Spanish Carmelite and writer (d. 1614) June 13 – Naitō Nobunari, Samurai
Domitian (13,094 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Bernardus Papiensis (273 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
canonical texts comprising ancient canons not inserted in the "Decretum" of Gratian and also later documents. The work was compiled between 1187 and 1191,
Carpophorus, Exanthus, Cassius, Severinus, Secundus, and Licinius (246 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
in turn venerated at Arona with two other soldier saints, Felinus and Gratian, on a joint feast day of March 13. Alban Butler, Peter Doyle, Butler’s
Philippikos Bardanes (400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Paulinus of Nola (1,728 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
senatorial class did not last long. In 375 the Emperor Gratian succeeded his father Valentinian. Gratian made Paulinus suffect consul at Rome ca. 377, and
Maximian (6,848 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Restoration and tolerance of Paganism from Julian till Valens (1,032 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
preceded by persecutions by Constantius II and followed by those by Emperor Gratian. Under the sole rule of Julian the Apostate from 361 to 363, Paganism saw
Regular clergy (640 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
canons regular to distinguish them from monks. Thus the collection of Gratian (about 1139) speaks of canons regular, who make canonical profession, and
Michael IX Palaiologos (325 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Pope Benedict IX (888 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
godfather, the pious priest John Gratian, persuaded Benedict to resign the papacy for a sum of money, thus allowing Gratian to become Pope Gregory VI. Some
Western Roman Empire (5,554 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
from 361 to 363 Jovian: 363 to 364 Valentinian I: 364 to 375 Gratian: 367 to 375 Gratian: 375 to 383 Valentinian II: 375 to 383 Magnus Maximus: 383 to
Andronikos IV Palaiologos (446 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Flavius Valerius Severus (310 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Leo II (emperor) (125 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Gregorian Reform (1,087 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(1965). ""Simoniaca haeresis" and the problem of orders from Leo IX to Gratian". Proceedings of the Second International Congress of Medieval Canon Law
Matthew Kantakouzenos (412 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Elagabalus (5,691 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Quintillus (593 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
1976 African Cup of Nations (159 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dire Dawa Stadium, Dire Dawa Referee: Gratian Matovu (Tanzania)
Summa Parisiensis (74 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
written in the 12th century as a legal textbook by the jurist known as Gratian. S. Kuttner, Repertorium der Kanonistik (1140-1234): Prodromus corporis
Constantius II (5,622 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
posthumous daughter named Flavia Maxima Constantia, who later married Emperor Gratian. Constantius seems to have had a particular interest in the religious
Roman Emperor (Dominate) (2,388 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
364 – 375 Valentinian I, 364 – 375 Gratian, 367 – 375 (as "Imp. Caesar Flavius Gratianus P.F. Aug.") Gratian ("Imp. Caesar Flavius Gratianus P.F. Aug
John V Palaiologos (912 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Fidelis of Como (479 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
festival was extended to include the celebration for the martyrs Felinus and Gratian, thereby uniting their cult to that of Carpophorus and Fidelis. At Milan
Pope Anastasius II (985 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Wisconsin Press. ISBN 978-0-299-03944-8. Retrieved 8 March 2013.  Gratian; Augustine Thompson; Katherine Christensen (1993). The Treatise on Laws
Aix-les-Bains (624 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
even before it was renamed Aquae Gratianae to commemorate the Emperor Gratian, who was assassinated not far away, in Lyon, in 383. Numerous Roman ruins
Antonio Agustín y Albanell (299 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emendatione Gratiani dialogorum libri duo (1587), a textual criticism of the Gratian Decree Epitome iuris pontificii veteris (1587/1611), a compendium of canon
Guido de Baysio (457 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
patron Baysio dedicated his chief work, a commentary on the Decretum of Gratian, which he wrote about the year 1300 and entitled Rosarium Decretorum. It
Middle Ages (20,729 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Western Europe. Canon law was also studied, and around 1140 a monk named Gratian (fl. 12th century), a teacher at Bologna, wrote what became the standard
Arcadius (765 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
1140 (248 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
rapid expansion in the region in the following 15 years. Camaldolite monk Gratian founds the science of Canon law with the publication of the Decretum Gratiani
360s (1,910 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
banished to Mauretania for harbouring the usurper Procopius. August 4 – Gratian receives the title of Augustus under his father, Valentinian I. Winter
Sirmium (1,612 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Probus (276–82) Maximianus Herculius (285–310) Constantius II (337–61) Gratian (367–83) The last emperor of the united Roman Empire, Theodosius I (378–95)
Seal of the Confessional and the Catholic Church (937 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
learn from penitents during the course of the Sacrament of Penance. Gratian, who compiled the edicts of previous Catholic Ecumenical Councils and the
Nonius Atticus Maximus (159 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
prefect of Italy between 383 and 384 and then Consul in 397. In 383 Emperor Gratian died, and his half-brother Valentinian II become the only Emperor. He then
Felino Maria Sandeo (243 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Felinus" redirects here. For the saint of this name, see Felinus and Gratian. Felino Maria Sandeo (1444–1503), often quoted under the Latin name of Felinus
Valentinian III (3,364 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
                                28. Gratian the Elder               14. Valentinian I        
History of the Roman Empire (13,109 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was another concern. The death of Valens left Gratian and Valentinian II as the sole two Augusti. Gratian was now effectively responsible for the whole
Leoparda (225 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
gynecologist who served in the Court of Gratian (359–383). Information about Leoparda comes from a book by Emperor Gratian’s physician Priscian that he wrote
Anselm of Lucca (714 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
afterwards were incorporated into the well-known Decretum of the jurist Gratian. He died in Mantua on March 18, 1086, and is regarded as the patron saint
History of the Roman Empire (13,109 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was another concern. The death of Valens left Gratian and Valentinian II as the sole two Augusti. Gratian was now effectively responsible for the whole
Leoparda (225 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
gynecologist who served in the Court of Gratian (359–383). Information about Leoparda comes from a book by Emperor Gratian’s physician Priscian that he wrote
Age of consent (4,534 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
marriage, which at the time was 12 years of age. In the 12th century, Gratian, the influential founder of Canon law in medieval Europe, accepted age
Justin I (990 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Scourge (838 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
century in all monasteries of the severe Columban rule. Canon law (Decree of Gratian, Decretals of Gregory IX) recognized it as a punishment for ecclesiastics;
John VIII Palaiologos (598 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Pannonia Prima (558 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
easily defensible; thus, there were few forts lining that border. Emperor Gratian (367-383) began settling Huns as foederati in Pannonia. Roman money had
Magnentius (485 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Desmoplakin (1,474 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1.143. PMID 9887343.  Whittock NV, Ashton GH, Dopping-Hepenstal PJ, Gratian MJ, Keane FM, Eady RA et al. (1999). "Striate palmoplantar keratoderma
Hypatius (consul 359) (467 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hypatius was still in Antioch when he received notification from the emperor Gratian of his appointment as Praefectus urbi of Rome, shortly after the Battle
Michael VII Doukas (1,030 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
2001 Caribbean Cup (68 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Stade Georges Gratian Fort-de-France, Martinique
Constantine VI (671 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Romanos III Argyros (512 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Gothic War (376–382) (910 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
moved north into Pannonia where they were defeated by western emperor Gratian. The Tervingi under Fritigern moved south and east to Macedonia, where
Marcus Aurelius Probus (842 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Constantine II (emperor) (648 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Fall of the Western Roman Empire (13,517 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Germanic leaders; his sons Gratian (r. 375–383) and Valentinian II (r. 375–392) succeeded him in the West. Both were children. Gratian, "alien from the art
Isaac I Komnenos (906 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
List of Roman emperors (2,141 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
9, 378 AD Killed in Battle of Adrianople against the Goths 14 Years Gratian FLAVIVS GRATIANVS AVGVSTVS April 18/May 23, 359 AD, Sirmium, Pannonia Son
Timeline of ancient Rome (4,052 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
empire with his brother Valens. 375– Valentinian dies and is succeeded by Gratian as Western emperor. 378– Valens is defeated and killed by the Goths at
Roman emperor (5,712 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Roman state). Every emperor held the latter office and title until Gratian surrendered it in 382 AD to Pope Siricius; it eventually became an auxiliary
Theodore II Laskaris (618 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Priscillianism (1,538 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Avila. Ithacius then appealed to the imperial authorities. The Emperor Gratian issued a decree which deprived the Priscillianists of their churches and
Nikephoros III Botaneiates (928 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Theodosius III (359 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Constantine VIII (428 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
382 (254 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
furnish a contingent of auxiliary troops to defend the borders. Emperor Gratian refuse the divine attributes of the Imperial cult and removes the Altar
University of Bologna (1,541 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Carlo Severini Guglielmo Marconi 11th century Irnerius 12th century Gratian Patriarch Heraclius of Jerusalem Bulgarus Martinus Gosia William of Tyre
Alexios IV Angelos (877 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Romanos II (907 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Trebonianus Gallus (905 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Alexios II Komnenos (653 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
First Council of Constantinople (3,357 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
formally claimed by the new Latin patriarch. The Roman correctores of Gratian, insert the words: "canon hic ex iis est quos apostolica Romana sedes a
Tiberios III (867 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Carus (690 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Marcus Claudius Tacitus (669 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
367 (289 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
banished to Mauretania for harbouring the usurper Procopius. August 4 – Gratian receives the title of Augustus under his father, Valentinian I. Winter
Alexander (Byzantine emperor) (438 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
John VII Palaiologos (685 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Timeline of the Roman Empire (6,669 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
general Valentinian I as Emperor Valentinian I (364-375) Valens (364-378) Gratian (375-383) Valentinian II (375-392) Theodosius I (378-395) 364 - Following
Carinus (557 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Marele câștigător (409 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gramescu, while The Blue Team was coached by trainer Florin Uceanu. The eventual winner of the $25,000 grand prize was Grațian. Grațian Stan Ruxandra
Constantine X Doukas (638 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Numerian (1,111 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Pupienus (1,207 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480
Kings Weston Roman Villa (400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
shoulder suggested that he had died violently. Coins of the Valentinian and Gratian periods led to a conclusion that the man may have died in a Viking raid
Michael VI Bringas (544 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
II Constans I Constantius II Julian Jovian Valentinian the Great Valens Gratian Valentinian II Magnus Maximus Theodosius the Great Western Empire 395–480