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searching for English folklore 173 found (454 total)

alternate case: english folklore

Headless Horseman (1,081 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

The Headless Horseman is a mythical figure who has appeared in folklore around the world since the Middle Ages. The Headless Horseman is traditionally
Shellycoat (420 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Scottish and Northern English folklore, a shellycoat is a type of bogeyman that haunts rivers and streams. The name comes from the coat of shells these
Barghest (872 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
In Northern English folklore, the Barghest or Barguest is a mythical monstrous black dog with large teeth and claws, though in other cases the name can
David of Doncaster (211 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
David of Doncaster is a member of Robin Hood's Merry Men in English folklore. Doncaster is a town near Barnsdale, where early ballads placed Robin Hood
Will Stutely (301 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Will Stutely or Will Stutly is in English folklore a prominent member of Robin Hood's Merry Men. He was possibly confused with Will Scarlet because of
Arthur a Bland (390 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Arthur a Bland is, in English folklore, a member of Robin Hood's Merry Men, though his chief appearance is in the ballad in which he joins the band. Arthur
List of water deities (2,645 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A water deity is a deity in mythology associated with water or various bodies of water. Water deities are common in mythology and were usually more important
Alyas Robin Hood (670 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
action series broadcast by GMA Network. The series was inspired by the English folklore, Robin Hood. Directed by Dominic Zapata, it stars Dingdong Dantes in
First-foot (596 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
In Scottish and Northern English folklore, the first-foot (Scottish Gaelic: ciad-chuairt, Manx: quaaltagh/qualtagh) is the first person to enter the home
Mab (moon) (480 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Space Telescope. It was named after Queen Mab, a fairy queen from English folklore who is mentioned in William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet. Because
Vaughan Williams Memorial Library (437 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
dance traditions in the British Isles. According to A Dictionary of English Folklore, "... by a gradual process of professionalization the VWML has become
Easter Bunny (1,125 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
BBC documentary Shadow of the Hare (1993). The Oxford Dictionary of English Folklore however states "... there is no shred of evidence" that hares were
The Entertainment at Althorp (394 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
fairies and elves — a blending of figures from both classical and native English folklore that Jonson would employ in future works as well (see, for example
Issun-bōshi (3,553 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
known elsewhere in the world, as in the tradition of Tom Thumb in English folklore. The general story is: A childless old couple prayed to the Sumiyoshi
Faxlore (1,622 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Xerox Corporation. The first use of this term came in A Dictionary of English Folklore by Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud. Achtung! Alles turisten und nonteknischen
Rosamund Clifford (2,032 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
her beauty and was a mistress of King Henry II of England, famous in English folklore. Rosamund is believed to have been the daughter of the marcher lord
Three crows (644 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Three crows are a symbol or metaphor in several traditions. Crows, and especially ravens, often feature in European legends or mythology as portents or
Grand Tour (Big Big Train album) (389 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
previously having a largely domestic British focus. It moves from English folklore and landscape, to the 17th and 18th century habit of well-to-do Europeans
Moonlight (655 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
47.4981M. doi:10.1364/AO.47.004981. PMID 18806861. A Dictionary of English Folklore, Oxford University Press, 2000 Gessner, Conrad (1555). Descriptio Montis
Gryphaea arcuata (60 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gryphaeidae from the Early Jurassic of Europe. It is commonly referred to in English folklore as the 'devils toenail' due to its supposed resemblance to the devil's
The Witches and the Grinnygog (165 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
surviving into the modern world, and deals with various themes related to English folklore, ghosts and time slips. When an ancient English church is moved to
Ring a Ring o' Roses (2,674 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
 1518. 20 March 2020. p. 21. J. Simpson and S. Roud, A Dictionary of English Folklore (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000), p. 296. Opie and Opie (1985)
Sprite (folklore) (340 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
ISBN 978-0-525-47041-0. Simpson, Jacqueline (2000). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0198607663. Swedish Myths
Joan the Wad (314 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Trübner & Co. Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Steve (2000). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0192100191. Northall
Stanion (207 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
actually part of the skeleton of a Dun Cow. This was a fabled beast from English folklore, and according to various versions of the story the Stanion cow was
Tom Hickathrift (586 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sometimes Jack Hickathrift) is a legendary figure of East Anglian English folklore — a character similar to Jack the Giant Killer. He famously battled
Vedmak (272 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
("knowledge; witchcraft", compare the use of the term "cunning" in English folklore). Under the influence of The Witcher fantasy saga by Andrzej Sapkowski
Freybug (244 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Freybug is a monstrous Black Dog that is stated to come from medieval English folklore, specifically from Norfolk. Like most supernatural black dogs, it was
Yule log (2,187 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
include the Yule fire and Yule candle). According to the Dictionary of English Folklore, although the concept of Yule extends far into the ancient Germanic
Bisterne (513 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1944. Today the site is covered by fields. Bisterne is notable in English folklore for being the supposed location of a dragon-slaying. The local tradition
Legendary creature (946 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 9780520051928. table. Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Steve (2000). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780192100191. Retrieved 24 March 2013
Notes and Queries (605 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Jacqueline Simpson (Editor), Steve Roud (Editor) (2003). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford University Press Peacock, Max. The Peacock Lincolnshire word
Teksty z Ulicy (257 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was published in 1995 with a subtitle of Zeszyt folklorystyczny (English: folklore issue), under the editorship of Dionizjusz Czubala and his wife Marianna
Puck (moon) (752 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
around the globe at night with the fairies. In Celtic mythology and English folklore, a Puck is a mischievous sprite, imagined as an evil demon by Christians
Home (2,535 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
idea that an Englishman's home is his castle is firmly embedded in English folklore and it finds its counterpart in the common law of the realm..." "Home"
Archway, London (1,298 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
stone protected by railings. On top of the thick tablet, his cat of English folklore is cast in stone. A restored 1821 memorial stone topped with a small
Endymion (play) (2,139 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Lyly makes allusions to ancient Greek and Roman texts and traditional English folklore throughout the play. While the title and characters are references
Green children of Woolpit (3,304 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Jacqueline; Roud, Steve (2000), "Green Children", A Dictionary of English Folklore (online ed.), Oxford University Press, retrieved 5 April 2009 Lawton
Rabbit rabbit rabbit (1,694 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
(custom) Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Stephen (2000). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780192100191. Citing Notes and Queries
Outlaw (novel) (571 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Sherwood Forest under the tutelage of the most notorious outlaw in English folklore. A few days later it emerges that Robin was close friends with Alan's
Myth (7,779 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Jacqueline, and Steve Roud, eds. 2003. "Myths." In A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780191726644. Doniger O'Flaherty
Songs from the Wood (song) (604 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
rural environment. Our PR guy, Jo Lustig, had given me a book about English folklore as a Christmas present, and I thumbed through it and found lots of
Nabi Bakhsh Baloch (3,468 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
forty-two volumes on Sindhi Folklore, with scholarly prefaces in English, 'Folklore and Literature Project' Sindhi Adabi Board. In addition, he compiled
River Tees (1,872 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Nuclear Power Station is adjacent to the east. Peg Powler is a hag in English folklore who is said to inhabit the River Tees. The River Tees was featured
List of legendary creatures (O) (396 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
wolf that follows travelers at night, similar to the Black dog of English folklore Ole-Higue (Guyanese) - Vampiric hag who takes the form of a fireball
Black cat (2,891 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
the original on 2011-09-28. Retrieved 2011-09-26. "A Dictionary of English Folklore". Oxford University Press. 2000. Retrieved 2009-11-25. Eyers, Jonathan
Outlaw (1,910 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A statue of Robin Hood, a heroic outlaw in English folklore
Cockle bread (724 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-0-485-11393-8. Jacqueline Simpson; Stephen Roud (2000). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford University Press. p. 211. ISBN 978-0-19-210019-1. Brand, John
Gytrash (horse) (468 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Morphettville in South Australia. He is named after the legendary spirit of English folklore, the Gytrash that is said to take form of a horse, mule or dog. Gytrash
List of legendary creatures from Japan (3,256 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
travelers, attacking them if they trip. Similar to the Black dog of English folklore. Ōmagatoki – Dusk. Ōmukade – A giant, human-eating centipede that lives
Something old (1,490 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ward against evil done by frustrated suitors. An 1898 compilation of English folklore recounted that: In this country an old couplet directs that the bride
Jumping stilts (716 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
falls, though such devices might not actually work in real life. An English folklore figure, spring-heeled Jack, has been conjectured by some investigators
Canadian folklore (2,014 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 9781897425596. Simpson, Jacqueline; Stephen Roud (2000). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford University Press. p. J. ISBN 9780192100191. Butts, Edward (2010)
Lob (84 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
college football player Lob (haircut), a haircut Lob, a synonym for the English folklore creature the lubber fiend "Lob", archaic English word for "spider"
Thumbling (1,717 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"Tom Thumb" in 1823, pointed out that the character is paralleled in English folklore by Tom Thumb as well as Tam Lin. Thumberling was born after only 7
Willow (3,998 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
grows. Willow trees are also quite prevalent in folklore and myths. In English folklore, a willow tree is believed to be quite sinister, capable of uprooting
Burley, Hampshire (1,350 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
coins, and other unusual items were discovered. Burley is notable in English folklore for the supposed location of a dragon's lair at Burley Beacon, just
Outlaw (stock character) (1,467 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
known to history. — Eric Hobsbawm The stereotype owes a great deal to English folklore precedents, in the tales of Robin Hood and of gallant highwaymen. But
Giant (3,756 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Dietrich himself and his fellow heroes also became giants. Many giants in English folklore were noted for their stupidity. A giant who had quarreled with the
Erlking (1,132 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
not from "elf-king" but from the name of Herla, a figure in medieval English folklore, adapted as Herlequin, Hellequin in medieval French, in origin the
Saint David's Day (1,941 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
2013. Simpson, Jacqueline and Steve Roud (2000), Oxford Dictionary of English Folklore, Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 307–8. Thomas, Guto (1 March
We wunt be druv (920 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
(link) Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Stephen (2003). A Dictionary of English Folklore. London: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780198607663.CS1 maint: ref=harv
Gorna Oryahovitsa (1,523 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bulgarian and English) History of Gorna Oryahovitsa (in Bulgarian, German, French, Russian, and English) Folklore Company Sider Voivoda (in English)
University of Houston College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (412 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anthropology, Communication, Communication Sciences & Disorders, Economics, English, Folklore, Hispanic Studies, History, Modern & Classical Languages, Philosophy
Russell Crowe (6,189 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) BBC. 30 June 2006. "English folklore brings Crowe back to Wales". The Leader. Wales. 5 May 2010. Archived
Puca (66 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
mountain in Peru Puck (mythology), fairy or mischievous nature sprite in English folklore (possibly related to Púca) Florin Pucă (1932–1990), Romanian graphic
Peter Blake (artist) (2,075 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
live near Bath. His work changed direction to feature scenes based on English Folklore and characters from Shakespeare. In the early 1970s, he made a set
Jumping the broom (3,372 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
"jumping the broomstick"’ J.G. Whitehead, M. Terry, B. Aitken, ‘Scraps of English Folklore, XII’ (1926) 37 Folklore 76; Sheila Stewart, Lifting the Latch: A Life
Alice Gomme (348 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud, 'Gomme, Alice Bertha', A Dictionary of English Folklore (Oxford: OUP, 2000), 148-9 Works written by or about Alice Gomme at
Rowan (3,132 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
reported traditions of rowan's apotropaic powers against witches in English folklore, citing the Denham Tracts (collected between 1846 and 1859). Rowan
Knocking on wood (1,680 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
spoken acknowledgment, as well as preventing envy. (Citation) In old English folklore, "knocking on wood" also referred to when people spoke of secrets –
Frost (3,299 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Russia such as the Mordvins have their own traditions of frost deities. English folklore tradition holds that Jack Frost, an elfish creature, is responsible
Merman (2,735 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Jacqueline; Roud, Stephen (2000), "mermaid, merman", A Dictionary of English Folklore, Oxford University Press, pp. 639–640, ISBN 0-192-10019-X Briggs, Katharine
List of hobbies (6,292 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Stephen (2 November 2000). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780192100191. Asch, David;
St. Xavier's College, Palayamkottai (605 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
mathematics, and zoology. The doctorate (PhD) is offered in Tamil, English, folklore and communication, commerce, mathematics, physics, chemistry, computer
Barley (7,578 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
cultivation as an ornamental and pot plant for pet cats to nibble. In English folklore, the figure of John Barleycorn in the folksong of the same name is
Paramahamsa (840 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
have mockingly translated hamsa as 'goose' in particular, because in English folklore a goose (the domesticated type) traditionally denotes foolishness and
Brothers Grimm (6,772 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-0-670-02497-1. Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Steve (2000). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-210019-1. Quotations related
Bee (9,943 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bernard Mandeville and Karl Marx as a model for human society. In English folklore, bees would be told of important events in the household, in a custom
Nachzehrer (648 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
doing so. Draugr (Norse mythology and Scandinavian folklore) Revenant (English folklore) Bunson, Matthew (1993). The Vampire Encyclopedia, p. 185,186, Gramercy
Werewolf (8,669 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
retelling the story from 1935 onwards and not in earlier versions. English folklore, prior to 1865, showed shapeshifters to be vulnerable to silver. "
Samurai Jack (4,312 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
based on the story of how Robin Hood and Little John became friends in English folklore. The network announced the series' launch at a press conference on
Wiccan Rede (1,987 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
least part of the poem is probable. He argues that its references to English folklore are consistent with Porter's family history. His provisional conclusion
Lyndhurst, Hampshire (2,460 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
as a memorial to Marie-Louise Souberbielle. Lyndhurst is notable in English folklore for being the supposed location of a dragon-slaying. The local tradition
Wildwood Discovery Park (1,044 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
adaptation, homes and habitats through to animals in Viking myths and English folklore, as well as running an informal public education programme including
Violet Alford (177 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Steve, eds. (2003), "Alford, Violet (1881–1972)", Oxford Dictionary of English Folklore (online ed.), Oxford University Press, retrieved 12 February 2018
Fossil (8,988 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
garner Thor's protection. These grew into the shepherd's crowns of English folklore, used for decoration and as good luck charms, placed by the doorway
Folk play (345 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"National Centre for English Cultural Tradition". A dictionary of English folklore. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780198607663. Retrieved 23 January
Lies, damned lies, and statistics (1,822 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
individual in Simpson, J. & Roud, S., Editors (2003). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.[verification needed] Post Staff
Father's Day (6,560 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Wayback Machine Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Steve (2000). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 120. ISBN 0-19-969104-5. "7 Ideas
Dun (disambiguation) (371 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
enumeration comma, a Chinese punctuation mark Dun Cow, a brown bovine; a common motif in English folklore Dunn (disambiguation) River Dun (disambiguation)
Pedro Miguel (450 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
23 June 1977, the Grupo Folclórico e Etnográfico de Pedro Miguel (English: Folklore and Ethnographic Group of Pedro Miguel) was established to perpetuate
Robin of Loxley (22 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Robin of Loxley may refer to: Robin Hood, a heroic outlaw in English folklore Joe Van Moyland (b. 1983), a British musician
Haná (553 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 1 November 2012. (in English) Central Moravia (in Czech) Folklore from Haná (in English) Folklore group Hanačka (in Czech) about the Haná dialect
Eliza Gutch (376 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Jacqueline Simpson (Editor), Steve Roud (Editor) (2003). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford University Press Peacock, Max. The Peacock Lincolnshire word
Folklore of India (2,672 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
studies. Rudyard Kipling was interested in folklore, dealing with English folklore in works such as Puck of Pook's Hill and Rewards and Fairies; his experiences
Fenodyree (2,188 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
have pointed out that the fenodyree is akin to Lob Lie-By-The-Fire in English folklore, also known as "Lubber Fiend" from Milton. A character in The Weirdstone
Britannia Coconut Dancers (1,236 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hastings House, p. 26 "Bacup Britannia Coconut Dancers", A dictionary of English folklore, Oxford University Press, 2000, ISBN 978-0-19-210019-1 "Dança do Coco"
St Mary-at-Hill (1,484 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
popular venue for its regular concerts and recitals. In several books on English folklore, or about ceremonies of London, there is mention of the Costermongers'
Sir Christèmas (329 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Simpson and Stephen Roud, Jacqueline (2003). The Oxford Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford: Oxford University Press. "New Publications, July 1941-December
St. Clement's Day (1,018 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
J & Roud, S; Dictionary of English Folklore (2000), Oxford University Press. Wright, A.R. & Lones, T.E.; English Folklore (1940), Folklore Society "Song
Music of Argentina (3,737 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Folk music—called música folklórica or folklore in Spanish, from the English folklore—comes in many forms, developed in different parts of Argentina with
Jack-o'-lantern (disambiguation) (125 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
turnip. associated with Halloween Jack-o'-lantern may also refer to: In English folklore, jack-o'-lantern is an alternative term for will-o'-the-wisp or ignis
Frank Kidson (404 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
OUP, 2004, online ed. 2006) J. Simpson and S. Roud, A Dictionary of English Folklore, (Oxford: OUP, 2000), 204. Works by Frank Kidson at Faded Page (Canada)
Communal work (3,845 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anthropology 21:2 pp.317.335 (July 2016) "Folklore.PanamaTipico.com (English)". folklore.panamatipico.com. Retrieved 2018-10-30. The Australian Bosses roll
Joseph Wright (linguist) (1,472 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
ISBN 0-86197-129-9. Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Steve (2000). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0198607663. (extract) Snaith
Gog and Magog (7,882 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
 1. Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Stephen (2000), Oxford Dictionary of English Folklore, Oxford University Press, Gogmagog (or Gog and Magog), ISBN 9780192100191
Ian Serraillier (698 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
children, in prose and verse, including Beowulf, works by Chaucer, English folklore, and Greek and Roman myths. In 1948, together with his wife, Anne Margaret
Edwin Sidney Hartland (188 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
particular interest in education. "Edwin Sidney Hartland", A Dictionary of English Folklore, Oxford University Press, 2003 Haddon, A. C. (Jun 30, 1926). "In Memoriam:
Catwings (1,453 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
featuring "a feline descendant of Dick Whittington's famous cat of English folklore", OCLC 55131439 The Story of Salt, Mark Kurlansky (G. P. Putnam's Sons
Struwwelpeter (2,518 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(June–July 2006), by Simon Spurrier and Lee Garbett, explores bogeymen from English folklore and mythology wreaking havoc in a modern-day setting. Two of the characters
Folklore of the United States (6,572 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
cited as an Indian legend, the white doe seems to have its roots in English folklore. White deer are common in English legends and often used as symbols
English language in Northern England (3,182 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
CITEREFTrudgill2002 (help) Roud, Steve; Simpson, Jacqueline (2000). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford University Press. p. 324. ISBN 0-19-210019-X "The Celtic Linguistic
The Downfall and The Death of Robert Earl of Huntington (1,452 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
bends "in a tragic direction." The story of Robin Hood was integral to English folklore, and Munday was far from the first or only dramatist of his time to
Sidney Oldall Addy (194 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Steve. "Addy, Sidney Oldall". A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-210019-1. OCLC 44737169
Woolpit (1,706 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Jacqueline; Roud, Steve (2000), "Green Children", A Dictionary of English Folklore ((subscription or UK public library membership required)) (online ed
Gervase of Tilbury (1,028 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. Charles Oman, "The English Folklore of Gervase of Tilbury" Folklore 55.1 (March 1944, pp. 2-15) p. 2. Catholic
Early modern period (13,688 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
during his military operations in Flanders became part of Dutch and English folklore, forming a central component of the Spanish Black Legend. In England
Steve Roud (679 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Reference Award the year before. (with Jacqueline Simpson) A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2000. ISBN 019210019X. (with Eddie
Castleton Garland Day (867 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
ISBN 978-1850752431 Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Stephen (2000), A Dictionary of English Folklore, Oxford: Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-192-10019-1 Hutton, Ronald
Nocturnal enuresis (5,349 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Archived from the original on 2007-07-17. Retrieved 2007-07-10. "English folklore". Archived from the original on 2009-06-15. "Benefits of herbal tea"
Scottish independence (9,043 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
who petitioned the Pope and other foreign rulers. A popular myth in English folklore was that Britain had been founded by Brutus of Troy, who had left England
Suzette Doctolero (1,757 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
said that Alyas Robin Hood is based on the legend of Robin Hood, an English folklore, and not based on Arrow. She also further explained that the story
Spring-Heeled Jim (220 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
be based upon Spring-heeled Jack, a semi-fantastical character from English folklore, alleged sightings and lurid press reports said to be able to make
Shifnal (4,997 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Romanticism, highlighting the simpler, less artificial traditions of English folklore. It inspired folklore collections and movements in other parts of Europe
Cotswold Olimpick Games (3,584 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Steve (2000), "church ales", A Dictionary of English Folklore (online ed.), Oxford University Press, retrieved 1 July 2010 (subscription
Ashen faggot (630 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Cultural aspects of the ash tree Ashen Faggot at the Oxford Dictionary of English Folklore Retrieved 26 June 2013 Ashen Faggot Retrieved 26 June 2013 Ashen Faggot
Hen Ogledd (4,661 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Niemeyer, p. 145 Koch 2006, p. 516. Koch 2006, p. 517. A Dictionary of English Folklore, Jacqueline Simpson, Stephen Roud, Oxford University Press, 2000, ISBN 0-19-210019-X
East L.A. walkouts (3,074 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
society. Textbooks should concentrate on Mexican folklore rather than English folklore. All administrators where schools have majority of Chicano descent
Royal Shrovetide Football (4,843 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
December 2012. Jacqueline Simpson; Stephen Roud (2000). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford University Press. p. 39. ISBN 978-0-19-210019-1. "Old Firm's
Christmas music (13,213 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Village". Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Steve (2000). Oxford Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford. p. 64. "Bach - Christmas Oratorio". Classic FM. Archived from
Robert (9,528 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hood, legendary heroic outlaw and nobleman originally depicted in English folklore, highly skilled archer and swordsman, sometimes regarded as one of
England, England (1,365 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
these myths. For the sake of simplification, however, in the novel old English folklore, customs and legends, but also historical facts, are altered to fit
Association for Mormon Letters (2,876 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John S. Tanner 1986–1988 BYU English William A. Wilson 1988–1989 BYU English (folklore), d. 2016 Levi Peterson 1989–1990 Weber State English Bruce Jorgensen
Stanley Holloway (6,772 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
obituary of Holloway, The Times wrote that Sam and Albert "became part of English folklore during the 1930s, and they remained so during the Second World War
Theo Brown (641 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Mistletoe Series No. 12. Folklore Society, London. 1978 The Black Dog in English Folklore,' in Animals in Folklore. J.R. Porter and W.M.S. Russell, eds. Mistletoe
List of works based on Arthurian legends (7,038 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
setting integrates Malory with post-Roman Britain, Celtic myth and English Folklore. In Rifts from Palladium Books, the main story of Britain revolves
Drama Köprüsü (427 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
where he lived as a bandit. He was more or less like Robin Hood of English folklore. He robbed the rich and supported the poor. Before becoming a bandit
Hiring and mop fairs (1,085 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Stephen. "Hiring Fairs". A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 177–178. ISBN 0-1921-0019-X.
Laurence Gomme (666 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Simpson and Steve Roud, "Gomme, George Laurence", A Dictionary of English Folklore, Oxford: OUP 2000, 149–50. ISBN 0-19-860766-0. Works by Laurence Gomme
Alastair Cook (15,343 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cook tames Australia in their own back yard and nurdles his way into English folklore". The Daily Telegraph. UK. Archived from the original on 21 January
Hand of Glory (3,491 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
September 2011. Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Stephen (2000). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 455–456. ISBN 9780192100191.
Diplolepis rosae (1,862 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
'wind-brought'. Robin in Robin's pincushion refers to the woodland sprite of English folklore, Robin Goodfellow.[full citation needed] The female insects are about
Talking tree (1,014 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and its film adaptations feature the Huorns and Old Man Willow. In English folklore, willows were said to stalk humans.[citation needed] The novel A Spell
Barbara Freire-Marreco (362 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
articles in its journal, for which she continued to contribute 'Scraps of English folklore', correspondence, and a 1959 study of "processes of localization and
Lucy Broadwood (1,856 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
OUP, 2004, online ed. 2008) J. Simpson and S. Roud, A Dictionary of English Folklore, (Oxford: OUP, 2000), 35. R. Vaughan Williams, "Lucy Broadwood, 1858-1929"
Janet Blunt (207 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Morris Meditations Simpson, Janet and Steve Roud. A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford University Press:2000 Vaughan Williams Memorial Library of
H. Balfour Gardiner (714 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Collections; London; 2007 pp xvi–xvii J. Simpson and S. Roud, A Dictionary of English Folklore (Oxford: OUP, 2000), 140. Lloyd, Stephen. H Balfour Gardiner (2005)
Willy Howe (714 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
resignatum est Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Steve (2000). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford University Press. Willy Howe. ISBN 0-19-210019-X. Hone, William
Bull running (1,421 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Theater Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Stephen (2000), A Dictionary of English Folklore, Oxford: Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-192-10019-1 Walsh, Martin
The Fairy Feller's Master-Stroke (846 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
picture is given a name and purpose—including myriad references to old English folklore and Shakespeare—in an apparent attempt to show that the painting's
Tutbury bull run (1,219 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Jacqueline; Roud, Steve (1 January 2003). "Bull-running". A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/acref/9780198607663.001
Court of Minstrels (1,235 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Jacqueline; Roud, Steve (1 January 2003). "Bull-running". A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/acref/9780198607663.001
Tom Cox (writer) (449 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
"21st-Century Yokel by Tom Cox review – entertaining ramble through English folklore". The Observer. Retrieved 13 December 2017. https://www.amazon.co
Wybunbury Moss (425 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
You... If You Don't Watch Out, by John Bailey and Rose Quigley. In English folklore, the moss is also said to be the home to a headless horseman and 'Ginny
Abbotsbury Garland Day (337 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Jacqueline; Roud, Steve (2000). "Abbotsbury garland day". A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford University Press. pp. 14–15. ISBN 0-19-210019-X. Archived from
List of Alyas Robin Hood episodes (4,261 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Karibal. According to its producers the series was inspired by the English folklore Robin Hood. Urban Luzon and NUTAM (Nationwide Urban Television Audience
Hobby horse (7,372 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Granada, ISBN 0-586-08293-X Alford, Violet (1952). Introduction to English Folklore, p57, Bell (no ISBN) Douglas, Mona (ed. Stephen Miller), Manx Folk-Song
James Ralph (2,099 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
In it, he suggested a series of plays that should be done based on English folklore, such as Tom Thumb. Martin Battestin, Kenny, and Okie all agree that
Buddhist mythology (12,775 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
religious legend, not myth." [J. Simpson & S. Roud, "Dictionary of English Folklore," Oxford, 2000, p.254] Pia Brancaccioa1 and Xinru Liu, Dionysus and
Walter Starkie (2,724 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Professor-in-Residence he was assigned to lecture in six Departments (English, Folklore-Mythology, Italian, Music, Spanish-Portuguese, and Theatre). After
Pack Monday Fair (746 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
December 1826. Simpson, Jacqueline; Roud, Steve (2000). A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 312–313. ISBN 0-19-969104-5.
Enid Porter (1,145 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
21 December 1936 Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud, A Dictionary of English Folklore (Oxford University Press, 2003) Curator's Notebooks, Museum of Cambridge
The Folklorist (619 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Burning of Washington in the War of 1812, and an eerie legend in English folklore. Includes "campfire" segments on Thomas Edison, Gertrude Ederle, and
Heartbound (video game) (1,911 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
finding Baron to be missing. Its namesake is The Barghest of Northern English folklore. Ramul is a quick-witted and quick-footed rabbit who serves as the
Rigby Swift (2,687 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Remembered. London: W & J Mackay & Co Ltd. Hole, Christina (1940). English Folklore. London: B.T.Batsford Ltd. Hansard 1803–2005: contributions in Parliament
List of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen characters (8,590 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Drops Anchor, Mervyn Peake NTA Member of the Pirates' Conference. From English folklore c. 1837 V2S A devil-like figure with an ability to jump great distances
Homer Sykes (3,366 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
after its publication, as remaining "[p]robably the best study of English folklore and ritual". Annie-Laure Wanaverbecq of Maison de la photographie Robert
List of Spanish words of Germanic origin (4,446 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(noun; verb) flotar; flota; flotilla "float" folclore "folklore" (from English folklore) fornido "strong, robust" fornir "provide" forrar "cover" frambuesa
Insufflation (9,623 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Sondra B. Thiederman, 3 vols. (Boston, 1981). T. F. Thiselton-Dyer, English Folklore, 2nd rev. ed. (London, 1880), 170. HddA, loc. cit.; cp. also the Puckett
Insufflation (9,623 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Sondra B. Thiederman, 3 vols. (Boston, 1981). T. F. Thiselton-Dyer, English Folklore, 2nd rev. ed. (London, 1880), 170. HddA, loc. cit.; cp. also the Puckett
Portuguese vocabulary (24,421 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
movie, picture filtro; filtrar flutuar; frota; flotilha folclore (from English Folklore) fornido; fornecido forragem forrar framboesa francês Franco (candid)
List of Portuguese words of Germanic origin (7,810 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
movie, picture filtro; filtrar flutuar; frota; flotilha folclore (from English Folklore) fornido; fornecido forragem forrar framboesa francês franco (candid)