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searching for English Bards and Scotch Reviewers 15 found (34 total)

alternate case: english Bards and Scotch Reviewers

Charlotte Dacre (575 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

one of the numerous targets of Lord Byron's satirical poem English Bards and Scotch Reviewers, mentioned in the lines: Far be't from me unkindly to upbraid
1809 in poetry (782 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
literature (for instance, Irish or France). Lord Byron, "English Bards and Scotch Reviewers", his anonymous response to the Edinburgh Review's attack
Timeline of Lord Byron (1,382 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Davies. 1809 13 March – Took seat in the House of Lords. English Bards and Scotch Reviewers published. 20 June – Travelled to Falmouth with Hobhouse.
James Montgomery (poet) (1,883 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
speedily forgotten, Lord Byron came to its defence in the satire English Bards and Scotch Reviewers. Nevertheless, within 18 months a fourth impression of 1500
George Richards (priest) (474 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
sets of ‘Oxford Prize Poems.’ It was praised by Lord Byron (English Bards and Scotch Reviewers). Richards graduated Bachelor of Arts (BA) on 4 November 1788
Thomas Seaton (369 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
celebrated university prize as "Seaton's sons" in his poem English Bards and Scotch Reviewers (1809). "Seaton, Thomas (STN701T)". A Cambridge Alumni Database
Martin Archer Shee (801 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
part followed in 1809. Lord Byron spoke well of it in his English Bards and Scotch Reviewers. Shee published another small volume of verse in 1814, entitled
William Hayley (705 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Music (Chichester, 1804) it was ridiculed by Byron in English Bards and Scotch Reviewers. In 1805 he published Ballads founded on Anecdotes of Animals
Scotch (adjective) (1,497 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
("National Bard, Scotland's", op. cit.). Thus also Byron: English Bards and Scotch Reviewers ref., 1809). From the early 19th century, however, Scots or
Capel Lofft (856 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
for the publication of that work. Byron, in a note to his English Bards and Scotch Reviewers, ridiculed Lofft as "the Maecenas of shoemakers and preface-writer
Holland House, Kingsgate (1,397 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
memorialised by Falkland's friend Lord Byron in his poem "English Bards and Scotch Reviewers": If mad with loss existence ‘gins to tire, And all your hope
The Eagle Wounded by an Arrow (1,583 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
poets, from Chaucer to Cowper, London 1810, vol.8, p.50 "English Bards and Scotch Reviewers", lines 826ff The Works of Thomas Moore, Paris 1823, Vol.6
Robert Bloomfield (1,541 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Verse, and Other Poems. Byron commented on the brothers in English Bards and Scotch Reviewers (lines 775–786), linking Robert's name favourably with other
George Crabbe (5,808 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
one purring on the hearth." Byron, besides what he said in English Bards and Scotch Reviewers, declared, in 1816, that he considered Crabbe and Coleridge
Alexander Pope (4,245 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(believing his scathing satire of contemporary English literature English Bards and Scotch Reviewers to be a continuance of Pope's tradition), William Wordsworth