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Longer titles found: Music in the Elizabethan era (view)

searching for Elizabethan era 256 found (758 total)

alternate case: elizabethan era

John Hall (physician) (493 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article

John Hall (1575 – 25 November 1635) was a physician and son-in-law of William Shakespeare. He was born at Carlton, Bedfordshire and studied at Queens'
Giles Thomson (249 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Giles Thomson (Tomson, Thompson) (1553–1612) was an English academic and bishop. He was born in London, and educated at Merchant Taylors' School, and to
Henry Parry (bishop of Worcester) (375 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Henry Parry (1561–1616) was an English bishop. He was born in Wiltshire, and came as scholar to Corpus Christi College, Oxford in 1576. He graduated M
George Carleton (bishop) (638 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
George Carleton (1559 – May, 1628) was an English churchman, Bishop of Llandaff (1618–1619). He was a delegate to the Synod of Dort, in the Netherlands
The Merry Devil of Edmonton (591 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Merry Devil of Edmonton is an Elizabethan-era stage play; a comedy about a magician, Peter Fabell, nicknamed the Merry Devil. It was at one point
Fair Em (872 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fair Em, the Miller's Daughter of Manchester, is an Elizabethan-era stage play, a comedy written c. 1590. It was bound together with Mucedorus and The
Godfrey Goodman (749 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Godfrey Goodman, also called Hugh; (28 February 1582 or 1583 – 19 January 1656) was the Anglican Bishop of Gloucester, and a member of the Protestant Church
Robert Rich, 1st Earl of Warwick (372 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Rich, 3rd Baron Rich, 1st Earl of Warwick (December 1559 – 24 March 1619), was an English nobleman, known as Baron Rich between 1581 and 1618, when
John Herbert (Secretary of State) (497 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir John Herbert (1550 – 9 July 1617) was a Welsh lawyer, diplomat and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1586 and 1611
John Fortescue of Salden (361 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir John Fortescue (ca. 1531 or 1533 – 23 December 1607) of Salden Manor, near Mursley, Buckinghamshire, was the seventh Chancellor of the Exchequer of
Richard Sackville (escheator) (533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Richard Sackville (c. 1507 – 21 April 1566) of Ashburnham and Buckhurst in Sussex and Westenhanger in Kent; was an English administrator and Member
George Carey, 2nd Baron Hunsdon (348 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Carey, 2nd Baron Hunsdon KG (1547 – 9 September 1603) was the eldest son of Henry Carey, 1st Baron Hunsdon and Anne Morgan. His father was first
Artists of the Tudor court (3,545 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The artists of the Tudor court are the painters and limners engaged by the monarchs of England's Tudor dynasty and their courtiers between 1485 and 1603
Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk (1,280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, KG (10 March 1536 – 2 June 1572) was an English nobleman and politician. Although hailing from a family with strong
Thomas Cartwright (theologian) (637 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Cartwright (c. 1535 – 27 December 1603) was an English Puritan churchman. Cartwright was probably born in Royston, Hertfordshire, and studied divinity
A Dead Man in Deptford (266 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and character of Christopher Marlowe, a renowned playwright of the Elizabethan era. Reckless but brilliant Cambridge scholar Kit Marlowe is conscripted
Timeline of the English Poor Law system (333 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Timeline of the Poor Law system from its origins in the Tudor and Elizabethan era to its abolition in 1948. 1344- Royal Ordinance stated that lepers
Robert Pierrepont, 1st Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull (492 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Pierrepont, 1st Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull (6 August 1584 – 25 July 1643) was an English nobleman who joined the Royalist side in the English Civil
Richard Burbage (1,504 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Burbage (6 January 1567 – 12 March 1619) was an English stage actor, widely considered to have been one of the most famous actors of the Globe
Henry Brooke, 11th Baron Cobham (796 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Brooke, 11th Baron Cobham (22 November 1564 – 24 January 1618 (Old Style)/3 February 1618 (New Style)) was an English peer who was implicated in
Miles Smith (bishop) (398 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Miles Smith (1554, Hereford – 1624, Gloucester) was by inclination and talent, a scholar, theologian, bibliophile, and by occupation a member of the clergy
Christopher Hatton (1,897 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Christopher Hatton KG (1540 – 20 November 1591) was an English politician, Lord Chancellor of England and a favourite of Elizabeth I of England. He
Robert Sackville, 2nd Earl of Dorset (627 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Sackville, 2nd Earl of Dorset (1561–1609) was an English aristocrat and politician, with humanist and commercial interests. He was the eldest son
William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (771 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke KG, PC (8 April 1580 – 10 April 1630) was an English nobleman, politician, and courtier. He was the son of Henry
Elizabeth Raleigh (1,025 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elizabeth, Lady Raleigh (née Throckmorton; 16 April 1565 – c. 1647) was Sir Walter Raleigh's wife and a Gentlewoman of the Privy Chamber to Queen Elizabeth
William Knollys, 1st Earl of Banbury (695 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Knollys, 1st Earl of Banbury, KG, PC (1544 – 25 May 1632) was an English nobleman at the court of Queen Elizabeth I and King James I. He was the
Thomas Sampson (690 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Sampson (c. 1517–1589) was an English Puritan theologian. A Marian exile, he was one of the Geneva Bible translators. On his return to England,
Henry Carey, 1st Baron Hunsdon (1,650 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Carey, 1st Baron Hunsdon KG (4 March 1526 – 23 July 1596), was an English nobleman and courtier. He was the patron of Lord Chamberlain's Men, William
Charles Blount, 8th Baron Mountjoy (1,067 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Blount, 1st Earl of Devonshire, KG (pronounced Blunt; 1563 – 3 April 1606) was an English nobleman and soldier who served as Lord Deputy of Ireland
William Camden (2,597 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Camden (2 May 1551 – 9 November 1623) was an English antiquarian, historian, topographer, and herald, best known as author of Britannia, the first
Thomas Bodley (1,841 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Thomas Bodley (2 March 1545 – 28 January 1613) was an English diplomat and scholar who founded the Bodleian Library in Oxford. Thomas Bodley was born
Henry FitzAlan, 19th Earl of Arundel (1,333 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry FitzAlan, 19th Earl of Arundel KG (23 April 1512 – 24 February 1580) was an English nobleman, who over his long life assumed a prominent place at
Kat Ashley (1,245 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Katherine Ashley (circa 1502 – 18 July 1565) (or Astley), née Katherine Champernowne, was governess to Queen Elizabeth I of England and became her close
Francis Knollys (admiral) (448 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Francis Knollys (c. 1552 – 1648) of Reading Abbey, Berkshire was an English privateer and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times
William Brydges, 4th Baron Chandos (148 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Brydges, 4th Baron Chandos (ca. 1552 – 1602), was an English peer and politician. He was the younger son and heir of Edmund Brydges, 2nd Baron
Irish Poor Laws (1,041 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
modelled on the English Poor Law of 1834. In England, this replaced Elizabethan era legislation which had no equivalent in Ireland. In 1703, the Irish
Francis, Duke of Anjou (1,905 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Francis, Duke of Anjou and Alençon (Hercule François; 18 March 1555 – 10 June 1584) was the youngest son of King Henry II of France and Catherine de' Medici
William Gilbert (astronomer) (2,946 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Gilbert (/ˈɡɪlbərt/; 24 May 1544 – 30 November 1603), also known as Gilberd, was an English physician, physicist and natural philosopher. He passionately
Edmund Brydges, 2nd Baron Chandos (229 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edmund Brydges, 2nd Baron Chandos (before 1522 – 11 March 1573) was an English peer and politician. He was a Knight of the Garter, Baron Chandos, Lord
Chidiock Tichborne (2,518 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Montfort. The "Elegy" has also been set to music many times from the Elizabethan era to the present day by, among others, Michael East, Richard Alison (fl1580-1610
John Lumley, 1st Baron Lumley (1,093 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Lumley, 1st Baron Lumley (c. 1533 – 1609) was an English aristocrat, who is remembered as one of the greatest collectors of art and books of his age
Walter Mildmay (2,157 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Walter Mildmay (bef. 1523 – 31 May 1589) was an English statesman who served as Chancellor of the Exchequer of England under Queen Elizabeth I, and
Catherine Carey (1,444 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Catherine Carey, after her marriage Catherine Knollys and later known as both Lady Knollys and Lady Catherine Knollys, (c. 1524 – 15 January 1569), was
Christopher Blount (722 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Christopher Blount (1555/1556 – 18 March 1601) was an English soldier, secret agent, and rebel. He served as a leading household officer of Robert
William Averell (691 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Averell (baptised 12 February 1556 – buried 23 September 1605) was an English pamphleteer, prose writer, parish clerk, and schoolmaster. He is
Catherine Howard, Countess of Suffolk (707 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Catherine (or Katherine) Howard, Countess of Suffolk (1564–1638), was an English court office holder. She served as lady-in-waiting to the queen consort
Edward Stafford, 3rd Baron Stafford (444 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Stafford, 3rd Baron Stafford (7 January 1535 – 18 October 1603) was the second surviving son of Henry Stafford, 1st Baron Stafford and Ursula Pole
Robert Carr, 1st Earl of Somerset (1,362 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Carr, 1st Earl of Somerset KG (c. 1587 – 17 July 1645), was a politician, and favourite of King James VI and I. Robert Kerr was born in Wrington
Philip Amadas (215 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Philip Amadas (1550–1618) was a naval commander and explorer in Elizabethan England. Little is known from his early life, but he grew up within a wealthy
Philip Howard, 20th Earl of Arundel (1,250 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Philip Howard, 20th Earl of Arundel (28 June 1557 – 19 October 1595) was an English nobleman. He was canonised by Pope Paul VI in 1970, as one of
Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex (1,346 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex, KG (16 September 1541 – 22 September 1576), was an English nobleman and general. From 1573 until his death he fought
Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset (1,320 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset (1536 – 19 April 1608) was an English statesman, poet, and dramatist. He was the son of Richard Sackville, a cousin
John Stow (2,850 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Stow (also Stowe; 1524/25 – 5 April 1605) was an English historian and antiquarian. He is remembered for his various chronicles of English history
Christopher Johnson (physician) (404 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Christopher Johnson or Jonson (1536?–1597) was an English physician, educator and neo-Latin poet. Born about 1536, at Kedleston in Derbyshire, he became
Thomas Cecil, 1st Earl of Exeter (1,037 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Cecil, 1st Earl of Exeter, KG (5 May 1542 – 8 February 1623), known as Lord Burghley from 1598 to 1605, was an English politician, courtier and
Nicholas Throckmorton (1,783 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Nicholas Throckmorton (or Throgmorton) (c. 1515/1516 – 12 February 1571) was an English diplomat and politician, who was an ambassador to France and
John Bull (composer) (1,747 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Bull (1562 or 1563 – 12 March 1628) was an English composer, musician and organ builder. He was a renowned keyboard performer of the virginalist school
John Mundy (composer) (283 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Mundy (or Munday) (before 1555 – 29 June 1630) was an English composer, virginalist and organist of the Renaissance period. The son and pupil of the
John Oxenham (519 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Oxenham (a.k.a. "John Oxnam", died (1580-09-30)September 30, 1580) was the first non-Spanish European explorer to cross the Isthmus of Panama in 1575
William Ames (1,470 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Ames (/eɪmz/; Latin: Guilielmus Amesius; 1576 – 14 November 1633) was an English Protestant divine, philosopher, and controversialist. He spent
Edward Manners, 3rd Earl of Rutland (850 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Manners, 3rd Earl of Rutland, 14th Baron de Ros of Helmsley, KG (12 July 1549 – 14 April 1587) was the son of Henry Manners, 2nd Earl of Rutland
Thomas Bilson (3,018 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anglicanism portal Thomas Bilson (1547 – 18 June 1616) was an Anglican Bishop of Worcester and Bishop of Winchester. With Miles Smith, he oversaw the final
Michael Blount (217 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Michael Blount (c. 1530–1610) was a Tudor and Jacobean royal official and politician. He was born in Mapledurham House, Oxfordshire to Sir Richard
Jane Lumley, Baroness Lumley (340 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jane Lumley, Baroness Lumley (née Lady Jane Fitzalan; 1537 – 27 July 1578) was an English noble who was the first person to translate Euripides into English
Henry Sidney (1,896 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Henry Sidney (1529 – 5 May 1586), Lord Deputy of Ireland, was the eldest son of Sir William Sidney of Penshurst, a prominent politician and courtier
John Lyly (2,260 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Lyly (Lilly or Lylie; /ˈlɪli/; c. 1553 or 1554 – November 1606) was an English writer, poet, dramatist, and courtier, best known during his lifetime
Catherine Carey, Countess of Nottingham (602 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Catherine Howard, Countess of Nottingham (née Catherine Carey; c. 1547 – 25 February 1603), was a cousin, lady-in-waiting, and close confidante of Elizabeth
John Cooper (composer) (400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Coprario (c. 1570 – 1626), also known as Giovanni Coprario or Coperario, was an English composer and viol player. According to later commentators
Blanche Parry (1,596 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Blanche Parry (1507/8–12 February 1590) of Newcourt in the parish of Bacton, Herefordshire, in the Welsh Marches, was a personal attendant of Queen Elizabeth
John Farmer (composer) (268 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Farmer (c. 1570 – c. 1601) was a composer of the English Madrigal School. He was born in England around 1570 but his exact date of birth is not known
Humphrey Gilbert (3,730 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Humphrey Gilbert (c. 1539 – 9 September 1583) of Compton in the parish of Marldon and of Greenway in the parish of Churston Ferrers, both in Devon
Henry Howard, 1st Earl of Northampton (2,189 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Howard, 1st Earl of Northampton (25 February 1540 – 15 June 1614) was an important English aristocrat and courtier. He was suspect as a crypto-Catholic
Elizabeth Knollys (916 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elizabeth Knollys, Lady Leighton (15 June 1549 – c.1605), was an English courtier who served Queen Elizabeth I of England, first as a Maid of Honour and
Giles Brydges, 3rd Baron Chandos (393 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Giles Brydges, 3rd Baron Chandos of Sudeley (c. 1548 – 21 February 1594) was an English courtier in the reign of Elizabeth I. He was born at Sudeley Manor
Edward Kelley (2,716 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Edward Kelley or Kelly, also known as Edward Talbot (UK: /ˈtɔːlbət/; 1 August 1555 – 1597/8, was an English Renaissance occultist and self-declared
Mark Ridley (physician) (619 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Dr Mark Ridley (1560 – c. 1624) was an English physician and lexicographer, born in Stretham, Cambridgeshire, to Lancelot Ridley. He became physician to
William Brooke, 10th Baron Cobham (1,294 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
See Baron Cobham for other simultaneous creations of the title. Sir William Brooke, 10th Baron Cobham, KG (1 November 1527 – 6 March 1597) was Lord Warden
Sir Robert Cotton, 1st Baronet, of Connington (2,702 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Robert Bruce Cotton, 1st Baronet (22 January 1570/1 – 6 May 1631) of Conington Hall in the parish of Conington in Huntingdonshire, England, was a Member
Edward Stafford, 4th Baron Stafford (265 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Stafford, 4th Baron Stafford (1572 – 16 September 1625) was the son of Edward Stafford, 3rd Baron Stafford and Mary Stanley, daughter of Edward
Henry Stafford, 2nd Baron Stafford (333 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Stafford, 2nd Baron Stafford (before 1527 – 1 Jan 1565) was a British peer in the peerage of England and MP. Henry Stafford was the eldest surviving
Elizabeth Trentham, Countess of Oxford (917 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elizabeth de Vere, Countess of Oxford, formerly Elizabeth Trentham (d. c. December 1612), was the second wife of the Elizabethan courtier and poet Edward
Owen Hopton (180 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Owen Hopton (c. 1519 – 1595) was an English administrator and politician. He was born the son of Sir Arthur Hopton of Cockfield Hall, Yoxford and knighted
Thomas Hood (mathematician) (498 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Hood (1556–1620) was an English mathematician and physician, the first lecturer in mathematics appointed in England, a few years before the founding
John Farmery (physician) (385 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Farmery, M.D. (died 1590) was an English physician. Farmery was a native of Lincolnshire, and matriculated as a pensioner of King's College, Cambridge
Katherine Brandon, Duchess of Suffolk (2,475 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Katherine Brandon, Duchess of Suffolk, suo jure 12th Baroness Willoughby de Eresby (22 March 1519 – 19 September 1580), was an English noblewoman living
Carew Raleigh (324 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This article concerns Sir Walter Raleigh's brother. For his namesake and nephew, Sir Walter's son, see Carew Raleigh (1605–1666) Sir Carew Raleigh or Ralegh
Richard Blount (615 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Blount, S.J. (1565–1638) was an English priest and the first Jesuit Provincial of England after the Elizabethan Laws were passed. Richard was born
William Blount, 7th Baron Mountjoy (80 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Blount, 7th Baron Mountjoy, (c. 1561 – 1594) was an English peer. William Blount was born circa 1561, the eldest son of James Blount, 6th Baron
Robert Johnson (English composer) (1,109 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
html http://www.contemplator.com/england/walkfrth.html http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/robert-johnson.htm Free musical animation on the First Witches
Lord John Grey (Tudor nobleman) (1,012 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Lord John Grey (1523/24 – 19 November 1564) was an English nobleman and courtier of the Tudor period, who after 1559 was seated at Pirgo Place in Essex
Thomas Trentham (216 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Trentham (1538–1587) was an English politician. He was the son of his father of Rocester Abbey, who died in 1539. In 1571, he became a Knight of
Thomas Overbury (2,123 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Thomas Overbury (baptized 1581 – 14 September 1613) was an English poet and essayist, also known for being the victim of a murder which led to a scandalous
Peregrine Bertie, 13th Baron Willoughby de Eresby (725 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Peregrine Bertie, 13th Baron Willoughby de Eresby (12 October 1555 – 25 June 1601) was the son of Catherine Willoughby, 12th Baroness Willoughby de Eresby
Henry Knollys (privateer) (557 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Henry Knollys of Kingsbury, Warwickshire (ca. 1542 – 21 December 1582) was an English courtier, privateer and Member of Parliament. He was born the
Thomas Newton (poet) (874 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Newton (c. 1542–1607) was an English clergyman, poet, author and translator. The eldest son of Edward Newton of Park House, in Butley, a part of
Thomas Newton (poet) (874 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Newton (c. 1542–1607) was an English clergyman, poet, author and translator. The eldest son of Edward Newton of Park House, in Butley, a part of
Elizabeth II (10,913 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of the United Kingdom and the other Commonwealth realms. Elizabeth was born
Henry Knollys (privateer) (557 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Henry Knollys of Kingsbury, Warwickshire (ca. 1542 – 21 December 1582) was an English courtier, privateer and Member of Parliament. He was born the
Douglas Sheffield, Baroness Sheffield (1,533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Douglas Sheffield (also spelt Douglass), Baroness Sheffield, maiden name Douglas Howard (1542/1543 – 1608), was an English noblewoman and the mother of
Robert Parsons (composer) (1,169 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robert Parsons (ca. 1535 – January 1571/2) was an English composer of the Tudor period who was active during the reigns of King Edward VI, Queen Mary I
Richard Hooker (2,842 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Hooker (25 March, 1554 – 3 November 1600) was an English priest in the Church of England and an influential theologian. He was one of the most
Jerome Bowes (867 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Jerome Bowes (died 1616) was an English ambassador to Russia and Member of Parliament in England. He was born into a Durham family, the son of John
Roger Manners, 5th Earl of Rutland (1,108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Roger Manners, 5th Earl of Rutland (6 October 1576 – 26 June 1612) was the eldest surviving son of John Manners, 4th Earl of Rutland and his wife, Elizabeth
Charles Blount (soldier) (182 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Charles Blount (1568–1600) was an English soldier during the Tudor period. Sir Charles was the son of Sir Michael Blount of Mapledurham House in Oxfordshire
Anne Knollys, Baroness De La Warr (810 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anne West, Lady De La Warr (née Knollys) (19 July 1555 – 30 August 1608) was a lady at the court of Queen Elizabeth I of England. Anne Knollys was the
George Turner (physician) (544 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
George Turner (died 1610) was an English physician in London. He is known for his interest in alchemy and friendship with Simon Forman. His wife was the
15 minutes of fame (1,322 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
expression "nine days' wonder", which dates at least as far back as the Elizabethan era. German art historian Benjamin H. D. Buchloh suggests that the core
Thomas Robinson (composer) (1,141 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Robinson (c. 1560 – 1610 (Christian calendar)) was an English renaissance composer and music teacher, who flourished around 1600. He taught and
Edward Dodding (858 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Dodding (c. 1540 – April 1592) was an English physician who completed the post-mortem examination of Kalicho, one of three Inuit who died soon after
Thomas Francis (English physician) (405 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Francis (died 1574) was an English academic and physician, Provost of The Queen's College, Oxford and President of the London College of Physicians
Henry Knollys (died 1583) (58 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Henry Knollys (died 1583) was an English politician and diplomat. He was a Member (MP) of the Parliament of England for Grampound in 1547, New Shoreham
John Bettes the Younger (216 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Bettes the Younger (died 1616) was an English portrait painter. His father, the painter John Bettes the Elder died in, or before 1570. Like Isaac
Arthur Barlowe (479 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arthur Barlowe (1550 – 1620) was one of two British captains (the other was Philip Amadas) who, under the direction of Sir Walter Raleigh, left England
Roger Stafford, 6th Baron Stafford (485 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Roger Stafford, 6th Baron Stafford was the son of Richard Stafford, a younger son of Henry Stafford, 1st Baron Stafford and Ursula Pole. He was forced
Cuthbert Burbage (2,482 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cuthbert Burbage (c. 15 June 1565 – 15 September 1636) was an English theatrical figure, son of James Burbage, builder of the Theatre in Shoreditch and
Francis Knollys (the elder) (3,180 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Francis Knollys, KG of Rotherfield Greys, Oxfordshire (c. 1511 / c. 1514 – 19 July 1596) was an English courtier in the service of Henry VIII, Edward
Peter Carew (died 1580) (1,025 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Sir Peter Carew (died 25 August 1580) was an English soldier who was slain at the Battle of Glenmalure in Ireland. He was a member of a prominent Devonshire
John Pleydell (died 1608) (89 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
John Pleydell (c. 1535 – 1608) was the member of Parliament for Cricklade in the parliament of 1593. Pleydell was a younger son of a wealthy tenant farmer
Thomas Cogan (Tudor physician) (285 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Cogan (1545?–1607) was an English physician. Cogan was born about 1546 at Chard, Somersetshire. He was educated at Oxford, graduated B.A. 1562-3
Poor relief (2,838 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In English and British history, poor relief refers to government and ecclesiastical action to relieve poverty. Over the centuries various authorities have
Thomas Allen (mathematician) (1,636 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Thomas Allen (or Alleyn) (21 December 1542 – 30 September 1632) was an English mathematician and astrologer. Highly reputed in his lifetime, he published
Woodsome Hall (336 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Woodsome Hall Golf Club and a Grade I listed building. Built in the Elizabethan era as a hall house, Woodsome evolved in stages in the possession of several
Richard Grenville (3,217 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Richard Grenville (15 June 1542 – 10 September 1591), also spelt Greynvile, Greeneville, and Greenfield, was an English sailor who, as captain of Revenge
William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley (5,175 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, KG, PC (13 September 1520 – 4 August 1598) was an English statesman, the chief advisor of Queen Elizabeth I for most
William Danby (coroner) (1,013 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Breight, Curtis C. (1996). Surveillance, Militarism and Drama in the Elizabethan Era. Hammer, Paul E.J. (1996). "A Reckoning Reframed: the "Murder" of Christopher
Thomas Harriot (3,385 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Harriot /ˈhæriət/ (Oxford, c. 1560 – London, 2 July 1621), also spelled Harriott, Hariot or Heriot, was an English astronomer, mathematician, ethnographer
Mary, Queen of Scots (10,589 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mary, Queen of Scots (8 December 1542 – 8 February 1587), also known as Mary Stuart or Mary I of Scotland, reigned over Scotland from 14 December 1542
The Blind Beggar of Alexandria (840 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Blind Beggar of Alexandria is an Elizabethan era stage play, a comedy written by George Chapman. It was the first of Chapman's plays to be produced
Roderigo Lopez (2,397 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Roderigo Lopez (also called Ruy Lopes, Ruy Lopez or Roger Lopez; c. 1517 – 7 June 1594) served as physician-in-chief to Queen Elizabeth I of England from
William Clowes (surgeon) (1,162 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William Clowes the elder (c.1543 or 1544–1604) was an early English surgeon. He published case reports in which he advocated the application of powders
Lord President of Munster (1,103 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
government of the Irish province of Munster from its introduction in the Elizabethan era for a century, to 1672, a period including the Desmond Rebellions in
A Looking Glass for London (1,051 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A Looking Glass for London and England is an Elizabethan era stage play, a collaboration between Thomas Lodge and Robert Greene. Recounting the Biblical
A Looking Glass for London (1,051 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
A Looking Glass for London and England is an Elizabethan era stage play, a collaboration between Thomas Lodge and Robert Greene. Recounting the Biblical
John Downame (931 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Downame (Downham) (1571–1652) was an English clergyman and theologian in London, who came to prominence in the 1640s, when he worked closely with
Mount Grenville (134 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
large group of summits in this region to be named for figures of the Elizabethan era, or with other Elizabethan associations (e.g. the icefield includes
Lettice Knollys (3,935 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lettice Knollys (/ˈnoʊlz/ NOHLZ, sometimes latinized as Laetitia, alias Lettice Devereux or Lettice Dudley), Countess of Essex and Countess of Leicester
Shakespeare on the Saskatchewan (675 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Night Henry Woolf Elizabethan Era 1996 King Lear Stephen Heatley Modern day business world 1997 The Tempest Henry Woolf Elizabethan Era 1997 Julius Caesar
Richard Allison (composer) (358 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Richard Al(l)ison (born c. 1560–1570 – died before 1610) was an English composer. He wrote de la Tromba, a fine broken consort piece which has several
Ambrose Dudley, 3rd Earl of Warwick (3,286 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ambrose Dudley, 3rd Earl of Warwick, KG (c. 1530 – 21 February 1590) was an English nobleman and general, and an elder brother of Queen Elizabeth I's favourite
John Hawkins (naval commander) (3,467 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Admiral Sir John Hawkins (also spelled as Hawkyns) (1532 – 12 November 1595) was an English slave trader, naval commander and administrator, merchant,
Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex (3,923 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, KG, PC (/ˈdɛvəˌruː/; 10 November 1565 – 25 February 1601), was an English nobleman and a favourite of Elizabeth I.
Audrey Walsingham (630 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lady Audrey Walsingham (née Shelton; 1568–1624) was an English courtier. She served as Lady of the Bedchamber to queen Elizabeth I of England, and then
Campaspe (play) (794 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Campaspe is an Elizabethan era stage play, a comedy by John Lyly. Widely considered Lyly's earliest drama, Campaspe was an influence and a precedent for
William White (composer) (218 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
William White (1571 – ca. 1634?) was a composer of classical music of the Tudor period, who worked in England. According to Ernst Hermann Meyer, "White
Mildred Cooke (1,918 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mildred Cooke, Lady Burghley (1526 – 4 April 1589) was an English noblewoman and translator in the sixteenth century. She was the wife of William Cecil
An Humorous Day's Mirth (690 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
An Humorous Day's Mirth is an Elizabethan era stage play, a comedy by George Chapman, first acted in 1597 and published in 1599. Algernon Charles Swinburne
Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury (4,109 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury, KG, PC (1 June 1563 – 24 May 1612) was an English statesman noted for his direction of the government during the Union
Anthony Bacon (68 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1558–1601), member of the English Bacon family and spy during the Elizabethan era Anthony Bacon (industrialist) (1717–1786), English-born industrialist
The Wounds of Civil War (390 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Wounds of Civil War is an Elizabethan era stage play, written by Thomas Lodge. A dramatization of the ancient Roman conflict between Marius and Sulla
Elizabeth Howard (d. 1658) (1,174 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Elizabeth Howard (1586 – 17 April 1658), courtier to Anne of Denmark. Elizabeth Howard was a daughter of Thomas Howard, 1st Earl of Suffolk and Katherine
Richard Buller (301 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
wife Thomasina Williams, daughter of Thomas Williams of Stowford, an Elizabethan-era Speaker of the House of Commons. He was knighted in 1608. Buller was
Turnmill Street (650 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
known as Turnmill and Turnbull Street over its history. During the Elizabethan era, under the name Turnbull Street it became "the most disreputable street
Robert Smythson (369 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
architect. Smythson designed a number of notable houses during the Elizabethan era. Little is known about his birth and upbringing—his first mention in
The Woman in the Moon (1,069 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Woman in the Moon is an Elizabethan era stage play, a comedy written by John Lyly. Its unique status in that playwright's dramatic canon – it is the
Sea Dogs (disambiguation) (56 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The Sea Dogs were English adventurers of the Elizabethan era. Sea Dogs may also refer to: Sea Dogs (video game) Sea Dogs (film) Portland Sea Dogs, a baseball
Francis Bacon (8,659 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Alban, PC QC (/ˈbeɪkən/; 22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626) was an English philosopher and statesman who served as Attorney
Englishmen for My Money (551 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Englishmen for My Money, or A Woman Will Have Her Will is an Elizabethan era stage play, a comedy written by William Haughton that dates from the year
Reasonable Blackman (338 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Reasonable Blackman (fl. 1579 - 1592) (also possibly known as John Reason and Reasonable Blackmore) was a silk weaver resident in Southwark, London, in
Love's Metamorphosis (645 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Love's Metamorphosis is an Elizabethan era stage play, an allegorical pastoral written by John Lyly. It was the last of his dramas to be printed. Love's
Woman in the Moon (disambiguation) (76 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
song from the album and film A Star is Born The Woman in the Moon, an Elizabethan era stage play Woman in the Moon, a science fiction silent film Woman in
John of Bordeaux (820 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
John of Bordeaux, or The Second Part of Friar Bacon, is an Elizabethan era stage play, the anonymous sequel to Robert Greene's Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay
Midas (Lyly play) (869 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Midas is an Elizabethan era stage play, a comedy written by John Lyly. It is arguably the most overtly and extensively allegorical of Lyly's allegorical
Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay (1,533 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
entitled The Honorable Historie of Frier Bacon and Frier Bongay, is an Elizabethan era stage play, a comedy written by Robert Greene. Widely regarded as Greene's
Sapho and Phao (1,029 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sapho and Phao is an Elizabethan era stage play, a comedy written by John Lyly. One of Lyly's earliest dramas, it was likely the first that the playwright
Bulbeck (60 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Oxford, Lord Bulbeck (1550–1604), English peer and courtier of the Elizabethan era John Bulbeck (born 1818), English cricketer Matthew Bulbeck (born 1979)
England's Looking Glass (254 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Greene, A Looking Glass for London and England (c.1590), an Elizabethan era stage play Edmund Calamy the Elder, England's Looking Glass (1642)
The Downfall and The Death of Robert Earl of Huntington (1,452 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and The Death of Robert Earl of Huntington are two closely related Elizabethan-era stage plays on the Robin Hood legend, that were written by Anthony
Bulkeley (surname) (260 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Richard Bulkeley (died 1621) (fl.1563-1621), Welsh politician in the Elizabethan era Richard Bulkeley (governor) (1717-1800), Irish-born colonial governor
Buttonhole stitch (473 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
16th- and 17th-century whitework items (samplers, ruffs, and cuffs), Elizabethan-era clothing, and the colorful traditional band samplers. The buttonhole
Gabriel Pleydell (4,314 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gabriel Pleydell (fl. 1519 – c.1591) of Midg Hall in the parish of Lydiard St John (later Lydiard Tregoze) in Wiltshire, was an English landowner and politician
Sonnet 130 (1,764 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
that was a convention of literature and art in general during the Elizabethan era. Influences originating with the poetry of ancient Greece and Rome
Edward Loftus (259 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Loftus (1563-1601) was an Irish barrister, judge and soldier of the Elizabethan era. He was born in Dublin, the second son of Adam Loftus, Archbishop of
William Perkins (theologian) (2,793 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
leaders of the Puritan movement in the Church of England during the Elizabethan era. Although not entirely accepting of the Church of England's ecclesiastical
Mother Bombie (1,319 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mother Bombie is an Elizabethan era stage play, a comedy by John Lyly. It is unique in Lyly's dramatic canon as a work of farce and social realism; in
History of the Puritans under Queen Elizabeth I (5,555 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bible and Reformed theology. This Puritan vision that began in the Elizabethan era would eventually result in the Westminster Assembly, and the Westminster
Sperber (surname) (244 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
sperwære and was a name for a small but belligerent person. In the Elizabethan era, it was not uncommon to refer to someone as "sparrow" as a term of
All Hail to the Days (Drive the Cold Winter Away) (634 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
bride…Twelve days in the year, much mirth and good cheer." During the Elizabethan era (from which the song originates), the majority of Christmas celebrations
Still room (466 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
room. Alchin, L.K. (20 March 2012). "Elizabethan Food Preservation". Elizabethan Era. Archived from the original on 13 March 2014. Retrieved 13 March 2014
Act Break (326 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
greatest playwright ever as his partner. Maury finds himself dressed in Elizabethan-era clothing, and realizes he has gone back in time. Maury sees a man speaking
Peter Quince (380 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
usually taken to be a parody of the popular mystery plays of the pre-Elizabethan era, which were also produced by craftspeople. His metrical preferences
Robert Browne (203 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Browne (Elizabethan actor) (died 1603), English actor of the Elizabethan era; owner and manager of the Boar's Head Theatre Robert Browne (Jacobean
Honiton (1,130 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
known for lace making that was introduced by Flemish immigrants in the Elizabethan era. In the 17th century thousands of people produced lace by hand in their
Catherine Horwood (665 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Rose - (Reikton, 2018) Women and Their Gardens: A History from the Elizabethan Era to Today - (Chicago Review Press, 2012) Gardening Women: Their Stories
Tottel's Miscellany (1,233 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
during the Elizabethan era it is considered the most influential of all Elizabethan miscellanies. It is generally included with Elizabethan era literature
Endymion (play) (2,142 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Endymion, the Man in the Moon is an Elizabethan era comedy by John Lyly, written circa 1588. The action of the play centers around a young courtier, Endymion
Anichkov Palace (574 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
palace came to be known as the most imposing private residence of the Elizabethan era. Some suggest architects Bartolomeo Rastrelli and Mikhail Zemtsov were
Lauren Royal (426 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
young-adult versions of her books with her daughter, Devon, as well as new YA books set in the Renaissance (Elizabethan) era (16th century). Official Website
Burghfield (7,485 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Burghfield /ˈbɜːr.fiːld/ is a village and large civil parish in West Berkshire, England, with a boundary with Reading. Burghfield can trace its history
Stereotypes of Jews in literature (3,476 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Stereotypes of Jews in literature have evolved over the centuries. According to Louis Harap, nearly all European writers prior to the twentieth century
Anne Bacon (1,155 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
philosophers/Anne-Cooke-Bacon/ “Sir Francis Bacon” Elizabethan Era.org, http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/sir-francis-bacon.htm “Anne & Sir Nicholas Bacon”
Gallathea (2,518 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gallathea or Galatea is an Elizabethan era stage play, a comedy by John Lyly. The first record of the play's performance was at Greenwich Palace on New
William Ponsonby (100 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
William Ponsonby (publisher) (died 1604), English publisher in the Elizabethan era William Ponsonby, 2nd Earl of Bessborough (1704–1793), British & Irish
1576 in literature (463 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Croatian Benedictine poet and author (born 1482) "James Burbage". Elizabethan Era. Retrieved 28 January 2014. Flood, W. H. Grattan (1924-11-01). "New
Gresham Hotel (480 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
institution Sir Thomas Gresham a famous merchant-politician in the Elizabethan era. Gresham came to Ireland, and as a young man obtained employment in
Plas Mawr (3,713 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
considers the house to be "the finest surviving town house of the Elizabethan era". Plas Mawr shows a blend of continental Renaissance and local North
British literature (15,193 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
comedies and the late romances, or tragicomedies. Works written in the Elizabethan era include the comedy Twelfth Night, tragedy Hamlet, and history Henry
The Science of Discworld II: The Globe (533 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
universe, inadvertently created during the first book) during the Elizabethan era. This is the first time they learn there are humans on Roundworld;
Wharfinger (418 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
usually called a "harbourmaster". The word's etymology is probably Elizabethan-era English, and possibly a corruption of wharfager. An 1844 usage appears
Farringdon, Hampshire (553 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
all came from the village. Their roots in the Alton area predate the Elizabethan era. Farringdon's closest railway station is at Alton, 2.8 miles (4.5 km)
Piers Plowman tradition (3,597 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
things. What is notable about the Piers/plowman literature of the Elizabethan era is the general absence of the old religious radical who speaks the
Mark Girouard (574 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
House, Somerset (1964) Robert Smythson and the Architecture of the Elizabethan Era (1966) Victorian Pubs (1975) Hardwick Hall (1976) Sweetness and Light:
Bombie (48 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Zombie, a fictional character in the Scrooge McDuck universe Mother Bombie, the main character in the Elizabethan era stage play of the same name Bomby
Neckline (1,119 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
accentuated by pattern(s) in the fabric itself. Ruffs were popular in the Elizabethan era. The off-the-shoulder trend dates back to the Regency and Victorian
The Miller's Daughter (66 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Upon a Time), an episode of the television series Once Upon a Time Fair Em or Fair Em, the Miller's Daughter of Manchester, Elizabethan era stage play
1534 (1,165 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
mystic (d. 1572) Henry Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, statesman of the Elizabethan era (d. 1601) Paul Skalić, Croatian encyclopedist, humanist and adventurer
Cape Cross (571 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 30 May 2010. Encyclopædia Britannica: Diogo Cão. Alchin KL, from Elizabethan Era. "Bartholomeu Dias". Retrieved 02-03-2010. Check date values in: |accessdate=
History of the Puritans under King James I (5,244 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bible and Reformed theology. This Puritan vision that began in the Elizabethan era would eventually result in the Westminster Assembly, and the Westminster
Blackmore (649 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
where Sir Walter Mildmay, Chancellor of the Exchequer during the Elizabethan era lived. Fingrith was recorded in the Domesday Book as 'Phingaria' which
Bartolomeu Dias (1,260 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
infoplease. Sandbox Networks, Inc. Retrieved 29 May 2015. Alchin KL, from Elizabethan Era. "Bartholomeu Dias". Retrieved 28 March 2014. Spoken, Howard (2006)
Waṣf (439 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
favorite of the troubadour poets and the authors of sonnets in the Elizabethan era. This renaissance literature was popularized by French authors via
Waṣf (439 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
favorite of the troubadour poets and the authors of sonnets in the Elizabethan era. This renaissance literature was popularized by French authors via
Sonnet 127 (1,403 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The past in which "black was not counted fair" refers to traditional Elizabethan era priority of light skin, hair, and eyes over dark. Many suggest Shakespeare
Elizabethan Express (562 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elizabethan was a daily non-stop service in celebration of the new 'Elizabethan' era of the early 1950s. Departure from both ends was in mid-morning, for
Vespasian's Camp (1,273 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The name was given to the site by William Camden, who during the Elizabethan era toured the area and gave the hill its romanticised name. The hill fort
Susan Skilliter (175 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Harborne and trade relations between England and the Ottomans in the Elizabethan era, and became a noted authority on the subject. She died on 16 September
Bishop River (265 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
proposed by him. He died in Victoria on February 13, 1954. Of the many Elizabethan-era names in the Coast Mountains, many are in the area of the Bishop River
Jacobean architecture (1,271 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
central chimney, a feature of British architecture since the earlier Elizabethan era, a timber frame, a squat lower floor and an upper floor with bare beams
Throckmorton Plot (793 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
January 1584; he was the last Spanish ambassador to England during the Elizabethan era. After being tortured to ensure he had revealed as much information
Alford, Lincolnshire (1,531 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and a 17th-century tomb in the chancel. It founded a school in the Elizabethan era. The church holds a variety of worship services, and annual community
Euphrasia (704 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the brain. It was also used to treat bad memory and vertigo. In the Elizabethan era the plant was used in ales and Gervase Markham's Countrie Farm (1616)
Fressingfield (782 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in his play Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay. A Guildhall was built the Elizabethan era. (Still standing, it serves as a restaurant.) The peak population of
Rhyme royal (1,258 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pleasure. The seven-line stanza began to go out of fashion during the Elizabethan era but it was still used by John Davies in Orchestra and by William Shakespeare
Bear-baiting (2,412 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and Begging, London, 1887, p.111 "Elizabethan Bear & Bull Baiting". Elizabethan-era.org.uk. 17 May 2007. Archived from the original on 27 October 2010
Cue for Treason (1,401 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bannerdale stories, including No Boats on Bannermere. The politics of the Elizabethan era are mentioned in the novel: social concerns over enclosures and unemployment
Theater (structure) (3,236 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
reconstructed, can be seen to be a marvel of Roman architecture. During the Elizabethan era in England, theaters were constructed of wooden framing, infilled with
Pinta (ship) (919 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
University Press. pp. 143–145. ISBN 978-0-521-44652-5. http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/christopher-columbus-ships.htm Phillips, William D.; Phillips
White Sea (2,112 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
arrived in Kholmogory in 1553. Henryk Zins England and the Baltic in the Elizabethan era, Manchester University Press, 1972 ISBN 0-87471-117-7 pp. 35,38 Isabel
Raid (military) (1,787 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Raiding formed a major component of English naval strategy in the Elizabethan era, with attacks on the Spanish possessions in the New World. A major
Baron Folliott (172 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
retained when modern capital F was introduced in italic print in the Elizabethan era. L. Munby, S. Hobbs, A. Crosby, "Reading Tudor and Stuart Handwriting"
Gardening Women (234 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
published under the title Women and Their Gardens: A History from the Elizabethan Era to Today by the Chicago Review Press in 2012. The book received largely
Curtain Theatre (1,744 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Shakespeare Online. Retrieved 7 May 2016. "Curtain Elizabethan Theatre". Elizabethan Era Online. Retrieved 7 May 2016. "The Curtain Theatre". London Borough
Cotswolds (4,823 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
important market for Cotswold wool and yarn. Chavenage House is an Elizabethan-era manor house 1.5 miles (2.4 km) northwest of Tetbury. Of some interest
Shylock (3,189 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
particularly onerous or unpleasant obligation. English society in the Elizabethan era has been described as antisemitic. English Jews had been expelled in
Richard Hawkins (875 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the South Sea (1622), which became the most famous adventure of the Elizabethan era,[citation needed] re-published by the Hakluyt Society in 1847, and
Swan (3,889 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help) "Baked Swan. Old Elizabethan Recipe". elizabethan-era.org.uk. Archived from the original on 2010-10-27. Cite uses deprecated
Greenwich armour (2,709 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Worcester is also similarly styled. Another defining characteristic of Elizabethan-era Greenwich armour is the extravagant use of colour in general to decorate
One-man band (1,920 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
still be heard in parts of rural France, in England and Spain. An Elizabethan-era woodcut shows a clown playing the pipe and tabor. An 1820s watercolour
Pánfilo de Narváez (2,053 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
and captain of the province. Alchin, Linda K., "Panfilo de Narvaez", Elizabethan Era, retrieved June 17, 2010 "The Misadventures of Pánfilo de Narváez and
Ponsonby (914 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
William Ponsonby (publisher) (died 1604), London publisher of the Elizabethan era William Ponsonby, 1st Baron Ponsonby of Imokilly (1744–1806), leading
Fettiplace (1,211 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
editor, Hilary Spurling. The compilation gives an intimate view of Elizabethan era cookery and domestic life in an aristocratic country household. The
Greyabbey (2,021 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
monastery was physically destroyed during the military operations of the Elizabethan era. In 1572, Brian O'Neill burnt Grey Abbey in order to stop it being
Jacques Cartier (4,249 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
America. 1. p. 46. "Jacques Cartier, Short Biography (w/timeline)". Elizabethan Era. 2010. Retrieved October 2, 2010. "Cartier's Third Voyage to Canada
Wilfred Joseph Cripps (486 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
trade in the Cotswolds and were prominent in Cirencester from the Elizabethan era. His grandfather Joseph Cripps and his father William Cripps were both
Christ's College, Cambridge (2,348 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Philologist William Perkins 1558 1602 Leading Puritan Theologian of the Elizabethan Era Sir John Plumb 1911 2001 British historian Thomas Plume 1630 1704 English
Bard on the Beach (4,082 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
production, a hilarious runaway hit; it plays in repertory with the Elizabethan-era romantic comedy, Shakespeare in Love. On the Howard Family Stage there
George Brookshaw (181 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
2014. Horwood, Catherine. Women and Their Gardens: A History from the Elizabethan Era to Today. Chicago Review Press, 2012: 181. ISBN 9781613743409 Brookshaw's
Mathew Roydon (736 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Night, the vampire Matthew Clairmont is revealed to have been, in the Elizabethan era, a fictionalised version of Matthew Roydon of the School of Night.
George Carteret (1,551 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
December 2011. "Elizabethtown, as it was originally called, missed the Elizabethan era by just 60 years and, in any event, the Elizabeth for whom it was named
Counties of Ireland (6,145 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
North East Liberties of Coleraine (in County Antrim). Throughout the Elizabethan era and the reign of her successor James I, the exact boundaries of the
Butler (4,984 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
were only minimally involved with various stores. The Steward of the Elizabethan era was more akin to the butler that later emerged. Gradually, throughout
Nancy Kerr (1,608 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The English Folk Dance and Song Society creating new music about the Elizabethan era. In November 2015, Kerr was one of four songwriters commissioned by
Leonard Dacre (864 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
2018. Breight, Curtis C., Surveillance, Militarism and Drama in the Elizabethan Era, Springer, 1996, ISBN 9780230373020, p.202 http://www.oxforddnb.com
George Barne III (624 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Oct 2009. "England and the Baltic", England and the Baltic in the Elizabethan Era, p. 96, Retrieved 2 Oct 2009. "Virginia Historical Magazine", Virginia
Clerkenwell (3,736 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ordinaries, dicing houses, bowling alleys, and brothel houses". During the Elizabethan era Clerkenwell contained a notorious brothel quarter. In Shakespeare's
Lady-in-waiting (7,549 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Robert (1924), Twelve Years at the Imperial German Court[full citation needed] Alchin, Linda. "Lady in Waiting". Elizabethan Era. Retrieved 18 April 2017.
The White House, Aston Munslow (504 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
originally the cross-wing of a still older building, demolished during the Elizabethan-era alterations. It is possible that the cellars beneath the central portion