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Longer titles found: Witch trials in the early modern period (view), Resistance theory in the Early Modern period (view), Germany in the early modern period (view), Scotland in the early modern period (view), Economy of Scotland in the early modern period (view), History of early modern period domes (view)

searching for Early modern period 338 found (3331 total)

alternate case: early modern period

17th century (4,126 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article

lasted from January 1, 1601, to December 31, 1700. It falls into the Early Modern period of Europe and in that continent (whose impact on the world was increasing)
Lutheran orthodoxy (993 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lutheran orthodoxy was an era in the history of Lutheranism, which began in 1580 from the writing of the Book of Concord and ended at the Age of Enlightenment
Peasant (2,942 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A peasant is a pre-industrial agricultural laborer or farmer with limited land ownership, especially one living in the Middle Ages under feudalism and
Městys (639 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Městys (or, unofficially or obsolete, městečko) is a status conferred on certain municipalities in the Czech Republic, lying in terms of size and importance
Livre tournois (768 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
unit used in accounting) used in France in the Middle Ages and the early modern period. The denier tournois coin was initially minted by the abbey of Saint
Rûm (1,145 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rûm (Arabic pronunciation: [ˈruːmˤ]; singular Rûmi), also transliterated as Roum (in Arabic الرُّومُ ar-Rūm; in Persian and Ottoman Turkish روم Rûm; in
L-plan castle (457 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
An L-plan castle is a castle or tower house in the shape of an L, typically built in the 13th to the 17th century. This design is found quite frequently
Tōhoku region (1,301 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tōhoku region (東北地方, Tōhoku-chihō), Northeast region, or Northeast Japan (東北日本, Tōhoku-nihon) consists of the northeastern portion of Honshu, the largest
French livre (1,181 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The livre (French for "pound") was the currency of Kingdom of France and its predecessor state of West Francia from 781 to 1794. Several different livres
Composite monarchy (2,615 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
down to 1841. In France, a far more unified state than Spain in the early modern period, the state was divided into different customary tax regimes, the
Evening gown (946 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
An evening gown, evening dress or gown is a long flowing[further explanation needed] dress usually worn to formal occasions. The drop ranges from ballerina
Adamic language (1,610 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
various ways by the late medieval Italian poet Dante Alighieri. In the early modern period, some authors continued to discuss the possibility of an Adamic language
Exploration of the Americas (18 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The exploration of the Americas includes: Exploration of North America Colonization of the Americas Voyages of Christopher Columbus
Rocaille (1,445 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rocaille (US: /roʊˈkaɪ, rɒˈkaɪ/ ro(h)-KY, French: [ʁɔkɑj]) was a French style of exuberant decoration, with an abundance of curves, counter-curves, undulations
Timelines of modern history (279 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The following are timelines of modern history, from c. 1500, the end of the Middle Ages to the present. For a timeline of events from 1501 to 1600, see
Christian art (1,218 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christian art is sacred art which uses themes and imagery from Christianity. Most Christian groups use or have used art to some extent, although some have
Suruga Province (787 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Suruga Province (駿河国, Suruga no kuni) was an old province in the area that is today the central part of Shizuoka Prefecture. Suruga bordered on Izu, Kai
History of plant systematics (1,111 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of plant systematics—the biological classification of plants—stretches from the work of ancient Greek to modern evolutionary biologists. As
Spice (2,834 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Spices A spice is a seed, fruit, root, bark, or other plant substance primarily used for flavoring, coloring or preserving food. Spices are distinguished
Economic miracle (259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Economic miracle is an informal economic term commonly used to refer to a period of dramatic economic development that is entirely unexpected or unexpectedly
Miles Christianus (554 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and only became prominent after the Protestant Reformation. In the early modern period, the understanding of the term again became more metaphorical, but
Dewa Province (1,033 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dewa Province (出羽国, Dewa no kuni) was a province of Japan comprising modern-day Yamagata Prefecture and Akita Prefecture, except for the city of Kazuno
Drenica (598 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Drenica (Albanian: Drenicë, Drenica, Serbian Cyrillic: Дреница), also known as the Drenica Valley, is a hilly region in central Kosovo, covering roughly
Physiology (3,288 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Physiology (/ˌfɪziˈɒlədʒi/; from Ancient Greek φύσις (physis), meaning 'nature, origin', and -λογία (-logia), meaning 'study of') is the scientific study
Esther Forbes (763 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Esther Louise Forbes (/fɔːrbz/; June 28, 1891 – August 12, 1967) was an American novelist, historian and children's writer who received the Pulitzer Prize
Edict of toleration (1,293 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
An edict of toleration is a declaration, made by a government or ruler, and states that members of a given religion will not be persecuted for engaging
Svrljig (734 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Svrljig (Serbian Cyrillic: Сврљиг, [sʋř̩ʎiːɡ]) is a town and municipality located in the Nišava District of the southern Serbia. According to 2011 census
Anya Seton (665 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anya Seton (January 23, 1904 – November 8, 1990), born Ann Seton, was an American author of historical romances, or as she preferred they be called, "biographical
Ian Mortimer (historian) (1,045 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Ian James Forrester Mortimer, FSA, FRHistS (born 22 September 1967) is a British historian and writer of historical fiction. He is best known for his book
Ford Madox Ford (2,522 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ford Madox Ford (né Ford Hermann Hueffer (/ˈhɛfər/ HEF-ər); 17 December 1873 – 26 June 1939) was an English novelist, poet, critic and editor whose journals
Gronant (203 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Elis Gruffydd (c. 1490-c. 1552), a noted Welsh chronicler of the early modern period. A soldier who served in the English garrison at Calais, Gruffudd's
Völklingen (228 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Völklingen is a town in the district of Saarbrücken, in Saarland, Germany. It is situated on the river Saar, approx. 10 km west of Saarbrücken, and directly
Howitzer (2,904 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A howitzer /ˈhaʊ.ɪtsər/ is a type of artillery piece characterized by a short barrel and the use of small propellant charges to propel projectiles over
Rye House, Hertfordshire (821 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rye House near Hoddesdon in Hertfordshire is a former fortified manor house, located in what is now the Lee Valley Regional Park. The gatehouse is the
Hilary Mantel (3,558 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dame Hilary Mary Mantel, DBE, FRSL (/mænˈtɛl/ man-TEL; née Thompson; born 6 July 1952) is an English writer whose work includes historical fiction, personal
Anagram (4,086 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Dictionary of the English Language. They became hugely popular in the Early Modern period, especially in Germany. Any historical material on anagrams must
Eugène Sue (1,094 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Marie-Joseph "Eugène" Sue (French pronunciation: ​[ø.ʒɛn sy]; 26 January 1804 – 3 August 1857) was a French novelist. He was one of several authors who
Philosopher's stone (2,745 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The philosopher's stone, more properly philosophers' stone or stone of the philosophers (Latin: lapis philosophorum) is a legendary alchemical substance
Winston Graham (1,615 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Winston Mawdsley Graham OBE, born Winston Grime (30 June 1908 – 10 July 2003), was an English novelist best known for the Poldark series of historical
Laurie Halse Anderson (1,794 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Laurie Halse Anderson is an American writer, known for children's and young adult novels. She received the Margaret A. Edwards Award from the American
Ranged weapon (940 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A ranged weapon is any weapon that can engage targets beyond hand-to-hand distance, i.e. at distances greater than the physical reach of the weapon itself
Nigel Tranter (1,492 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nigel Tranter OBE (23 November 1909 – 9 January 2000) was a Scottish author. He was a prolific author of architectural and history books about castles
Rococo (6,543 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rococo (/rəˈkoʊkoʊ/, also US: /ˌroʊkəˈkoʊ/), less commonly roccoco or Late Baroque, is an exceptionally ornamental and theatrical style of architecture
John Jakes (935 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John William Jakes (born March 31, 1932) is an American writer, best known for American historical fiction. His Civil War trilogy, North and South, has
Barawa (1,014 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
battle, the city of Barawa quickly recovered from the attack. In the early modern period, Barawa was ruled by the Geledi Sultanate. Eventually, in 1910, Barawa
Berbera (3,194 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of commercial port cities along the Somali seaboard. During the early modern period, Berbera was the most important place of trade in the entire Horn
Greek Cypriots (2,130 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
‹ The template Infobox ethnic group is being considered for merging. › Greek Cypriots (Greek: Ελληνοκύπριοι, Turkish: Kıbrıs Rumları or Kıbrıs Yunanları)
Hoogstraten (992 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For people with this surname, see Hoogstraten (surname) Hoogstraten (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈɦoːxstraːtə(n)]) is a municipality located in the Belgian province
Conzano (854 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Commune of Conzano (Italian: Comune di Conzano; Piemontese: Consan) is a municipality located in the south of Casale Monferrato, in the north-west
Timeline of clothing and textiles technology (2,400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This timeline of clothing and textiles technology covers the events of fiber and flexible woven material worn on the body; including making, modification
Liberty (personification) (1,733 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Depictions of Liberty The concept of liberty has frequently been represented by personifications, often loosely shown as a female classical goddess. Examples
Emanuel Raphael Belilios (2,318 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
The Sephardic Diaspora, Livorno, and Cross-cultural Trade in the Early Modern Period. Yale University Press. ISBN 0300156200. results, search (25 September
La Tour-d'Aigues (446 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
La Tour-d'Aigues is a commune in the Vaucluse department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region in southeastern France. The town is located at the south
Classical language (2,422 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A classical language is a language with a literature that is classical. According to UC Berkeley linguist George L. Hart, a classical language "should
Divine right of kings (4,805 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The divine right of kings, divine right, or God's mandate is a political and religious doctrine of royal and political legitimacy. It stems from a specific
Barber surgeon (957 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The barber surgeon, one of the most common European medical practitioners of the Middle Ages, was generally charged with caring for soldiers during and
Ottoman–Portuguese conflicts (1586–1589) (1,468 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Hormuz: Portuguese Interactions in the Persian Gulf Region in the Early Modern Period. Calouste Gulbunkian Foundation, p. 47 Svat Soucek (2008): The Portuguese
Spada da lato (350 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
and the immediate predecessor (or early form) of the rapier of the Early Modern period. Its use was taught in the Dardi school of Italian fencing, and was
Anglo-French Wars (429 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anglo-French Wars were a series of conflicts between England (and after 1707, Britain) and France, including: Anglo-French War (1109–1113) – First conflict
Barber surgeon (957 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The barber surgeon, one of the most common European medical practitioners of the Middle Ages, was generally charged with caring for soldiers during and
Ottoman–Portuguese conflicts (1586–1589) (1,468 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Hormuz: Portuguese Interactions in the Persian Gulf Region in the Early Modern Period. Calouste Gulbunkian Foundation, p. 47 Svat Soucek (2008): The Portuguese
James Clavell (2,672 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James Clavell (born Charles Edmund Dumaresq Clavell, 10 October 1921 – 6 September 1994), was an Australian (and later naturalized American) novelist,
Anglo-French Wars (429 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anglo-French Wars were a series of conflicts between England (and after 1707, Britain) and France, including: Anglo-French War (1109–1113) – First conflict
Howard Fast (2,639 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Howard Melvin Fast (November 11, 1914 – March 12, 2003) was an American novelist and television writer. Fast also wrote under the pen names E. V. Cunningham
Mongolian name (2,647 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mongolian names have undergone a number of changes in the history of Mongolia, both with regard to their meaning and their source languages. In modern
Birdoswald (451 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Birdoswald is a former farm in the civil parish of Waterhead in the English county of Cumbria (formerly in Cumberland). It stands on the site of the Roman
List of people from West Bengal (1,860 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of notable people from West Bengal, India. This list does not include the significant number of prominent East Bengali refugees from East
Emma Donoghue (1,865 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emma Donoghue (born 24 October 1969) is an Irish-Canadian playwright, literary historian, novelist, and screenwriter. Her 2010 novel Room was a finalist
Cotton Mather (10,025 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cotton Mather /ˈmæðər/ FRS (February 12, 1663 – February 13, 1728; A.B. 1678, Harvard College; A.M. 1681, honorary doctorate 1710, University of Glasgow)
Mary Johnston (1,293 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mary Johnston (November 21, 1870 – May 9, 1936) was an American novelist and women's rights advocate from Virginia. She was one of America's best selling
Penmaenmawr (1,911 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Penmaenmawr (/ˈpɛnmaɪnˌmaʊr/) is a town and community in Conwy County Borough, Wales, which was formerly in the parish of Dwygyfylchi. It is on the North
Dildo (4,001 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A dildo is a sex toy, often explicitly phallic in appearance, intended for sexual penetration or other sexual activity during masturbation or with sex
Rafael Sabatini (1,861 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rafael Sabatini (29 April 1875 – 13 February 1950) was an Italian-English writer of romance and adventure novels. He is best known for his worldwide bestsellers:
Baton (military) (1,173 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The ceremonial baton is a short, thick stick-like object, typically in wood or metal, that is traditionally the sign of a field marshal or a similar very
Divination (3,233 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Divination (from Latin divinare "to foresee, to foretell, to predict, to prophesy ", related to divinus, divine), or "to be inspired by a god", is the
Greeks in Romania (1,228 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Greeks are a historic minority group in Romania. At times, as during the Phanariote era, this presence has amounted to hegemony; at other times (including
Temporal power of the Holy See (1,395 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The temporal power of the Holy See designates the political and secular influence of the Holy See, the leading of a State by the pope of the Catholic Church
Felicity Heal (632 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Felicity Margaret Heal, FRHistS, FBA (born 24 September 1945) is a British historian and academic, specialising in early modern Britain. From 1980 to 2011
18th century (6,020 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 18th century lasted from January 1, 1701 to December 31, 1800. During the 18th century, elements of Enlightenment thinking culminated in the American
Panache (487 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
courage, derived from the helmet-plume worn by cavalrymen in the Early Modern period. The literal translation is a plume, such as is worn on a hat or
Clemence Dane (1,062 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Clemence Dane was the pseudonym of Winifred Ashton (21 February 1888 – 28 March 1965), an English novelist and playwright. After completing her education
White Carniola (1,694 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
White Carniola (Slovene: Bela krajina; German: Weißkrain or Weiße Mark) is a traditional region in southeastern Slovenia on the border with Croatia. Due
Aparan (1,513 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aparan (Armenian: Ապարան), is a town and urban municipal community in Armenia, located in the Aragatsotn Province, about 50 kilometers northwest of the
Quinto, Aragon (1,771 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Quinto (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkinto]) is a town and municipality in the province of Zaragoza, northeast Spain. It is located on the south bank of the
Lefkada (1,614 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lefkada (Greek: Λευκάδα, Lefkáda, [lefˈkaða]), also known as Lefkas or Leukas (Ancient Greek and Katharevousa: Λευκάς, Leukás, modern pronunciation Lefkás)
LGBT history in India (2,364 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
LGBT in India has been documented for different times. In recent times the unbanning of homosexuality and promotion of LGBT rights has caused large amount
Eiji Yoshikawa (1,232 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eiji Yoshikawa (吉川 英治, Yoshikawa Eiji, August 11, 1892 – September 7, 1962) was a Japanese historical novelist. Among his best-known novels are revisions
Târnăveni (1,103 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Târnăveni (Romanian pronunciation: [tɨrnəˈvenʲ]; Hungarian: Dicsőszentmárton, Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈdit͡ʃøːsɛntmaːrton] (listen); German: Sankt Martin
Jane Porter (925 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jane Porter (17 January 1776 – 24 May 1850) was an English historical novelist, dramatist and literary figure. Her work The Scottish Chiefs is seen as
Serbian nobility (310 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Serbian nobility (Serbian: српска властела / srpska vlastela, српско властелинство / srpsko vlastelinstvo or српско племство / srpsko plemstvo) refers
Paganism (4,661 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paganism (from classical Latin pāgānus "rural, rustic," later "civilian") is a term first used in the fourth century by early Christians for people in
Eiji Yoshikawa (1,232 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eiji Yoshikawa (吉川 英治, Yoshikawa Eiji, August 11, 1892 – September 7, 1962) was a Japanese historical novelist. Among his best-known novels are revisions
Jane Porter (925 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jane Porter (17 January 1776 – 24 May 1850) was an English historical novelist, dramatist and literary figure. Her work The Scottish Chiefs is seen as
Christmas in Scotland (973 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
being closely linked in Scotland during the Late Middle Ages and the Early Modern period. A 1640 Act of the Parliament of Scotland abolished the "Yule vacation
Philippa Gregory (2,069 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Philippa Gregory (born 9 January 1954) is an English historical novelist who has been publishing since 1987. The best known of her works is The Other Boleyn
Robert W. Chambers (2,317 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert William Chambers (May 26, 1865 – December 16, 1933) was an American artist and fiction writer, best known for his book of short stories titled The
Patten (shoe) (1,888 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Pattens are protective overshoes that were worn in Europe from the Middle Ages until the early 20th century. Pattens were worn outdoors over a normal shoe
History of the Jews in Wales (1,261 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
‹ The template Infobox ethnic group is being considered for merging. › The history of the Jews in Wales begins in the Middle Ages. In the 13th century
Neoclassicism (6,959 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Neoclassicism (also spelled Neo-classicism; from Greek νέος nèos, "new" and Greek κλασικός klasikόs, "of the highest rank") was a Western cultural movement
Learned medicine (626 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Learned medicine is the European medical tradition in the Early Modern period, when it experienced the tension between the texts derived from ancient
Cinnamon (4,006 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cinnamon (/ˈsɪnəmən/ SIN-ə-mən) is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several tree species from the genus Cinnamomum. Cinnamon is used mainly as an
C. J. Sansom (1,108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christopher John Sansom is a British writer of historical crime novels. He was born in 1952 in Edinburgh and was educated at the University of Birmingham
Puppet monarch (374 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A puppet monarch is a majority figurehead who is installed or patronized by an imperial power in order to provide the appearance of local authority, while
Eastern Orthodoxy in Serbia (527 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
raised to the rank of Patriarchate. During late Middle Ages and Early Modern period, Serbian Patriarchate of Peć (1346-1766) had at its peak more than
Jewish persecutions during the Black Death (1,881 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Black Death persecutions and massacres were a series of violent attacks on Jewish communities blamed for outbreaks of the Black Death in Europe from
Chateau des Marais, Guernsey (788 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Chateau des Marais is a protected chateau in Saint Sampson, Guernsey. The colloquial name is Ivy Castle. A moated medieval castle dating from before
Dennis Wheatley (2,154 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dennis Yeats Wheatley (8 January 1897 – 10 November 1977) was an English writer whose prolific output of thrillers and occult novels made him one of the
Colonisation of Africa (3,494 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of external colonisation of Africa can be dated from ancient, medieval, or modern history, depending on how the term colonisation is defined
Ruthenia (2,201 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ancient Greek: Ῥωσία, Latin: Rus(s)ia, Ruscia, Ruzzia). During the early modern period, the term also acquired several specific meanings. The word Ruthenia
Mary Elizabeth Braddon (1,371 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mary Elizabeth Braddon (4 October 1835 – 4 February 1915) was an English popular novelist of the Victorian era. She is best known for her 1862 sensation
Ann Rinaldi (694 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ann Rinaldi (born August 27, 1934 in New York City) is an American young adult fiction author. She is best known for her historical fiction, including
Colonna family (1,753 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Colonna family, also known as Sciarrillo or Sciarra, is an Italian papal noble family. It was powerful in medieval and Renaissance Rome, supplying
Trefignath (1,397 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Trefignath is a Neolithic burial chamber near Trearddur, south of Holyhead on Holy Island, off Anglesey in Wales. In its most complete form it included
Zamagna (321 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Zamagna (in Italian; Zamanja, Džamanjić or Zamanjić in Serbo-Croatian) was one of the noble families (post-Roman patriciates) of the Republic of Ragusa
Emma Orczy (2,223 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Baroness Emma Magdolna Rozália Mária Jozefa Borbála "Emmuska" Orczy de Orci (/ˈɔːrtsiː/; 23 September 1865 – 12 November 1947) was a Hungarian-born British
Arturo Pérez-Reverte (1,677 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arturo Pérez-Reverte Gutiérrez (born 25 November 1951 in Cartagena) is a Spanish novelist and journalist. He worked as a war correspondent for RTVE and
English church monuments (1,561 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A church monument is an architectural or sculptural memorial to a deceased person or persons, located within a Christian church. It can take various forms
Martial arts timeline (2,555 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This martial arts timeline is designed to help describe the history of the martial arts in a linear fashion. Many of the articles for particular styles
Mouzeil (1,070 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mouzeil is a commune in the Loire-Atlantique department in the Pays de la Loire in western France. Mouzeil can be found in the countryside in the northern
Landsknecht (2,002 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
doppelsöldner, renowned for their use of arquebus and zweihänder in the early modern period. They formed the bulk of the Imperial Army (Holy Roman Empire) from
Osasco (1,793 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Osasco (Portuguese pronunciation: [oˈzasku]) is a municipality in São Paulo State, Brazil, located in the Greater São Paulo and ranking 5th in population
Mouzeil (1,070 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mouzeil is a commune in the Loire-Atlantique department in the Pays de la Loire in western France. Mouzeil can be found in the countryside in the northern
Montenegro–Russia relations (1,494 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Montenegro–Russia relations (Russian: Российско-черногорские отношения) are foreign relations between Montenegro and Russia. Montenegro has an embassy
Ethiopian Empire (3,827 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
of Tigray killed Iyoas I and replaced him with Yohannes II. The Early Modern period was one of intense cultural and artistic creation. Notable philosophers
Osasco (1,793 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Osasco (Portuguese pronunciation: [oˈzasku]) is a municipality in São Paulo State, Brazil, located in the Greater São Paulo and ranking 5th in population
Syrmia (2,356 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Syrmia (Croatian: Srijem, Serbian: Срем, romanized: Srem) is a region of the southern Pannonian Plain, which lies between the Danube and Sava rivers. It
Pješivci (516 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pješivci (Serbian and Montenegrin: Пјешивци; pronounced [pjê̞ʃiːʋt͡si]) was a tribe in Old Montenegro (part of modern Montenegro), consisting of numerous
Maryse Condé (1,724 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maryse Condé (née Boucolon; February 11, 1937) is a French (Guadeloupean) novelist, critic, and playwright. Condé is best known for her novel Ségou (1984–1985)
Rollright Stones (5,773 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
*rodland 'wheel enclosure' refers to the King's Men circle. By the Early Modern period, folkloric stories had grown up around the Stones, telling of how
Germ theory of disease (4,641 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The germ theory of disease is the currently accepted scientific theory for many diseases. It states that microorganisms known as pathogens or "germs" can
Kathleen Winsor (946 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kathleen Winsor (October 16, 1919 – May 26, 2003) was an American author. She is best known for her first work, the 1944 historical novel Forever Amber
Slonim (1,817 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Slonim (Belarusian: Сло́нім, Russian: Сло́ним, Lithuanian: Slanimas, Polish: Słonim, Yiddish: סלאָנים‎, Slonim) is a city in Grodno Region, Belarus, capital
David Lindsay (novelist) (1,047 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
David Lindsay (3 March 1876 – 16 July 1945) was a British author best remembered for the philosophical science fiction novel A Voyage to Arcturus (1920)
Max Brand (1,084 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Frederick Schiller Faust (May 29, 1892 – May 12, 1944) was an American author known primarily for his Western stories using the pseudonym Max Brand. He
Outline of war (3,235 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to war: War – organised and often prolonged armed conflict that is carried out by
Kathryn Lasky (1,398 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kathryn Lasky (born June 24, 1944) is an American children's writer who also writes for adults under the names Kathryn Lasky Knight and E. L. Swann. Her
Kratovo, North Macedonia (1,515 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kratovo (Macedonian: Кратово [ˈkratɔvɔ] (listen)) is a small town in North Macedonia. It is the seat of Kratovo Municipality. It lies on the western slopes
East Lothian (2,798 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
East Lothian (/ˈloʊðiən/; Scottish Gaelic: Lodainn an Ear) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, as well as a historic county, registration county
Serbian literature (1,828 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Serbian literature (Serbian: Српска књижевност/Srpska književnost) refers to literature written in Serbian and/or in Serbia and all other lands where Serbs
Tatars of Romania (1,394 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tatars of Romania (Romanian: Tătarii din România) or Dobrujan Tatars (Crimean Tatar: Dobruca tatarları), are a Turkic ethnic group, have been present in
Vermeer's Hat (1,793 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vermeer's Hat: The Seventeenth Century and the Dawn of the Global World is a book by the Canadian historian Professor Timothy Brook, in which he explores
Military history of England (1,099 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The military history of England and Wales deals with the period prior to the creation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain in 1707. For the period after
Dorothy Dunnett (2,157 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dorothy Dunnett OBE (née Halliday, 25 August 1923 – 9 November 2001) was a Scottish historical novelist. She is best known for her six-part series about
Kingdom of Sicily (5,976 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Kingdom of Sicily (Latin: Regnum Siciliae, Italian: Regno di Sicilia, Sicilian: Regnu di Sicilia, Catalan: Regne de Sicília, Spanish: Reino de Sicilia)
History of Rajasthan (2,507 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The state of Rajasthan in India has a history dating back thousands of years. It was the site of the Indus Valley Civilization. The early medieval period
Rosemary Sutcliff (2,681 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rosemary Sutcliff CBE (14 December 1920 – 23 July 1992) was an English novelist best known for children's books, especially historical fiction and retellings
Charles De Coster (639 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles-Theodore-Henri De Coster (20 August 1827 – 7 May 1879) was a Belgian novelist whose efforts laid the basis for a native Belgian literature. He
Patrick O'Brian (4,865 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Patrick O'Brian, CBE (12 December 1914 – 2 January 2000), born Richard Patrick Russ, was an English novelist and translator, best known for his Aubrey–Maturin
Female hysteria (3,258 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Female hysteria was once a common medical diagnosis for women, which was described as exhibiting a wide array of symptoms, including anxiety, shortness
David Caute (766 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John David Caute (born 16 December 1936 in Alexandria, Egypt) is a British author, novelist, playwright, historian and journalist. Caute was educated at
Poltava (3,259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Poltava (UK: /pɒlˈtɑːvə/, US: /pəlˈ-/; Ukrainian: Полтава [polˈtɑwɐ]; Russian: Полтава [pɐlˈtavə]) is a city located on the Vorskla River in central Ukraine
Komarpant (574 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
‹ The template Infobox ethnic group is being considered for merging. › The Komarpanth (or Komarpant naik or Comorpaica) are a social group centred in and
Stanley J. Weyman (1,100 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Stanley John Weyman (pronounced [waɪ mæn], 7 August 1855 – 10 April 1928) was an English writer of historical romance. His most popular works were written
Dubno (1,825 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dubno (Ukrainian: Ду́бно, Polish: Dubno) is a city located on the Ikva River in Rivne Oblast (province) of western Ukraine. Serving as the administrative
Early Modern English (4,773 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Because those phonemes were in such a state of flux during the whole Early Modern period (with evidence of rhyming occurring among them as well as with the
Charles De Coster (639 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles-Theodore-Henri De Coster (20 August 1827 – 7 May 1879) was a Belgian novelist whose efforts laid the basis for a native Belgian literature. He
Kingdom of France (5,264 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
begin with and was only incorporated into the kingdom during the early modern period. Territories inherited from Western Francia: Domain of the Frankish
Tim Willocks (269 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tim Willocks is a British physician and novelist (Born 27 October 1957) in Stalybridge, Cheshire, England. Willocks studied medicine at the University
Budbrooke (1,372 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Budbrooke is a small village and civil parish in the Warwick district of Warwickshire, England, about 2½ miles west of Warwick town centre. According to
History of Karnataka (2,989 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of Karnataka goes back more than two millennia. Several great empires and dynasties have ruled over Karnataka and have contributed greatly
Taylor Caldwell (1,807 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Janet Miriam Holland Taylor Caldwell (September 7, 1900 – August 30, 1985) was a British-born American novelist and prolific author of popular fiction
St Columb Major (2,928 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
St Columb Major is a town and civil parish in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. Often referred to locally as St Columb, it is approximately seven miles
Emilio Salgari (2,168 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emilio Salgari (Italian pronunciation: [eˈmiːljo salˈɡaːri] but often erroneously pronounced [ˈsalɡari] ; 21 August 1862 – 25 April 1911) was an Italian
Sultanate of Women (1,575 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
mothers of the Sultans of the Ottoman Empire. This phenomenon in the early modern period, approximately between the years 1533 and 1656, began during the
Watton-at-Stone (2,041 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Watton-at-Stone is a village in the English county of Hertfordshire, situated midway between the towns of Stevenage and Hertford in the valley of the River
Isolationism (1,537 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Mary Elizabeth Berry, Japan in Print: Information and Nation in the Early Modern Period, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006. Albert Craig, Chōshū
Baroque (10,766 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Baroque (UK: /bəˈrɒk/, US: /bəˈroʊk/; French: [baʁɔk]) is a style of architecture, music, dance, painting, sculpture and other arts that flourished
Treaty of Perpetual Peace (749 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Treaty of Perpetual Peace was signed by James IV of Scotland and Henry VII of England in 1502. It agreed to end the intermittent warfare between Scotland
Ottoman–Habsburg wars (6,224 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Ottoman–Habsburg wars were fought from the 16th through the 18th centuries between the Ottoman Empire and the Habsburg Monarchy, which was at times
Carolly Erickson (245 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Carolly Erickson (born January 1, 1943) is an American author of historical fiction and non-fiction. She lives in Hawaii. In 2008, her book The Tsarina's
Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies (193 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies (CREMS) was launched in October 2005 at the University of York. It is focused on the study of the 16th
Cerridwen Fallingstar (2,652 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cerridwen Fallingstar (born Cheri Lesh, November 15, 1952), is an American Wiccan Priestess, Shamanic Witch, and author. Since the late 1970s she has written
Ghent (4,143 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ghent (/ɡɛnt/; Dutch: Gent [ɣɛnt] (listen); French: Gand [ɡɑ̃] (listen), traditional English Gaunt) is a city and a municipality in the Flemish Region
Susanna Gregory (832 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Susanna Gregory is the pseudonym of Elizabeth Cruwys, a Cambridge academic who was previously a coroner's officer. She writes detective fiction, and is
Brian Cleeve (2,355 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Brian Brendon Talbot Cleeve (22 November 1921 – 11 March 2003) was a writer, whose published works include twenty-one novels and over a hundred short stories
History of same-sex unions (3,341 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a history of same-sex unions in cultures around the world. Various types of same-sex unions have existed, ranging from informal, unsanctioned,
Politics of Fidel Castro (1,657 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Thus, Marxists believe that capitalism replaced feudalism in the early modern period as the wealthy industrial class, or bourgeoisie, took political and
Charge (warfare) (4,417 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
A charge is a maneuver in battle in which combatants advance towards their enemy at their best speed in an attempt to engage in close combat, most commonly
Vale Castle, Guernsey (1,263 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vale Castle, is a protected building located in the Vale, Guernsey. The original name was "Le Chateau St Michel", later it became "Chateau de Val" or "Chateau
Hadrumetum (1,301 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Vandal, Byzantine, and Umayyad conquerors left it ruined. In the early modern period, it was the village of Hammeim, now part of Sousse, Tunisia. The
Habr Awal (3,223 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Berbera which was the capital of Habar Awal Sultanate during the early modern period. With the strongly centralized ports of Berbera, Bulhar, Ceel-Sheekh
John Buchan (4,729 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir GCMG GCVO CH PC (/ˈbʌxən/; 26 August 1875 – 11 February 1940) was a Scottish novelist, historian, and Unionist politician
Historiography of Switzerland (1,951 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The historiography of Switzerland is the study of the history of Switzerland. Early accounts of the history of the Old Swiss Confederacy are found in the
Hadrumetum (1,301 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Vandal, Byzantine, and Umayyad conquerors left it ruined. In the early modern period, it was the village of Hammeim, now part of Sousse, Tunisia. The
Charles Major (writer) (511 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Charles Major (July 25, 1856 – February 13, 1913) was an American lawyer and novelist. Born to an upper-middle class Indianapolis family, Major developed
Austria–Czech Republic relations (1,235 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Austria – Czech Republic relations are the neighborly relations between Austria and the Czech Republic, two member states of the European Union. Both countries
Naval boarding (2,665 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Naval boarding is to come up against, or alongside, an enemy ship to attack by placing combatants aboard the enemy ship. The goal of boarding is to capture
Bad Doberan (2,132 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bad Doberan (German pronunciation: [baːt dobəˈʁaːn]) is a town in the district of Rostock, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany. It was the capital of the former
Bernoulli family (664 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
substantially to the development of mathematics and physics during the early modern period. Originally from Antwerp, a branch of the family relocated to Basel
Chalcis (2,948 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Chalcis (/ˈkælsɪs/; Ancient Greek & Katharevousa: Χαλκίς, Chalkís) or Chalkida (Modern Greek: Χαλκίδα, romanized: Halkídha, [xalˈciða]) is the chief town
Great Britain (7,093 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Great Britain is an island in the North Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), it is
History of clothing in the Indian subcontinent (3,614 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
History of clothing in the Indian subcontinent can be traced to the Indus Valley Civilization or earlier. Indians have mainly worn clothing made up of
Christian apologetics (4,703 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christian apologetics (Greek: ἀπολογία, "verbal defence, speech in defence") is a branch of Christian theology that defends Christianity against objections
Złotoryja (1,852 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Złotoryja [zwɔtɔˈrɨja] (German: Goldberg, Latin: Aureus Mons, Aurum) is a historic town in Lower Silesian Voivodeship in southwestern Poland, the administrative
Moravian Wallachia (1,057 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Moravian Wallachia (Czech: Moravské Valašsko, or simply Valašsko; Romanian: Valahia Moravă), is a mountainous ethnoregion located in the easternmost part
Nijmegen (3,811 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nijmegen (/ˈnaɪmeɪɡən/ NY-may-gən, Dutch: [ˈnɛimeːɣə(n)] (listen);, Nijmeegs: Nimwèège [ˈnɪmβ̞ɛːxə]) is a city in the Netherlands' province of Gelderland
Jōkamachi (1,175 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jin'yamachi. It is also referred to as Jōka as was common before the early modern period. The advent of Jōkamachi dates back to the Sengoku period (period
British philosophy (3,488 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
British philosophy refers to the philosophical tradition of the British people. "The native characteristics of British philosophy are these: common sense
Tim Severin (1,805 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tim Severin (born 25 September 1940) is a British explorer, historian and writer. Severin is noted for his work in retracing the legendary journeys of
Warwick Deeping (1,356 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Warwick Deeping (28 May 1877 – 20 April 1950) was an English novelist and short story writer, whose best-known novel was Sorrell and Son (1925)
History of martial arts (3,744 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
and is subject to the changes of fencing fashion throughout the Early Modern period. It establishes itself as the separate style of Mensur fencing in
Intersex rights in Malta (1,437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Intersex rights in Malta since 2015 are among the most progressive in the world. Intersex children in Malta have world-first protections from non-consensual
William Harrison Ainsworth (4,309 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
William Harrison Ainsworth (4 February 1805 – 3 January 1882) was an English historical novelist born at King Street in Manchester. He trained as a lawyer
Margaret George (992 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret George is an American historical novelist specializing in epic fictional biographies. She is known for her meticulous research and the large scale
Twardogóra (921 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Twardogóra [tfardɔˈɡura] (formerly Old Polish: Twarda Góra (Hard Mountain), German: Festenberg) is a town in Oleśnica County, Lower Silesian Voivodeship
Protests against early modern witch trials (2,520 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Throughout the era of the European witch trials in the Early Modern period, from the 15th to the 18th century, there were protests against both the belief
Werne (893 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Werne an der Lippe (Westphalian: Wäen) is a town in the Federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia in the Unna district in Germany. It is located on the southern
H. F. M. Prescott (495 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hilda Frances Margaret Prescott, more usually known as H. F. M. Prescott (22 February 1896–1972), was an English author, academic and historian. She was
Mardani khel (909 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mardani khel is an armed Indian martial art from Maharashtra. It is particularly known for its use of the uniquely Indian patta (sword) and vita (corded
Essaouira (3,320 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Essaouira (Arabic: الصويرة‎; Berber: Taṣṣort or Amegdul; Portuguese: Mogador) is a city in the western Moroccan region of Meṛṛakec-Asfi, on the Atlantic
Plate armour (3,244 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Plate armour is a historical type of personal body armour made from bronze, iron or steel plates, culminating in the iconic suit of armour entirely encasing
History of lesbianism (5,226 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lesbianism is the sexual and romantic desire between females. There are historically far fewer mentions of lesbianism than male homosexuality, due to many
Susan Kay (305 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Susan Kay (born 1952) is a British writer, the author of two award-winning novels: Legacy and Phantom. Kay was born on 1952 in Manchester, England. She
Barbara Willard (503 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Barbara Mary Willard (12 March 1909 – 18 February 1994) was a British novelist best known for children's historical fiction. Her "Mantlemass Chronicles"
Acton, London (3,706 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Acton (/ˈæktən/) is an area of west London, England, within the London Borough of Ealing. It is 6.1 miles (10 km) west of Charing Cross. It lies within
History of Delhi (4,124 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
control of Delhi and the right to collect chauth from the Mughals. The early modern period in Indian history is marked with the rise of the Mughal Empire between
Irish art (1,977 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The history of Irish art starts around 3200 BC with Neolithic stone carvings at the Newgrange megalithic tomb, part of the Brú na Bóinne complex which
Bulhar (828 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bulhar (Somali: Bulaxaar) is a historic port in the Sahil region of Somaliland with routes dating back to antiquity. The port was rejuvenated in the 19th
Acton, London (3,706 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Acton (/ˈæktən/) is an area of west London, England, within the London Borough of Ealing. It is 6.1 miles (10 km) west of Charing Cross. It lies within
Steinar Imsen (156 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Technology. His field of concentration is the Late Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period (c. 1300–1700). Imsen has also worked as editor of Norsk historisk
Hotin County (739 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Hotin County was a county (ținut is Middle Ages and Early Modern Period, județ after) in the Principality of Moldavia (1359-1812), the Governorate of
Burngreave (1,832 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Burngreave is an inner city district of Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England lying north of the city centre. The population of the ward taken at the 2011
Vinnytsia (2,581 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vinnytsia or Vinnytsya, or Vinnitsa (/ˈvɪnɪts(j)ə, ˈviːn-/ VIN-it-s(y)ə, VEEN-; Ukrainian: Вінниця, romanized: Vinnycja, IPA: [ˈwinːɪtsʲɐ] (listen); Russian:
Cosmo Hamilton (1,000 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cosmo Hamilton (abt 1871 – 14 October 1942), born Charles Joseph Hamilton Gibbs, was an English playwright and novelist. He was the brother of writers
Myōjin (1,025 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
shining/apparent deity (大明神) and save all sentient beings." Up until the early modern period, use of titles such as myōjin or gongen for many deities and their
Barbara Willard (503 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Barbara Mary Willard (12 March 1909 – 18 February 1994) was a British novelist best known for children's historical fiction. Her "Mantlemass Chronicles"
Alphons (1,329 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alphons (Latinized Alphonsus, Adelphonsus, or Adefonsus) is a male given name recorded from the 8th century (Alfonso I of Asturias, r. 739-757) in the
Pre-Marxist communism (1,625 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
While Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels defined communism as a political movement, there were already similar ideas in the past which one could call communist
Robin Maxwell (author) (200 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Robin Maxwell (born February 26, 1948) is an American historical novelist who specializes in the Tudor period. She is also a screenwriter and political
Venad (2,909 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Kolathunadu), Kozhikode and Kochi (Perumpadappu) in medieval and early modern period. Rulers of Venad trace their ancestry to the Vel chieftains related
William and Mary style (1,415 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
What later came to be known as the William and Mary style is a furniture design common from 1700 to 1725 in the Netherlands, the Kingdom of England, the
Ballroom dance (4,773 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ballroom dance is a set of partner dances, which are enjoyed both socially and competitively around the world. Because of its performance and entertainment
Mentalism (philosophy) (234 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
representation-first philosophers (what John Sergeant calls 'Ideism') common in the Early Modern period, including such philosophers as René Descartes, John Locke, George
Cynthia Harrod-Eagles (1,249 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cynthia Harrod-Eagles is a British writer of romance and mystery novels. She normally writes under her own name but also uses the pseudonyms Emma Woodhouse
German literature (2,976 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
German literature comprises those literary texts written in the German language. This includes literature written in Germany, Austria, the German parts
Jack Lindsay (2,422 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jack Lindsay (20 October 1900 – 8 March 1990) was an Australian-born writer, who from 1926 lived in the United Kingdom, initially in Essex. He was born
Naomi Mitchison (4,272 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Naomi Mary Margaret Mitchison, Baroness Mitchison, CBE (née Haldane; 1 November 1897 – 11 January 1999) was a Scottish novelist and poet. Often called
Walter Macken (382 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Walter Macken (3 May 1915 - 22 April 1967) (Irish Uaitéar Ó Maicín), was born in Galway, Ireland. He was a writer of short stories, novels and plays. Walter
Hartlib Circle (1,725 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Hartlib Circle was the correspondence network set up in Western and Central Europe by Samuel Hartlib, an intelligencer based in London, and his associates
Jodhpur (3,948 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jodhpur (/ˈdʒɒdpʊər/; pronounced [ˈd͡ʒoːd̪ʱpʊr] pronunciation (help·info)) is the second-largest city in the Indian state of Rajasthan and officially the
Bari (4,422 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bari (/ˈbɑːri/ BAR-ee, Italian: [ˈbaːri] (listen); Barese: Bare [ˈbæːrə]; Latin: Barium; Ancient Greek: Βάριον, romanized: Bárion) is the capital city
Anthony Burgess (7,272 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Anthony Burgess Wilson, FRSL (/ˈbɜːrdʒəs/; 25 February 1917 – 22 November 1993), who published under the name Anthony Burgess, was an English writer
Hand fan (3,696 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A handheld fan, or simply hand fan, may be any broad, flat surface that is waved back-and-forth to create an airflow. Generally, purpose-made handheld
Margaret Oliphant (3,187 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret Oliphant Wilson Oliphant (born Margaret Oliphant Wilson; 4 April 1828 – 20 June 1897) was a Scottish novelist and historical writer, who usually
Searches for Noah's Ark (3,341 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Searches for Noah's Ark have been made from at least the time of Eusebius (c.275–339) to the present day. Despite many expeditions, no physical proof of
Evelyn Everett-Green (2,351 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Evelyn Ward Everett-Green (17 November 1856 in London – 23 April 1932 in Funchal) was an English novelist who started with improving, pious stories for
Ethiopia–Somalia relations (1,291 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ethiopia–Somalia relations (Somali: Xiriirka Itoobiya-Soomaaliya) are bilateral relations between Ethiopia and Somalia. These relations are characterized
D. K. Broster (1,005 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dorothy Kathleen Broster (2 September 1877 – 7 February 1950), usually known as D. K. Broster, was an English novelist and short-story writer. Her fiction
James S. Shapiro (879 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Literature at Columbia University who specialises in Shakespeare and the Early Modern period. Shapiro has served on the faculty at Columbia University since 1985
Ethiopia–Somalia relations (1,291 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ethiopia–Somalia relations (Somali: Xiriirka Itoobiya-Soomaaliya) are bilateral relations between Ethiopia and Somalia. These relations are characterized
Swinside (1,446 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
was defined by the inclusion of two outer portal stones. In the Early Modern period, local folklore about the stones held that they had once been used
James S. Shapiro (879 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Literature at Columbia University who specialises in Shakespeare and the Early Modern period. Shapiro has served on the faculty at Columbia University since 1985
Wychbold (2,211 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Wychbold is a village in the Wychavon district of Worcestershire. The village is situated on the A38 between Droitwich Spa and Bromsgrove, and by Junction
Hindu art (4,083 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hindu art Hindu art encompasses the artistic traditions and styles culturally connected to Hinduism and have a long history of religious association with
Paul C. Doherty (1,933 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paul Charles Dominic Doherty OBE (born 21 September 1946) is an award-winning English author, educator, lecturer and historian. He is also the Headmaster
Quarantine (9,410 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A quarantine is a restriction on the movement of people and goods which is intended to prevent the spread of disease or pests. It is often used in connection
Silver coin (2,881 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Silver coins are possibly the oldest mass-produced form of coinage. Silver has been used as a coinage metal since the times of the Greeks; their silver
Waren (Müritz) (2,799 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Waren (Müritz) (also Waren an der Müritz) is a town and climatic spa in the state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. It was the capital of the
Valerie Anand (596 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Valerie Anand (born 1937) is a British author of historical fiction. Under the pen name Fiona Buckley she writes the series of historical mysteries, set
Cauterets (3,144 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cauterets (in Occitan Cautarés, in Catalan Cautarés, in Aragonese Cautarès) is a spa town, a ski resort and a commune in the Hautes-Pyrénées department
Muqata'ah (732 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
life of the buyer. As the Ottoman Empire became to move into the early modern period, “vacant timars, instead of being reassigned, were often added to
Ruedes (117 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
south. There was a leprosería (Leper hospital) in Ruedes during the Early modern period. La Figar La Badolla La Casa Diezmera / La Casa'l Monte Los Coletos
Liège (5,331 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Liège (/liˈɛʒ, liˈeɪʒ/ lee-EZH, lee-AYZH, French: [ljɛʒ] (listen), locally [li.eʃ]; Walloon: Lidje Walloon: [liːtʃ] (listen); Dutch: Luik [lœyk] (listen);
Hungarians (6,660 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
‹ The template Infobox ethnic group is being considered for merging. › Hungarians, also known as Magyars (Hungarian: magyarok), are a nation and ethnic
Tartonne (2,541 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tartonne is a commune in the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence department in southeastern France. The name of the inhabitants is Tartonnais. The village of Tartonne
Pszczyna (2,432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pszczyna [ˈpʂt͡ʂɨna] (English: Pless, German: Pleß, Czech: Pština, formerly: Blština or Blščina, Silesian: Pszczyna) is a town in southern Poland with
Felix (name) (1,693 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Felix is a male given name that stems from Latin (fēlix, felicis) and means "happy" or "lucky". Its female form is Felicity (English)—late 14c., "happiness;
Virginia Henley (799 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Virginia Henley, née Virginia Syddall (born 5 December 1935 in Bolton, England), is a British writer of historical-romance novels. She is well known for
Dalmatia (5,238 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dalmatia (/dælˈmeɪʃə, -tiə/; Croatian: Dalmacija [dǎlmaːtsija]; Italian: Dalmazia; see names in other languages) is one of the four historical regions
Anti-Judaism (4,686 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anti-Judaism is the "total or partial opposition to Judaism—and to Jews as adherents of it—by persons who accept a competing system of beliefs and practices
History of the Jews in Switzerland (2,628 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
‹ The template Infobox ethnic group is being considered for merging. › The history of the Jews in Switzerland extends back at least a thousand years. Jews
Serbs of Romania (1,634 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
‹ The template Infobox ethnic group is being considered for merging. › The Serbs of Romania (Romanian: Sârbii din România, Serbian: Срби у Румунији/Srbi
Lord High Constable of Sweden (1,058 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Lord High Constable (Swedish: Riksmarsk or only Marsk) was a prominent and influential office in Sweden, from the 13th century until 1676, excluding
Suzannah Dunn (273 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Suzannah Dunn is an author and graduate of the MA creative writing programme at the University of East Anglia, in Norwich, United Kingdom. She was Director
Jixi (2,308 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jixi (Chinese: 鸡西; pinyin: Jīxī) is a city in southeastern Heilongjiang Province, People's Republic of China. At the 2010 census, 1,862,165 people resided
Gold coin (4,242 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A gold coin is a coin that is made mostly or entirely of gold. Most gold coins minted since 1800 are 90–92% gold (22 karat), while most of today's gold
Nonsuch Park (1,689 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nonsuch Park /ˈnʌnˌsʌtʃ/ is a public park between Stoneleigh, North Cheam, Cheam, and Ewell on the boundaries of the borough of Epsom and Ewell in Surrey
Old Hungarian script (3,272 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Old Hungarian script or Hungarian runes (Hungarian: Székely-magyar rovás, 'székely-magyar runiform', or rovásírás) is an alphabetic writing system
Margit Sandemo (2,381 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margit Sandemo (née Underdal, 23 April 1924 – 1 September 2018) was a Norwegian-Swedish historical fantasy author. She had been the best-selling author
History of Anguilla (1,722 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from South America, through its colonization by the English in the early modern period, to the present day. Following a series of rebellions and a short-lived
Tavistock (4,664 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tavistock (/ˈtævɪstɒk/ TAV-iss-tok) is an ancient stannary and market town within West Devon, England. It is situated on the River Tavy from which its
Joseph Henry Shorthouse (642 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Henry Shorthouse (9 September 1834 – 4 March 1903) was an English novelist. His first novel, John Inglesant, was particularly admired as a "philosophical
Tavistock (4,664 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tavistock (/ˈtævɪstɒk/ TAV-iss-tok) is an ancient stannary and market town within West Devon, England. It is situated on the River Tavy from which its
History of Switzerland (4,647 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
drawn-out history of internal strife between the Thirteen Cantons in the Early Modern period. In the wake of the French Revolution, Switzerland fell to a French
Carolyn Meyer (508 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Carolyn Meyer (born June 8, 1935) is an American author of novels for children and young adults. The typical genre for her work is historical fiction,
Elizabeth Byrd (965 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Elizabeth Byrd (December 8, 1912 – May 11, 1989) was an American author. Her main body of work is historical fiction, and her most successful novel is
Pitești (4,137 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pitești (Romanian pronunciation: [piˈteʃtʲ]) is a city in Romania, located on the Argeș River. The capital and largest city of Argeș County, it is an important
Inchcolm (2,037 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Inchcolm (from the Scottish Gaelic "Innis Choluim", meaning Columba's Island) is an island in the Firth of Forth in Scotland. It was repeatedly attacked
Joseph Henry Shorthouse (642 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Henry Shorthouse (9 September 1834 – 4 March 1903) was an English novelist. His first novel, John Inglesant, was particularly admired as a "philosophical
Münster (4,184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Münster (/ˈmʊnstər/, also US: /ˈmʌnstər/, German: [ˈmʏnstɐ] (listen); Low Franconian and Low German: Mönster; Latin: Monasterium, from the Greek μοναστήριον
Lord High Steward of Sweden (751 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Lord High Steward or Lord High Justiciar (Swedish: Riksdrots or only Drots) was a highly prominent member of the Swedish Privy Council from the 13th
G. A. Henty (2,813 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Alfred Henty (8 December 1832 – 16 November 1902) was a prolific English novelist and war correspondent. He is best known for his historical adventure
Harold Lamb (1,880 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Harold Albert Lamb (September 1, 1892 – April 9, 1962) was an American historian, screenwriter, short story writer, and novelist. Lamb was born in Alpine
Bashkirs (4,318 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
‹ The template Infobox ethnic group is being considered for merging. › The Bashkirs (/ˈbɑːʃkɪərz/; Bashkir: Башҡорттар, IPA: [bɑʂqʊrtˈtɑr]; Russian: Башкиры
Cleavage (breasts) (5,207 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Cleavage is the exposed area between a woman's breasts lying over the sternum, and refers only to what is visible with clothing (or dense, nontransparent
Arthur D. Howden Smith (562 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arthur D. Howden Smith (1887–1945) was an American historian and novelist. Arthur Douglas Howden Smith was born in New York. In 1907, he joined the VMRO
Kongsvinger Fortress (1,063 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kongsvinger Fortress (Norwegian: Kongsvinger festning) is located in the city and municipality of Kongsvinger in the county of Hedmark, Norway. It is situated
Geoffrey Trease (1,904 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(Robert) Geoffrey Trease FRSL (11 August 1909 – 27 January 1998) was a prolific British writer who published 113 books, mainly for children, between 1934
Groß-Umstadt (1,061 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Groß-Umstadt is a town in the district of Darmstadt-Dieburg in the Bundesland (federal state) of Hessen in Germany. It is near Darmstadt and Frankfurt
Guy Endore (2,210 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Guy Endore (July 4, 1901 – February 12, 1970), born Samuel Goldstein and also known as Harry Relis, was an American novelist and screenwriter. During
Rochlitz (2,520 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rochlitz (German pronunciation: [ˈʁɔxlɪts]; Upper Sorbian: Rochlica) is a major district town (Große Kreisstadt) in the district of Mittelsachsen, in the
Sophia Lee (724 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sophia Lee (1750 – 13 March 1824) was an English novelist, dramatist and educator. She was the daughter of John Lee (died 1781), actor and theatrical manager
Christianity and colonialism (4,631 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Christianity and colonialism are often closely associated because Catholicism and Protestantism were the religions of the European colonial powers and
History of materials science (3,140 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Materials science has shaped the development of civilizations since the dawn of mankind. Better materials for tools and weapons has allowed mankind to
Emili Rosales i Castellà (197 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emili Rosales i Castellà (born February 12, 1968) is a Catalan writer and editor. He began in the field of poetry, but quickly became a novelist. After
Court painter (1,946 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
made up an increasingly large part of their commissions, and in the Early Modern period one person might be appointed solely to do portraits, and another
Karleen Koen (470 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Karleen Koen (née Smith) is an American novelist perhaps best known for her 1986 debut historical fiction novel, Through a Glass Darkly. Karleen Smith
Maureen Peters (novelist) (1,329 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Maureen Peters (3 March 1935 - 8 April 2008) was a historical novelist, under her own name and noms de plume such as Veronica Black, Catherine Darby, Belinda
Walter Scott (9,415 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet FRSE FSA Scot (15 August 1771 – 21 September 1832) was a Scottish historical novelist, poet, playwright, and historian. Many
Assyrian homeland (3,679 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Assyrian homeland or Assyria (Classical Syriac: ܐܬܘܪ‎, romanized: Āṯūr) is a geo-cultural and historical region situated in Northern Mesopotamia that
Kirkmaiden (2,064 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kirkmaiden is a parish in the Rinns of Galloway, the most southerly in Scotland; the present Church of Scotland parish has the same name as and is approximately
Gotland (5,960 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gotland (/ˈɡɒtlənd/; Swedish: [ˈɡɔ̌tːland] (listen); older spellings include Gottland /ˈɡɒtlənd/ or Gothland /ˈɡɒθlənd/; Gutland in the local dialect)
Cardigan, Ceredigion (3,489 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cardigan (Welsh: Aberteifi, pronounced [abɛrˈtəivɪ] (listen)) is a town and community in the county of Ceredigion in Wales. The town lies on a tidal reach
Žumberak Mountains (2,847 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Žumberak Mountains (Croatian: Žumberačka gora, Slovene: Gorjanci, historic German name: Uskokengebirge) is a range of hills and mountains in northwestern
Fricktal (467 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
settlement. Frickgau was part of Breisgau within Further Austria in the early modern period. It was joined to Switzerland only during the Napoleonic period.
Cetinje (4,770 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cetinje (Montenegrin Cyrillic and Serbian Cyrillic: Цетиње [pronounced [ t͡sětiɲe]]), is a city and Old Royal Capital (Montenegrin: Prijestonica / Приjестоница)
Meiningen (3,927 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Meiningen is a town in the southern part of the state of Thuringia, Germany. It is located in the region of Franconia and has a population of around 25
Modern dance (3,631 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
dance can be divided (roughly) into three periods or eras. In the Early Modern period (c. 1880–1923), characterized by the work of Isadora Duncan, Loie
Guernsey (8,200 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Guernsey (/ˈɡɜːrnzi/ (listen); Guernésiais: Guernési) is an island in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy. It lies roughly north of Saint-Malo
European empire (44 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
may refer to: in a historical context, the Colonial empires of the Early Modern period in current usage, a term for the Eurosphere emphasizing a prediction
Xanten (2,665 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Xanten (German pronunciation: [ˈksantən], Lower Franconian Santen) is a town in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is located in the district
H. Bedford-Jones (702 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry James O'Brien Bedford-Jones (April 29, 1887 – May 6, 1949) was a Canadian historical, adventure fantasy, science fiction, crime and Western writer
Gotha (4,564 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gotha (German: [ˈɡoːtaː]) is the fifth-largest city in Thuringia, Germany, located 20 kilometres (12 miles) west of Erfurt and 25 km (16 miles) east of
Francis Marion Crawford (3,229 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Francis Marion Crawford (August 2, 1854 – April 9, 1909) was an American writer noted for his many novels, especially those set in Italy, and for his classic
Margaret Irwin (494 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret Emma Faith Irwin (27 March 1889 – 11 December 1967) was an English historical novelist. She also wrote a factual biography of Sir Walter Raleigh
Marjorie Bowen (2,874 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret Gabrielle Vere Long (née Campbell; 1 November 1885 – 23 December 1952), who used the pseudonym Marjorie Bowen, was a British author who wrote
Royal Foundation of St Katharine (1,560 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
St Katharine's by the Tower (full name Royal Hospital and Collegiate Church of St. Katharine by the Tower) was a medieval church and hospital next to the
Possessions of Sweden (391 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of possessions of Sweden held outside of Sweden proper during the early modern period. Fiefs that were held for a limited time. Scania (Agreement of Helsingborg
William Gibson (historian) (427 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
professor who specialises in the history of religion in Britain in the early modern period. He received BA(Hons) MA (Wales), PGCE (Oxon), PhD (Middlesex), DLitt
John Banim (2,214 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Banim (3 April 1798 – 30 August 1842), was an Irish novelist, short story writer, dramatist, poet and essayist, sometimes called the "Scott of Ireland
Slovak language (4,148 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Slovak within the Czech–Slovak dialect continuum emerged in the early modern period. In the later mid-19th century, the modern Slovak alphabet and written
Shipbuilding in the early modern era (876 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maritime travel experienced a large leap in the capabilities of seafaring vessels thanks to technological improvements in shipbuilding in the early modern
Jena (6,069 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jena (/ˈjeɪnə/; German pronunciation: [ˈjeːna] (listen)) is a German university city and the second largest city in Thuringia. Together with the nearby
Oliver Onions (2,100 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
George Oliver Onions (13 November 1873 – 9 April 1961), who published under the name Oliver Onions, was a British writer of short stories and over 40 novels
Frankwell (771 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 52°42′41″N 2°45′39″W / 52.71139°N 2.76083°W / 52.71139; -2.76083 Frankwell is a district of the town of Shrewsbury, in Shropshire, England
Emily Lawless (1,113 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Hon. Emily Lawless (17 June 1845 – 19 October 1913) was an Irish novelist, historian, entomologist, gardener, and poet from County Kildare. Her innovative
Hebrew Gospel hypothesis (4,158 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Hebrew Gospel hypothesis (or proto-Gospel hypothesis or Aramaic Matthew hypothesis) is a group of theories based on the proposition that a lost gospel
History of the Serbs (3,929 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The History of the Serbs spans from the Early Middle Ages to present. Serbs, a South Slavic people, traditionally live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia