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Dirac (video compression format) (1,319 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

dirac-research (formerly just called "Dirac") are open and royalty-free software implementations (video codecs) of Dirac. Dirac format aims to provide high-quality
Fermi–Dirac statistics (2,502 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In quantum statistics, a branch of physics, Fermi–Dirac statistics describes a distribution of particles over energy states in systems consisting of many
Paul Dirac (5,267 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Dirac" redirects here. For other uses, see Dirac (disambiguation). Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac OM FRS (/dɪˈræk/ di-RAK; 8 August 1902 – 20 October 1984)
Dirac Prize (795 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Dirac Prize is the name of four prominent awards in the field of theoretical physics, computational chemistry, and mathematics, awarded by different
Dirac equation (5,015 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In particle physics, the Dirac equation is a relativistic wave equation derived by British physicist Paul Dirac in 1928. In its free form, or including
Dirac measure (550 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dirac measure assigns a size to a set based solely on whether it contains a fixed point x or not. It is one way of formalizing the idea of the Dirac delta
Feynman slash notation (191 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
study of Dirac fields in quantum field theory, Richard Feynman invented the convenient Feynman slash notation (less commonly known as the Dirac slash notation)
Incomplete Fermi–Dirac integral (32 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
incomplete Fermi–Dirac integral for an index j is given by This is an alternate definition of the incomplete polylogarithm. Complete Fermi–Dirac integral
Fermi–Dirac integral (14 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fermi–Dirac integral may refer to: Complete Fermi–Dirac integral Incomplete Fermi–Dirac integral
Kapitsa–Dirac effect (362 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Kapitsa–Dirac effect is a quantum mechanical effect consisting of the diffraction of electrons by a standing wave of light. The effect was first predicted
Dirac spinor (1,009 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In quantum field theory, the Dirac spinor is the bispinor in the plane-wave solution of the free Dirac equation, where (in the units ) is a relativistic
Complete Fermi–Dirac integral (85 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In mathematics, the complete Fermi–Dirac integral, named after Enrico Fermi and Paul Dirac, for an index j  is given by This equals where is the polylogarithm
Dirac fermion (95 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
physics, a Dirac fermion is a fermion which is not its own antiparticle. It is named for Paul Dirac. They can be modelled with the Dirac equation. The
Dirac delta function (8,125 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
uses, see Delta function (disambiguation). In mathematics, the Dirac delta function, or δ function, is a generalized function, or distribution
Gabriel Andrew Dirac (191 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gabriel Andrew Dirac (March 13, 1925 – July 20, 1984) was a mathematician who mainly worked in graph theory. He stated a sufficient condition for a graph
Dirac operator (567 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In mathematics and quantum mechanics, a Dirac operator is a differential operator that is a formal square root, or half-iterate, of a second-order operator
Dirac algebra (361 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the Dirac algebra is the Clifford algebra Cℓ1,3(C). This was introduced by the mathematical physicist P. A. M. Dirac in 1928 in developing the Dirac equation
Dirac equation in the algebra of physical space (540 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Dirac equation, as the relativistic equation that describes spin 1/2 particles in quantum mechanics can be written in terms of the Algebra of physical
Dirac comb (877 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In mathematics, a Dirac comb (also known as an impulse train and sampling function in electrical engineering) is a periodic tempered distribution constructed
Dirac, Charente (46 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For other uses, see Dirac (disambiguation). Dirac is a commune in the Charente department in the Poitou-Charentes region in southwestern France. Communes
Dirac sea (1,574 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Dirac sea is a theoretical model of the vacuum as an infinite sea of particles with negative energy. It was first postulated by the British physicist
Gamma matrices (2,859 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In mathematical physics, the gamma matrices, , also known as the Dirac matrices, are a set of conventional matrices with specific anticommutation relations
Fermionic field (944 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of a fermionic field is the Dirac field, which describes fermions with spin-1/2: electrons, protons, quarks, etc. The Dirac field can be described as either
Dirac string (341 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
physics, a Dirac string is a hypothetical one-dimensional curve in space, conceived of by the physicist Paul Dirac, stretching between two Dirac magnetic
Dirac adjoint (329 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In quantum field theory, the Dirac adjoint defines the dual operation of a Dirac spinor. The Dirac adjoint is motivated by the need to form well-behaved
Dirac–von Neumann axioms (365 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dirac–von Neumann axioms give a mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics in terms of operators on a Hilbert space. They were introduced by Dirac (1930)
Dirac spectrum (97 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In mathematics, a Dirac spectrum, named after Paul Dirac, is the spectrum of eigenvalues of a Dirac operator on a Riemannian manifold with a spin structure
Dirac equation in curved spacetime (247 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
curved spacetime In mathematical physics, the Dirac equation in curved spacetime generalizes the original Dirac equation to curved space. It can be written
List of things named after Paul Dirac (101 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac. Dirac notation Dirac bracket Dirac adjoint Dirac field Dirac Lagrangian Dirac matrices Dirac sea Dirac constant, see reduced
Fermi–Dirac (27 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Fermi–Dirac may refer to: Fermi–Dirac statistics or Fermi–Dirac distribution Fermi–Dirac integral: Complete Fermi–Dirac integral Incomplete Fermi–Dirac integral
Dirac large numbers hypothesis (2,176 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Dirac large numbers hypothesis (LNH) is an observation made by Paul Dirac in 1937 relating ratios of size scales in the Universe to that of force
Abraham–Lorentz force (1,704 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of light. Its relativistic generalization is called the "Abraham–Lorentz–Dirac force". Both of these are in the domain of classical physics, not quantum
The Principles of Quantum Mechanics (350 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
monograph on quantum mechanics written by Paul Dirac and first published by Oxford University Press in 1930. Dirac gives an account of quantum mechanics by
Kronecker delta (1,271 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Not to be confused with the Dirac delta function, nor with the Kronecker symbol. In mathematics, the Kronecker delta or Kronecker's delta, named after
Pauli equation (567 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
external electromagnetic field. It is the non-relativistic limit of the Dirac equation and can be used where particles are moving at speeds much less
Clifford analysis (2,303 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
is the study of Dirac operators, and Dirac type operators in analysis and geometry, together with their applications. Examples of Dirac type operators
Fermion (978 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
a fermion (a name coined by Paul Dirac from the surname of Enrico Fermi) is any particle characterized by Fermi–Dirac statistics. These particles obey
The Strangest Man (457 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Strangest Man: The Hidden Life of Paul Dirac, Quantum Genius is a 2009 biography of quantum physicist Paul Dirac written by British physicist and author
Dirac hole theory (175 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dirac hole theory is a theory in quantum mechanics, named after English theoretical physicist Paul Dirac. The theory poses that the continuum of negative
Bra–ket notation (3,837 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the ket /kɛt/. The notation was introduced in 1939 by Paul Dirac and is also known as Dirac notation, though the notation has precursors in Grassmann's
Interaction picture (904 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
In quantum mechanics, the interaction picture (also known as the Dirac picture) is an intermediate representation between the Schrödinger picture and
Nonlinear Dirac equation (712 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
notation. In quantum field theory, the nonlinear Dirac equation is a model of self-interacting Dirac fermions. This model is widely considered in quantum
Two-body Dirac equations (3,904 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
subfields of quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics, the two-body Dirac equations (TBDE) of constraint dynamics provide a three-dimensional yet
Einstein–Maxwell–Dirac equations (691 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Einstein–Maxwell–Dirac equations (EMD) are related to quantum field theory. The current Big Bang Model is a quantum field theory in a curved spacetime
Electron magnetic moment (1,830 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
from the Dirac equation, a fundamental equation connecting the electron's spin with its electromagnetic properties. Reduction of the Dirac equation for
Magnetic monopole (8,960 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
magnetic charge started with a paper by the physicist Paul A.M. Dirac in 1931. In this paper, Dirac showed that if any magnetic monopoles exist in the universe
Helical Dirac fermion (67 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A Helical Dirac fermion is a charge carrier that behaves as a massless relativistic particle with its intrinsic spin locked to its translational momentum
Dirac bracket (3,139 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Dirac bracket is a generalization of the Poisson bracket developed by Paul Dirac to treat classical systems with second class constraints in Hamiltonian