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searching for Conaire (saint) 45 found (200 total)

alternate case: conaire (saint)

Conaire Cóem (226 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Conaire Cóem ("the beautiful"), son of Mug Láma, son of Coirpre Crou-Chend, son of Coirpre Firmaora, son of Conaire Mór, was, according to medieval Irish
Conaire Mór (864 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Conaire Mór (the great), son of Eterscél, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland. His mother was Mess
Pádraic Ó Conaire (616 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pádraic Ó Conaire (28 February 1882 – 6 October 1928) was an Irish writer and journalist whose production was primarily in the Irish language. In his
Síl Conairi (731 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(Sil Chonairi, Conaire) or "Seed of Conaire" were those Érainn septs of the legendary Clanna Dedad descended from the monarch Conaire Mór, son of Eterscél
Achonry (113 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Achonry (/æˈkɔːnriː/; Irish: Achadh Conaire, meaning "Conaire's field") is a village in County Sligo, Ireland. The old name is Achad Cain Conairi. St
Múscraige (504 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
important Érainn people of Munster, descending from Cairpre Músc, son of Conaire Cóem, a High King of Ireland. Closely related were the Corcu Duibne, Corcu
Íar mac Dedad (273 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Eterscél Mór, and grandfather (or great-grandfather) of the famous Conaire Mór, both High Kings of Ireland. Íar may be the eponymous ancestor of the
Corcu Baiscind (508 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
County Clare in Munster. They descended from Cairpre Baschaín, son of Conaire Cóem, a High King of Ireland. Closely related were the Múscraige and Corcu
Deda mac Sin (1,494 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and Eterscél, "great-grandsons" (again) Conaire Mór and Lugaid mac Con Roí, and more distant descendant Conaire Cóem. A third son was Conganchnes mac Dedad
Lugaid Riab nDerg (969 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
he came to power after a five-year interregnum following the death of Conaire Mór (six years according to the Annals of the Four Masters). His foster-father
O'Connor Park (314 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
O'Connor Park (Irish: Páirc Uí Conaire) is a GAA stadium in Tullamore, County Offaly, Ireland. It is one of the principal grounds of the Offaly GAA Gaelic
Corcu Duibne (969 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The tribe belonged to the Érainn and claimed descent from the legendary Conaire Mór, possibly making them distant cousins of such far off kingdoms as Dál
Mess Búachalla (189 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
cow-herder's foundling', in Irish mythology, is the mother of the High King Conaire Mór. Her origins are somewhat confused. In the tale Tochmarc Étaíne she
Mac Cécht (warrior) (938 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
("The Destruction of Da Derga's Hostel") as the bodyguard of the High King Conaire Mor along with the Ulster hero Conall Cernach. In this tale he is called
Dáire mac Dedad (295 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Íar mac Dedad, ancestor of Eterscél Mór, father of the legendary monarch Conaire Mór. T. F. O'Rahilly did not see Dáire as distinct from his son, stating
Dáire (747 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
sometimes referred to as... Daire Dornmár, a grandson of the legendary Conaire Mór and early king of Dál Riata Daire Drechlethan, a King of Tara of uncertain
Togail Bruidne Dá Derga (1,384 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and Middle Irish recensions. It recounts the birth, life, and death of Conaire Mór son of Eterscél Mór, a legendary High King of Ireland, who is killed
Nuadu Necht (292 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
ruled for six months, at the end of which he was killed by Eterscél's son Conaire Mór. The Lebor Gabála Érenn synchronises his reign with that of the Roman
Conn of the Hundred Battles (1,664 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
father, Mug Neit son of Deirgtine, had expelled the kings of Munster, Conaire Coem and Mac Niad mac Lugdach. The two kings fled to Conn, and married
Erc of Dalriada (346 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
of Eochaid Antoit, son of Fiacha Cathmail, son of Cairbre Riata, son of Conaire Cóem and Saraid ingen Chuinn. Suggestions that he was identical with Muiredach
Ulster Cycle (2,807 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hostel"De Shíl Chonairi Móir "On the Descendants of Conaire Mór" De Maccaib Conaire "On the sons of Conaire (Mór)" Cath 'Battle' Cath Airtig "The Battle of
Gaelic revival (1,690 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Peadar Ua Laoghaire, Patrick Pearse (Pádraig Mac Piarais) and Pádraic Ó Conaire. Early pioneers of Irish scholarship were John O'Donovan, Eugene O'Curry
Art mac Cuinn (607 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
brother-in-law Conaire Cóem, was killed by Nemed, son of Sroibcenn, in the battle of Gruitine. He ruled for twenty or thirty years. During his reign Conaire's sons
Fíatach Finn (245 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Finn mac Dáire was also a cousin of the legendary Cú Roí mac Dáire and Conaire Mór of the Érainn and Dáirine (Clanna Dedad). The Dál Fiatach are said
Deoraíocht (126 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Deoraíocht is a novel in Irish from Pádraic Ó Conaire. Published in 1910 it is arguably - Peadar Ó Laoghaire's Séadna also being a contender for the position
Roman Catholic Diocese of Achonry (438 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Roman Catholic Diocese of Achonry (Irish: Deoise Achadh Conaire) is a Roman Catholic diocese in the western part of Ireland. It is one of the five
List of Galway people (300 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Jane Noone, actress Gideon Ouseley Brendan O'Brien, cricketer Pádraic Ó Conaire, Irish language author Éamon Ó Cuív, Fianna Fáil politician Liam O'Flaherty
Eterscél Mór (370 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
skylight in the form of a bird, and she has his child, the future High King Conaire Mór, who is brought up as Eterscél's son. Eterscél ruled for five or six
Senchus fer n-Alban (804 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Riata to the Síl Conairi and Cairpre Riata (Rígfhota), son of Conaire Mór and/or Conaire Cóem, who may be the Reuda of Bede's Historia ecclesiastica gentis
Sadb ingen Chuinn (247 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
mac Cuinn, also a High King of Ireland, while her sister Sáruit married Conaire Cóem of the Érainn, who was High King before him. The traditions vary.
Diocese of Achonry (28 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Diocese of Achonry (Irish: Deoise Achadh Conaire) may refer to: Roman Catholic Diocese of Achonry Diocese of Tuam, Killala and Achonry (Church of
F. R. Higgins (817 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Father and Son." He wrote a moving elegy for his fellow poet Pádraic Ó Conaire. He was generally acknowledged to be a fine poet, but was less successful
Masal Bugduv (420 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ó Conaire about a dishonest salesman who seeks an exaggerated price for a lazy donkey. John Burns of The Sunday Times suggested that the Ó Conaire story
Fedlimid Rechtmar (276 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Achtan   Macnia mac Lugdach   Saruit   Ailill Aulom   Sadb   Conaire Cóem                                  
Darini (674 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dedad take their name from his grandfather, Deda mac Sin. The legendary Conaire Mór, ancestor of the Síl Conairi, or Dál Riata, Múscraige, Corco Duibne
Mac Con (569 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
killed the former High King Conaire Cóem in the battle of Gruitine. During the reign of the High King Art mac Cuinn, Conaire's sons defeated and killed
Mícheál Ó Cléirigh (923 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
mother was Onóra Ultach. Of his older brothers were Uilliam, Conaire and Maolmhuire, Conaire is known to have worked on the annals as a scribe, while Maolmhuire
Eochu Airem (798 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
marries Eochu's successor Eterscél and becomes the mother of the High King Conaire Mór (in Togail Bruidne Dá Derga she is named as Mess Búachalla and is the
Bishop of Achonry (554 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Bishop of Achonry (Irish: Easpag Achadh Conaire) is an episcopal title which takes its name after the village of Achonry in County Sligo, Ireland
Falvey (1,195 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
O’Falvey, Falvey, Fealy and Fealey. The O’Falvey’s trace their descent to Conaire, who was King of Ireland at the beginning of the Christian era. The O’Falvey’s
List of High Kings of Ireland (896 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
BC–1st century AD 70–64 BC 116–111 BC Nuadu Necht 1st century 64–63 BC 111–110 BC Conaire Mór 1st century 63–33 BC 110–40 BC   interregnum (5 years)   interregnum
1928 in Ireland (869 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Grattan Flood, musicologist and historian (born 1857). 6 October - Pádraic Ó Conaire, journalist and writer (born 1882). 26 October - Michael McCarthy, nationalist
Nath Í of Achonry (425 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
instructions of his mentor, he founded a monastery in Achad Cain or Achad Conaire (Achonry) in the district of the Luigne, the land having been granted to
1882 in Ireland (500 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
James Stephens, novelist and poet (died 1950). 28 February - Pádraic Ó Conaire, journalist and writer (died 1928). 17 March - Alfred Byrne, Irish Nationalist
Milesians (Irish) (1,762 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
| | Rossa Conaire Fiacha Ruadh Mor Finnfolaidh