Find link

language:

jump to random article

Find link is a tool written by Edward Betts.

searching for Chief Wahoo 31 found (107 total)

alternate case: chief Wahoo

Publishers Syndicate (898 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

Syndicate. Publishers syndicated such long-lived comic strips as Big Chief Wahoo / Steve Roper, Mary Worth, Kerry Drake, Rex Morgan, M.D., Judge Parker
Allen Saunders (1,757 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
comics genres: editorial, commercial, gag, adventure, and melodrama. Big Chief Wahoo (later renamed Steve Roper and Mike Nomad) was popular in its day, a
Daniel Thompson (poet) (654 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
percussionist Sam Phillips. Featuring the cut, "Tell Chief Wahoo", a commentary against the use of the Chief Wahoo logo by the Cleveland Indians, the "Genetic
Kerhonkson, New York (1,259 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Little League. More recently Indian Valley removed its longtime mascot, Chief Wahoo, from signs, shirts, hats, website, and Facebook for its racial insensitivity
Bill Woggon (537 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in lettering and then drawing the latter's newspaper comic strip Big Chief Wahoo, which later metamorphosed into Steve Roper and Mike Nomad. According
Fran Matera (1,071 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
strip Big Chief Wahoo in 1936, but supporting character Steve Roper edged into the title in 1944, with the dramatic adventure renamed Chief Wahoo and Steve
List of years in comics (1,095 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1936 in comics - debut: Jo, Zette et Jocko, The Phantom, The Clock, Big Chief Wahoo 1937 in comics - debut: Prince Valiant, Sheena, Queen of the Jungle,
2019 Major League Baseball season (12,165 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Will Abandon Chief Wahoo Logo Next Year". The New York Times. Retrieved January 29, 2018. "Cleveland Indians fully phase out Chief Wahoo logo, unveil
Score (television) (835 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
promotions. These territories included the Mid-Atlantic with Ric Flair and Chief Wahoo McDaniel, Memphis with Jerry 'the King' Lawler, Texas with the Von Erichs
Ric Savage (2,084 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
with South Atlantic Pro Wrestling in 1991 in a televised match against Chief Wahoo McDaniel. Savage then trained briefly under the "Russian Bear" Ivan Koloff
Wahoo McDaniel (1,824 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Wahoo! Wahoo!". Sports Illustrated Vault | SI.com. "The Betrayal of Chief Wahoo McDaniel (Part Three)". Retrieved May 17, 2020. "Mid-Atlantic Championship
Mitchell Lewis (1,476 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fight (1939) - Cheating Gambler (uncredited) Idiot's Delight (1939) - Chief Wahoo (uncredited) Let Freedom Ring (1939) - Joe (uncredited) Sergeant Madden
Mad Maxine (1,101 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved 2013-10-05. Ewing, Craig (1985-09-06). "Hold Everything: Windhams, Chief Wahoo, Lady Maxine Are Coming". The Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved 2014-10-27
Ken Patera (2,646 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
returned to the Mid-Atlantic territory as a heel, defeating area legend Chief Wahoo McDaniel for the Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship in April 1978
Eastern Color Printing (2,895 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
out of business. Source: The Amazing Willie Mays (1 issue, 1954) Big Chief Wahoo (7 issues, 1942-1943) Buck Rogers (6 issues, 1940-1943) Buster Crabbe
Tatanka (wrestler) (2,968 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
was honored by retired professional wrestlers Chief Jay Strongbow and Chief Wahoo McDaniel and by Lumbee tribesman Ray Littleturtle on an edition of Raw
Louis Sockalexis (1,508 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Archived from the original on 2007-08-04. Retrieved 2007-07-07. "Before Chief Wahoo". deadspin.com. Retrieved 2007-07-07. "First Cleveland Indian was a Domer
1978 in comics (3,651 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dies at age 94. April 9: Elmer Woggon, American comics artist (Big Chief Wahoo (Steve Roper and Mike Nomad)), dies at age 79. April 29: Louis Zansky
St. John's Red Storm (2,717 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Retrieved May 24, 2010. "A Winning Tradition". stjohns.edu. "The Curse of Chief Wahoo: Enabling Racist Imagery". poynter.org. Archived from the original on
Greg Valentine (5,472 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
with Baron von Raschke in 1978. At the same time, Valentine feuded with Chief Wahoo McDaniel over the NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship. Wahoo had
Charlene Teters (1,111 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
"Redskins", Cincinnati, Ohio Atlanta "Braves", Georgia Cleveland "Indians" Chief "Wahoo", Ohio Florida State University "Seminoles", Florida (have been given
Summer Wesley (1,092 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Daily Kos. Schroeder, Joanna. "Native Americans Call For The End of Chief Wahoo, By Tweeting #DeChief". The Good Men Project. "#ProudToBe". National
St. John's University (New York City) (7,669 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Winning Tradition". Stjohns.edu. Retrieved 25 August 2015. "The Curse of Chief Wahoo: Enabling Racist Imagery". Archived from the original on 3 September
2008 Major League Baseball season (8,054 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1950s and early 1960s without player names on the back, replacing their "Chief Wahoo" vest; The Kansas City Royals added an alternate light blue jersey based
Enfield High School (3,265 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
on mascots found offensive by different minority groups. The mascot "Chief Wahoo", was taken away after complaints from a teacher were received concerning
Death & Destruction (3,434 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Clown, Boris Zhukov, Ivan Koloff, Ricky "The Dragon" Steamboat, and Chief Wahoo McDaniel. A month later, they won the BWF Tag Team Championship after
Mark Curtis Memorial Weekend of Champions (1,354 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
the following night at the Civic Auditorium in Kingsport, Tennessee. "Chief" Wahoo McDaniels was also inducted into the Kingsport Wrestling Hall of Fame
List of newspaper comic strips A–F (4,282 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Donovan (US) Big Ben Bolt (1950–1977) by John Cullen Murphy (US) Big Chief Wahoo (see Steve Roper and Mike Nomad) Big George (1960–1990) by Virgil Partch
Comic strip syndication (5,504 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Syndicate, later to be known for such popular, long-running strips as Big Chief Wahoo / Steve Roper, Mary Worth, Kerry Drake, Rex Morgan, M.D., Judge Parker
List of baseball team nicknames (5,140 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Chief Wahoo's Tribe - Reference to the team's logo, an Indian called "Chief Wahoo". The Wahoos - Same as the previous. The Fighting Braves of the Cuyahoga
List of newspaper comic strips P–Z (4,882 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Caniff (US) Steve Roper and Mike Nomad (1936–2004), first titled Big Chief Wahoo, originally by Allen Saunders and Elmer Woggon (US) Still Life by Jerry