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searching for Cherokee syllabary 20 found (136 total)

alternate case: cherokee syllabary

Cherokee Arboretum at Audubon Acres (122 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article

labeled with scientific, common, and Cherokee names written in the Cherokee Syllabary. Cherokee uses are also described. Cherokee Trail Arboretum (Chattanooga
Jay Red Eagle (174 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and the first ever Cherokee shoes specifically designed using the Cherokee syllabary and language. He is an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation. His
Lake Sequoyah (Mississippi) (81 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
after Sequoyah (1767–1843), an Indian silversmith and inventor of the Cherokee syllabary. U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Lake
Sequoyah Lake (Georgia) (70 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
after Sequoyah (1767–1843), an Indian silversmith and inventor of the Cherokee syllabary. Variant names are "Lake Sequoyah" and "Sequoia Lake". U.S. Geological
Silversmith (812 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Alfredo Sciarrotta Sequoyah, Cherokee silversmith, inventor of the Cherokee syllabary Alice Sheene Robert Welch Edward Winlsow Early American silversmith
1843 in the United States (852 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"American Titian", and poet (born 1779) August – Sequoyah, creator of the Cherokee syllabary (b. c. 1767) August 10 – Robert Adrain, mathematician (born 1775 in
National Hall of Fame for Famous American Indians (407 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Indians inducted into the Hall have been Sequoyah, who created the Cherokee syllabary Charles Curtis, politician and vice-president of the United States
Clinch River (1,489 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of "Pellissippi" is questionable, as there is no "P" sound in the Cherokee syllabary (D. Ray Smith. "View of the Bear Creek Valley". Retrieved July 24
Vonore, Tennessee (1,643 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fort Loudoun, was the birthplace of Sequoyah, creator of the written Cherokee syllabary. Fort Loudoun was a British colonial-era fort built in 1756 in hopes
Cyrus Thomas (1,336 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
mounds"; the evidence being that "the stone represented characters of Cherokee syllabary". Thomas divided the mounds into a northern section, which was divided
1843 (2,505 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1770) August – Sequoyah, Native American silversmith, creator of the Cherokee syllabary (b. c. 1767) July 22 – Marie-Madeleine Lachenais, Haitian de facto
Dwight Presbyterian Mission (884 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
missionary in Georgia before removal. He created the type for the Cherokee syllabary for their first newspaper, the Cherokee Phoenix. In 1837, the first
Calhoun, Georgia (1,938 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
George Gist or George Guess) (c.1767–1843), Cherokee, inventor of the Cherokee Syllabary. This was the only time in recorded history that a member of a non-literate
Fort Payne, Alabama (2,382 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
time it was the home of Sequoyah, a silversmith who invented the Cherokee syllabary, enabling reading and writing in the language. The settlement was
Jesse Bushyhead (1,065 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Genesis and other religious books into the Cherokee language, using the Cherokee Syllabary. He also served as pastor of the Amohee church. Jesse Bushyhead married
Sand Mountain (Alabama) (1,908 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Mountain, and in Wills Valley to the east. Sequoyah, creator of the Cherokee syllabary, lived in the Cherokee village of Wills Town, near present-day Fort
Evan Jones (missionary) (1,526 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Genesis and other religious books into the Cherokee language, using the Cherokee Syllabary. Jones vehemently opposed the removal of the Cherokees from their
Sequoia sempervirens (6,290 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
George Gist, usually spelled Sequoyah, who developed the still-used Cherokee syllabary. The redwood is one of three living species, each in its own genus
Kay WalkingStick (2,827 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Where are the generations? Never born" followed by her name in the Cherokee syllabary In 1995 she was included in art history textbook, H. W. Janson's History
Elias Boudinot (Cherokee) (3,282 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Worcester had new type created and cast for the new forms of the Cherokee syllabary. In 1828, the two printed the Cherokee Phoenix in Cherokee and English