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searching for Black Vaudeville 35 found (40 total)

alternate case: black Vaudeville

Tutt Brothers (665 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article

Tutt, Tutt & Whitney and the Whitney Brothers. They were prominent in black vaudeville and created over 40 revues for black audiences. Salem Tutt Whitney
Jailhouse Blues (206 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
This musical short film features Mamie Smith, who was a top star in Black Vaudeville and a recording artist with Okeh Records, although by the time Jailhouse
George Lederer (219 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Marion Cook and lyrics by poet Paul Dunbar. It starred the prominent black vaudeville team of Bert Williams and George Walker. Then crossing the Atlantic
S. H. Dudley (singer) (703 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
recording artist, and music business executive. He was unrelated to the black vaudeville performer and impresario Sherman Houston Dudley. He was born in Greencastle
DeForest Covan (55 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
1917-September 8, 2007) was an American actor, dancer, and former black vaudeville performer. From his first film appearance in 1936, in The Singing Kid
Hazel Meyers (398 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
female blues and country blues singer. She spent most of her career in black vaudeville, but on recordings she was billed as a blues artist. Her more famous
Virginia Liston (548 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
classic female blues and jazz singer. She spent most of her career in black vaudeville. Liston recorded "You Can Dip Your Bread in My Gravy, but You Can't
Lillian Glinn (400 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
country blues singer and songwriter. She spent most of her career in black vaudeville. Among her popular recordings were "Black Man Blues," "Doggin' Me Blues"
Edna Hicks (232 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
believed to have moved north in her mid-teens. She was popular in black vaudeville in the American Midwest in the late 1910s and 1920s, appeared often
Classic female blues (1,603 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
themselves on guitar or piano. The effect of the Great Depression on black vaudeville and the recording industry and also the trend toward swing music in
Theatre Owners Booking Association (1,026 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
  American Vaudeville Museum pages on T.O.B.A. Thomas Fleming on Black vaudeville and T.O.B.A. in Jacksonville, Fla. New York Times review of the play
Daisy Martin (405 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
blues style. She toured the eastern and midwestern United States in black vaudeville in the 1910s and early 1920s. In 1914 she appeared in the revue My
Stump and Stumpy (340 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hartman, traveled around the United States on what was often called the 'Black Vaudeville' circuit, under management of Nat Nazarro. In 1943, Cross was cast
Vaudeville (4,498 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
as did speakers of Italian and Yiddish. (For a brief discussion of Black vaudeville, see Theater Owners Booking Association.) This foreign addition combined
Carolina Chocolate Drops (924 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Alliance for their work in Keep a Song in Your Soul: The Roots of Black Vaudeville. Staged by the Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago, written by
Aileen Stanley (774 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
handling of blues material was similar to that of some of the northern black vaudeville singers of the time. Her stage appearances billed her as "The Phonograph
Harold Nicholas (887 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
three, his older brother Fayard enjoyed sitting in the audience of the black vaudeville theater where his parents performed, enraptured by the great performers
Morton Theatre (462 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Division, Georgia: 4-5. Retrieved August 23, 2016.  Riis, Thomas L., Black Vaudeville, The TOBA, and the Morton Theatre: Recovering the History 1910-1930
Douglass Theatre (286 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Macon, GA". Douglasstheatre.org. Retrieved 2008-11-20.  "The Blues, Black Vaudeville, and the Silver Screen, 1912-1930s: Selections from the Records of
Ethel Waters (2,465 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
the stage. After her start in Baltimore, Waters toured on the black vaudeville circuit. As she described it later, "I used to work from nine until
Hart Wand (399 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
a few months later by "Bably Seal Blues", a negligible item by the black vaudeville performer Arthur"Baby" Seals and ragtime pianist Arthur Matthews."
Open the Door, Richard (1,555 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
runaway pop sensation. "Open the Door, Richard" started out as a black vaudeville routine. Pigmeat Markham, one of several who performed the routine
Vernel Bagneris (1,400 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
one-night-only production of One Mo’ Time, a musical he had written based on black vaudeville performers in New Orleans. Their limited run show quickly turned into
Sherman H. Dudley (1,052 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Enterprises, and began buying and leasing theaters to develop the first black vaudeville circuit, initially around Washington and Virginia; he had bought his
Earl Palmer (1,964 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
career at five as a tap dancer, joining his mother and aunt on the black vaudeville circuit in its twilight and touring the country extensively with Ida
Aida Overton Walker (661 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
collaborations with Bert Williams and her husband George Walker, the major black vaudeville and musical comedy powerhouses of the era. She first gained national
Josephine Baker (6,366 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the marriage lasted less than a year and she left Wells to join a Black Vaudeville group. In Baker’s teen years she struggled to have a healthy relationship
Dallas Blues (826 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
a few months later by 'Baby Seal Blues', a negligible item by the black vaudeville performer Arthur 'Baby' Seals and ragtime pianist Arthur Matthews."
Billy Pierce (choreographer) (820 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Medicine Show on the Theater Owners Booking Association circuit of black vaudeville theaters, which took him to New York City. In Gotham, he re-entered
Henry "Crip" Heard (704 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
was an African-American professional dancer who appeared mostly in black vaudeville theaters and nightclubs during the late 1940s and 50s. What distinguished
Minstrel show (10,686 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1869-1911) capitalized on this and created the first totally Black-owned Black Vaudeville Show, The Rabbit's Foot Comedy Company, with an all-black cast of great
Blackface (12,697 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
star. In the Theater Owners Booking Association (TOBA), an all-black vaudeville circuit organized in 1909, blackface acts were a popular staple. Called
Kip Rhinelander (2,822 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Selections from the Records of Macon's Douglass Theatre, The Blues, Black Vaudeville, and the Silver Screen, 1912-1930s, Digital Library of Georgia Heidi
The Foster Photoplay Company (2,900 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
both trusted adviser and business manager, making a point to book black vaudeville acts. Continuing his efforts to further the success of black performers
Timeline of music in the United States (1880–1919) (14,179 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
Grand Theatre, is an early use of the word jazz and is used by "more black vaudeville acts than any other song ever published". The Navy shuts down Storyville