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searching for Bahamian English 8 found (23 total)

alternate case: bahamian English

David Barnhart (429 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

Letters and sounds (c. 1980) by Reason A. Goodwin, the Dictionary of Bahamian English (c. 1982) by John A. Holm with Alison Watt Shilling, and in 1987 The
Bahamas–Turkey relations (588 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Doubleday, 1974. Holm, John A., and Alison Watt Shilling. Dictionary of Bahamian English. Cold Spring, New York: Lexik House, 1982. Johnson, Doris. The Quiet
Black Bermudians (712 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
groups African people • African Americans • Afro-Caribbean • Afro-Bahamian • English people a Ancestral Diaspora b Estimated aboriginal population All
Conch (people) (786 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
2018. Holm, John A.; Shilling, Allison Watt (1982). Dictionary of Bahamian English. Cold Spring, New York: Lexik House. pp. 49. ISBN 978-0-936368-03-0
Culture of the Caribbean (3,436 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
greens with okra. For example: Childs, Becky; Wolfram, Walt (2008). "Bahamian English: phonology". In Schneider, Edgar W. (ed.). The Americas and the Caribbean
Caribbean Community (3,532 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Anguillian English Creole Arabic Bajan English Bajan English Creole Bahamian English Creole Belizean English Creole Belizean Spanish Caribbean Hindustani
Haplogroup T-M184 (18,929 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
3% Colombians Colombian Spanish (Romance) Huila 3/42 7.1% Bahamians Bahamian English (West Germanic) Long Island 3/43 7% Panamanians Castilian (Romance
Staniel Cay (2,467 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cays. A blend of African, English, and island dialects makes up the Bahamian English language. The idiom on the island was influenced by the African slaves