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Longer titles found: Pacific Coast Athabaskan languages (view), Southern Athabaskan languages (view), Northern Athabaskan languages (view), Bible translations into Athabaskan languages (view)

searching for Athabaskan languages 16 found (157 total)

alternate case: athabaskan languages

Missinipi Broadcasting Corporation (901 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article

Missinipi Broadcasting Corporation, or MBC Radio, is a radio network in Canada, serving First Nations and Métis communities in the province of Saskatchewan
Consonant harmony (1,297 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
-anterior class (sh-like sounds). Such patterns are found in the Dene (Athabaskan) languages such as Navajo (Young and Morgan 1987, McDonough 2003), Tahltan
CIAM-FM (594 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
CIAM-FM is a community Christian radio station broadcasting at 92.7 MHz on the FM dial in Fort Vermilion, Alberta, Canada. CIAM-FM is a listener supported
Stony River, Alaska (628 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
multilingualism in Stony River village between Yu'pik and three distinct Athabaskan languages. The Stony River CDP is located at 61°47′15″N 156°35′28″W / 61
Ron Scollon (544 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the development of lexicons and educational materials for several Athabaskan languages in interior Alaska. He also taught in the education program, where
Alaska Native Language Archive (278 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
reification of indigenous language boundaries in Alaska. Working Papers in Athabaskan Languages, ed. by S. Tuttle & J. Spence, 75-87. (Alaska Native Language Center
Minto, Alaska (1,081 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The traditional language of Minto is Lower Tanana, one of eleven Athabaskan languages spoken in Alaska. As of 2010, "Speakers who grew up with Lower Tanana
John Bengtson (714 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
(Karasuk) Hypothesis; Part 4: Burusho–Dene. In Working Papers in Athabaskan Languages (Alaska Native Language Center Working Papers No. 8), ed. by Siri
Cahto (2,074 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Casino, located in Laytonville. The Kato language is one of four Athabaskan languages that were spoken in northwestern California. The others were Eel
Robert McDonald (missionary) (756 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
translation work helped unify the various tribes speaking similar Athabaskan languages. In 1911, McDonald published a dictionary and grammar for the language
Alexander Mackenzie (explorer) (1,909 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article
language". In Holt, Gary; Tuttle, Siri (eds.). Working Papers in Athabaskan Languages. Working Papers #4. Fairbanks, Alaska: Alaska Native Language Center
Navajo grammar (3,992 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
"(a round object) moves independently". Like most Athabaskan languages, Southern Athabaskan languages show various levels of animacy in its grammar, with
Pliny Earle Goddard (1,783 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fang-Kuei, a native speaker of Mandarin, to hear two other California Athabaskan languages, and to observe their complete lack of tonal contrasts. Goddard apparently
Linguistic relativity (10,037 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
spheres. There are many excellent examples in Aboriginal America. The Athabaskan languages form as clearly unified, as structurally specialized, a group as
Navajo phonology (4,989 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
aspirated and ejective stops is twice as long as that found in most non-Athabaskan languages. Young & Morgan (1987) described Navajo consonants as "doubled" between
Edward Sapir (5,556 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
other. Sapir's special focus among American languages was in the Athabaskan languages, a family which especially fascinated him. In a private letter, he