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searching for Aegineta 18 found (24 total)

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Paul of Aegina (740 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Paul of Aegina or Paulus Aegineta (Greek: Παῦλος Αἰγινήτης; Aegina, c. 625 – c. 690) was a 7th-century Byzantine Greek physician best known for writing
Serapion of Alexandria (206 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
several times mentioned by Celsus, Galen, Caelius Aurelianus, Aëtius, Paulus Aegineta, and Nicolaus Myrepsus. Galen, Introd. c. 4. col. xiv. Celsus, De Med
Ammonius Lithotomos (383 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
operation has ever since borne his name—the Celsian method. From Paulus Aegineta: "To stop bleeding, Oribasius directs, in the first place, cooling and
Soranus of Ephesus (803 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
soul into seven parts, and denied its immortality. He is quoted by Paulus Aegineta, as being one of the earliest Greek medical writers who had described the
Pediatrics (1,456 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
physicians Oribasius, Aëtius of Amida, Alexander Trallianus, and Paulus Aegineta contributed to the field. The Byzantines also built brephotrophia (crêches)
Cyperus rotundus (1,578 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and Islamic herbalists including Dioscorides, Galen, Serapion, Paulus Aegineta, Avicenna, Rhazes, and Charles Alston have described medical uses as stomachic
Oleria (220 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
[1855]) Oleria zelica (Hewitson, 1856) The "ollantaya" species-group: Oleria aegineta (Hewitson, 1869) Oleria baizana (Haensch, 1903) Oleria, funet.fi
Medical Compendium in Seven Books (791 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
treatise written in Greek the 7th century CE by Paul of Aegina a.k.a. Paulus Aegineta. The title in Greek is Epitomes iatrikes biblio hepta. The work is chiefly
Clinical lycanthropy (1,481 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
condition go back to the second century, when the Alexandrian physician Paulus Aegineta attributed lycanthropy to melancholy or an "excess of black bile". In 1563
Tonsillectomy (3,879 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
this way, give rise to serious Hæmorrhage". In the 7th century Paulus Aegineta (625–690) described a detailed procedure for tonsillectomy, including dealing
Cubeb (3,108 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
U.S. Patent 6,214,788 Adams, E. (1847), The Seven Books of Paulus Aegineta, translated from Greek, Vol.3, London: The Sydenham Society . Cordier,
Lithotomy (1,146 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
descriptions of bladder stone treatment using perineal lithotomy. Paulus Aegineta 7th-century Byzantine Greek physician his Medical Compendium in Seven Books
Garlic (6,032 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
eulogizes it as the "rustic's theriac" (cure-all) (see F. Adams' Paulus Aegineta, p. 99), and Alexander Neckam, a writer of the 12th century (see Wright's
List of ancient Western doctors (444 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Oribasius (4th century) Ovid (1st century AD) Palladius (physician) Paulus Aegineta (7th century) Phasias of Tenedos Philagrius of Epirus (3rd-4th century)
Culture of Greece (8,506 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and the Middle East for centuries. The physicians Herophilos and Paulus Aegineta were pioneers in the study of anatomy, while Pedanius Dioscorides wrote
Pluto (mythology) (17,024 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
17 (1898), vol. 36, p. 428. Francis Adams, The Seven Books of Paulus Aegineta (London, 1847), p. 270; Dalby, Food in the Ancient World, p. 105; Nouveau
Joannes Actuarius (993 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
though he chiefly follows Galen, and very often Aëtius Amidenus and Paulus Aegineta without naming him, yet he makes use of whatever he finds to his purpose
Editio princeps (10,512 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sabio Venice Simplicius, Commentarius in Enchiridion Epicteti 1528 Paulus Aegineta Aldine Press Venice 1530 Polybius Johannes Secerius Hagenau A part of