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Longer titles found: 4th century BC (view), 4th century BC in poetry (view), 4th century in Roman Britain (view), 4th century in architecture (view), 4th century in poetry (view), Christianity in the 4th century (view), List of political entities in the 4th century BC (view), List of political entities in the 4th century (view), List of state leaders in the 4th century (view)

searching for 4th century 519 found (14274 total)

Euclid (2,382 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

Euclid Born Mid-4th century BC Died Mid-3rd century BC Known for Euclidean geometry Euclid's Elements Euclidean algorithm List of topics named after Euclid
Hypatia (10,784 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hypatia (born c. 350–370; died 415 AD) was a Hellenistic Neoplatonist philosopher, astronomer, and mathematician, who lived in Alexandria, Egypt, then
Darius III (1,984 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Darius III (c. 380 – July 330 BC), originally named Artashata and called Codomannus by the Greeks, was the last king of the Achaemenid Empire of Persia
Ambrose (6,389 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
theologian, and one of the most influential ecclesiastical figures of the 4th century. Ambrose was serving as the Roman governor of Aemilia-Liguria in Milan
Alexander IV of Macedon (909 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander IV (Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος Δ΄; 323 – 309 BC), erroneously called sometimes in modern times Aegus, was the son of Alexander the Great (Alexander III
Philip II of Macedon (4,007 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Philip II of Macedon (Greek: Φίλιππος Β΄ ὁ Μακεδών; 382–336 BC) was the king (basileus) of the kingdom of Macedon from 359 BC until his assassination in
Ptolemaic dynasty (1,540 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Ptolemaic dynasty (/ˌtɒlɪˈmeɪɪk/; Ancient Greek: Πτολεμαῖοι, Ptolemaioi), sometimes also known as the Lagids (/ˈlædʒɪdz/) or Lagidae (/ˈlædʒɪdi/; Λαγίδαι
Gregory of Nazianzus (4,722 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
390), also known as Gregory the Theologian or Gregory Nazianzen, was a 4th-century Archbishop of Constantinople, and theologian. He is widely considered
Ptolemy I Soter (2,787 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ptolemy I Soter (/ˈtɒləmi/; Greek: Πτολεμαῖος Σωτήρ, Ptolemaîos Sōtḗr "Ptolemy the Savior"; c. 367 BC – January 282 BC) was a companion and historian of
Basil of Caesarea (4,909 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Small Asketikon, was transmitted to the west via Rufinus during the last 4th century. As a result of Basil's influence, numerous religious orders in Eastern
Athanasius of Alexandria (8,862 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Athanasius of Alexandria (c. 296–298 – 2 May 373), also called Athanasius the Great, Athanasius the Confessor or, primarily in the Coptic Orthodox Church
Catherine of Alexandria (4,111 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
tradition, a Christian saint and virgin, who was martyred in the early 4th century at the hands of the emperor Maxentius. According to her hagiography,
Hilary of Poitiers (2,516 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was born at Poitiers either at the end of the 3rd or beginning of the 4th century A.D. His parents were pagans of distinction. He received a good pagan
Agnes of Rome (1,381 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Agnes of Rome (c.  291 – c.  304) is a virgin martyr, venerated as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox Church, the Anglican Communion
Pope Miltiades (1,442 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Constantine eventually defeating him in 324. The feast of Miltiades in the 4th century, according to the Martyrologium Hieronymianum, was celebrated on 10 January
Pope Marcellinus (597 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Marcellinus was the bishop of Rome from 30 June 296 to his death in 304. He may have renounced Christianity during Emperor Diocletian's persecution
Western philosophy (9,628 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Christianity) who adopted Plato's thought and Christianized it in the 4th century and whose influence dominated medieval philosophy perhaps up to end of
Gregory of Nyssa (5,968 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
4th-century bishop of Nyssa, Asia Minor
Pope Damasus I (3,280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
plebeian candidates unsettled some episcopal elections. At the same time, 4th-century emperors expected each new pope-elect to be presented to them for approval
Pope Eusebius (281 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Eusebius was the bishop of Rome from 18 April 310 until his death on 17 August 310. Difficulty arose, as in the case of his predecessor, Marcellus
Asanga (1,760 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
med, traditional Chinese: 無著; ; pinyin: Wúzhuó; Romaji: Mujaku) (fl. 4th century C.E.) was "one of the most important spiritual figures" of Mahayana Buddhism
Pope Mark (272 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Mark (Latin: Marcus) was the bishop of Rome from 18 January to his death on 7 October 336. Little is known of Mark's early life. According to the
Pope Julius I (909 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Julius I was the bishop of Rome from 6 February 337 to his death on 12 April 352. He is notable for asserting the authority of the pope over the Arian
Pope Sylvester I (1,214 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sylvester I (also Silvester, died 31 December 335) was the bishop of Rome from 314 until his death. He was the 33rd Pope of the Catholic Church. He filled
Arses of Persia (745 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arses (Old Persian: 𐎠𐎼𐏁𐎣, romanized: Aršaka), also known by his regnal name Artaxerxes IV (/ˌɑːrtəˈzɜːrksiːz/; Old Persian: 𐎠𐎼𐎫𐎧𐏁𐏂𐎠, romanized: Artaxšaçā)
Phi (1,339 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Greek alphabet. In Archaic and Classical Greek (c. 9th century BC to 4th century BC), it represented an aspirated voiceless bilabial plosive ([pʰ]), which
Pope Siricius (881 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Siricius (334 – 26 November 399) was the bishop of Rome from December 384 to his death. In response to inquiries from Bishop Himerius of Tarragona
Philip III of Macedon (1,267 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Philip III Arrhidaeus (Ancient Greek: Φίλιππος Γ΄ ὁ Ἀρριδαῖος; c. 359 BC – 25 December, 317 BC) reigned as king of Macedonia from after 11 June 323 BC
Ephrem the Syrian (2,975 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
4th century Syriac deacon, hymnographer and theologian
Anthony the Great (3,389 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Anthony or Antony the Great (Greek: Ἀντώνιος Antṓnios; Arabic: القديس انطونيوس بادية مصر‎; Latin: Antonius; Coptic: Ⲁⲃⲃⲁ Ⲁⲛⲧⲱⲛⲓ; c. 12 January 251 – 17
Ancient Greece (8,896 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the 5th century, but displaced by Spartan hegemony during the early 4th century BC, before power shifted to Thebes and the Boeotian League and finally
Pope Marcellus I (1,301 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Marcellus I (6 January 255 – 16 January 309) was the bishop of Rome from May or June 308 to his death. He succeeded Marcellinus after a considerable
Jaimini (626 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sutras and Jaimini Sutras, he is estimated to have lived around the 4th-century BCE. His school is considered non-theistic, but one that emphasized rituals
Artaxerxes III (3,280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ochus (Greek: Ὦχος, Ôchos; Babylonian: Ú-ma-kuš), better known by his dynastic name of Artaxerxes III (Old Persian: 𐎠𐎼𐎫𐎧𐏁𐏂 Artaxšaçā) was King of
Cyril of Jerusalem (3,286 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
(2010), p284 Hellemo, Geir. Adventus Domini: Eschatological Thought in 4th Century Apses and Catecheses, BRILL, 1989 ISBN 9789004088368 *"The Penguin Dictionary
Vasubandhu (2,945 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Samudragupta. This information temporally places this Vasubandhu in the 4th century CE. The earliest biography of Vasubandhu was translated into Chinese
Saint Lucy (3,685 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lucia of Syracuse (283–304), also called Saint Lucia (Latin: Sancta Lucia) or Saint Lucy, was a Christian martyr who died during the Diocletianic Persecution
Augustine of Hippo (18,779 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Augustine of Hippo (/ɔːˈɡʌstɪn/; Latin: Aurelius Augustinus Hipponensis; 13 November 354 – 28 August 430), also known as Saint Augustine, was a theologian
Euphemia (890 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Euphemia (Greek: Εὐφημία Late Koine Greek [efiˈmia]), "well-spoken [of]", known as the All-praised in the Orthodox Church, is a Christian saint,
Roman Britain (13,653 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the Britains. A fifth province, Valentia, is attested in the later 4th century. For much of the later period of the Roman occupation, Britannia was
Saint Nino (1,662 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Nina (Georgian: წმინდა ნინო, ts'minda nino; Armenian: Սուրբ Նունե, Surb Nune; Greek: Αγία Νίνα, Agía Nína; sometimes St. Nune or St. Ninny) Equal
John Chrysostom (8,245 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Patristics scholars, opposition to any particular view during the late 4th century was conventionally expressed in a manner, utilizing the rhetorical form
Paul I of Constantinople (974 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paul I or Paulus I or Saint Paul the Confessor (died c. 350), was the sixth bishop of Constantinople, elected first in 337 AD. Paul became involved in
Saint Lucy (3,685 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lucia of Syracuse (283–304), also called Saint Lucia (Latin: Sancta Lucia) or Saint Lucy, was a Christian martyr who died during the Diocletianic Persecution
Cassander (949 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cassander (Greek: Κάσσανδρος Ἀντιπάτρου, Kassandros Antipatrou; "son of Antipatros": c. 355 BC – 297 BC) was king of the ancient kingdom of Macedon from
Thirtieth Dynasty of Egypt (507 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Thirtieth Dynasty of Egypt (notated Dynasty XXX, alternatively 30th Dynasty or Dynasty 30) is usually classified as the fifth Dynasty of the Late Period
Gratian (2,136 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Gratian (/ˈɡreɪʃən/; Latin: Flavius Gratianus; 18 April 359 – 25 August 383) was Roman emperor from 367 to 383. The eldest son of Valentinian I, Gratian
Ammianus Marcellinus (2,466 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ammianus Marcellinus (born c. 330, died c. 391 – 400) was a Roman soldier and historian who wrote the penultimate major historical account surviving from
Tollund Man (1,727 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tollund Man is a naturally mummified corpse of a man who lived during the 4th century BC, during the period characterised in Scandinavia as the Pre-Roman Iron
Twenty-ninth Dynasty of Egypt (335 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Twenty-ninth Dynasty of Egypt (notated Dynasty XXIX, alternatively 29th Dynasty or Dynasty 29) is usually classified as the fourth Dynasty of the Ancient
John Cassian (4,580 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John Cassian (c. AD 360 – c. 435), also known as John the Ascetic and John Cassian the Roman (Latin: Ioannes Eremita Cassianus, Ioannus Cassianus, or Ioannes
Maurya Empire (11,034 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
prefixes "Maurya" to the names Chandragupta and Ashoka. The Puranas (c. 4th century CE or earlier) use Maurya as a dynastic appellation. The Buddhist texts
Basilica (11,006 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
congregational worship throughout the Mediterranean and Europe. From the early 4th century, Christian basilicas, along with their associated catacombs, were used
Victorinus of Pettau (1,152 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Victorinus of Pettau (Poetovio) (died 303 or 304) was an Early Christian ecclesiastical writer who flourished about 270, and who was martyred during
Constans (1,086 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Flavius Julius Constans (c. 320 – 350) was Roman emperor from 337 to 350. He defeated his brother Constantine II in 340, but anger in the army over his
Chariton the Confessor (713 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Chariton the Confessor (Greek: Αγιος Χαρίτων; mid-3rd century, Iconium, Asia Minor - ca. 350, Judaean desert) is a Christian saint. His remembrance
Thirty-first Dynasty of Egypt (1,483 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Thirty-first Dynasty of Egypt (notated Dynasty XXXI, alternatively 31st Dynasty or Dynasty 31), also known as the Second Egyptian Satrapy, was effectively
Magnus Maximus (3,169 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magnus Maximus (Latin: [ˈmaŋnus ˈmaksimus]; Welsh: Macsen Wledig [ˈmaksɛn ˈwlɛdɪɡ]; c. 335–28 August 388) was Roman emperor in the western portion of the
Magadha (2,327 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Chandragupta I (c. 319 – 335/350) Kacha (early 4th century?) Samudragupta (c. 335/350 – 375) Ramagupta (late 4th century?) Chandragupta II (380 – 413/415) Kumaragupta
Martin of Tours (6,878 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sulpicius Severus, who knew him personally. It expresses the immediacy the 4th-century Christian felt with the Devil in all his disguises, and has many accounts
Xenophon (6,362 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Xenophon of Athens (/ˈzɛnəfən, -ˌfɒn/; Greek: Ξενοφῶν, Ancient Greek: [ksenopʰɔ̂ːn], Xenophōn; c. 430 – 354 BC) was an Athenian historian, philosopher
Pope Alexander I of Alexandria (1,988 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander I of Alexandria, 19th Pope and Patriarch of Alexandria. During his patriarchate, he dealt with a number of issues facing the Church in that day
Nicene Creed (5,892 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Nicene Creed (Greek: Σύμβολον τῆς Νικαίας or, τῆς πίστεως, Latin: Symbolum Nicaenum) is a statement of belief widely used in Christian liturgy. It
Artaxerxes II of Persia (2,962 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Artaxerxes II Mnemon /ˌɑːrtəˈzɜːrksiːz/ (Old Persian: 𐎠𐎼𐎫𐎧𐏁𐏂𐎠, lit. 'whose reign is through truth') was the King of Kings of the Achaemenid Empire
Jovian (emperor) (1,899 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Jovian (Latin: Flavius Jovianus; 331 – 17 February 364) was Roman emperor from June 363 to February 364. As part of the imperial bodyguard, he accompanied
Eulalia of Mérida (669 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eulalia of Mérida (Augusta Emerita in 292 - Augusta Emerita 10 December, 304) was a young Roman Christian martyred in Augusta Emerita, the capital of Lusitania
Twenty-eighth Dynasty of Egypt (290 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Twenty-eighth Dynasty of Egypt (notated Dynasty XXVIII, alternatively 28th Dynasty or Dynasty 28) is usually classified as the third dynasty of the
List of ancient Greek philosophers (108 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Name Life School Notes Acrion 5th / 4th century BC Pythagorean visited by Plato Adrastus of Aphrodisias 2nd century AD Peripatetic wrote commentaries
Eutropius (historian) (829 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
translations, including Bird's. Lieu (1998), p. 77. Eutropius, active 4th century. (1993). The breviarium ab urbe condita of Eutropius : the right honourable
Licinius (1,690 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Licinius (Valerius Licinianus Licinius; c. 265 – 325) was Roman emperor from 308 to 324. For most of his reign he was the colleague and rival of Constantine
Philomena (3,197 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Philomena was a young consecrated virgin whose remains were discovered on May 24–25, 1802, in the Catacomb of Priscilla. Three tiles enclosing the
Democritus (4,818 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Democritus (/dɪˈmɒkrɪtəs/; Greek: Δημόκριτος, Dēmókritos, meaning "chosen of the people"; c. 460 – c. 370 BC) was an Ancient Greek pre-Socratic philosopher
Shang Yang (1,643 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shang Yang (Chinese: 商鞅; c. 390 – 338 BCE), also known as Wei Yang (Chinese: 衞鞅) and originally surnamed Gongsun, was an ancient Chinese philosopher, politician
Iamblichus (2,010 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Iamblichus (/aɪˈæmblɪkəs/; Greek: Ἰάμβλιχος; Safaitic: 𐩺𐩣𐩴𐩫 /yamlik/ “[the deity] reigns”; c. AD 245 – c. 325) was a Syrian Neoplatonist philosopher
Alexandria (9,140 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
a 25-ton obelisk. The structure was plundered and demolished in the 4th century when a bishop decreed that Paganism must be eradicated. "Pompey's Pillar"
Scythian archers (810 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Scythian archers were a hypothesized police force of 5th- and early 4th-century BC Athens that is recorded in some Greek artworks and literature. The
List of solar eclipses in antiquity (882 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the 10 longest total eclipses between the 40th century BC and the 4th century. The ten-century period between the 30th and 40th centuries BC is not
Saint George (8,521 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
century. An earlier work by Eusebius, Church history, written in the 4th century, contributed to the legend but did not name George or provide significant
Saint Nicholas (9,231 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
4th-century Christian saint
Nanda Empire (4,515 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dynasty ruled in northern part of the Indian subcontinent during the 4th century BCE, and possibly during the 5th century BCE. The Nandas overthrew the
Lactantius (1,996 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lucius Caecilius Firmianus Lactantius (c. 250 – c. 325) was an early Christian author who became an advisor to the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine
Claudian (1,168 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Claudius Claudianus, usually known in English as Claudian (/ˈklɔːdiən/; c. 370 – c. 404 AD), was a Latin poet associated with the court of the emperor
Yayoi period (2,595 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Yayoi period (弥生時代, Yayoi jidai), started at the beginning of the Neolithic in Japan, continued through the Bronze Age, and towards its end crossed
Ausonius (1,839 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Decimus or Decimius Magnus Ausonius (/ɔːˈsoʊniəs/; c. 310 – c. 395) was a Roman poet and teacher of rhetoric from Burdigala in Aquitaine, modern Bordeaux
Argead dynasty (1,937 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Argead dynasty (Greek: Ἀργεάδαι, Argeádai) was an ancient Macedonian royal house of Dorian Greek provenance. They were the founders and the ruling
Edict of Milan (1,530 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bust of Emperor Constantine I, Roman, 4th century.
Rouran Khaganate (3,364 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
4th century Yujiulü Cheluhui, 4th century Yujiulü Tunugui, 4th century Yujiulü Bati, 4th century Yujiulü Disuyuan, 4th century Yujiulü Pihouba, 4th century
Saint Ursula (2,400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Ursula (Latin for 'little female bear') is a legendary Romano-British Christian saint, died on 21 October 383. Her feast day in the pre-1970 General
Eudoxus of Cnidus (2,437 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
motions centered on a spherical Earth, apparently a novel idea in the 4th century BC. In most modern reconstructions of the Eudoxan model, the Moon is
Yayoi period (2,595 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Yayoi period (弥生時代, Yayoi jidai), started at the beginning of the Neolithic in Japan, continued through the Bronze Age, and towards its end crossed
Arius (7,923 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arius (/əˈraɪəs, ˈɛəri-/; Koinē Greek: Ἄρειος, Áreios; 250 or 256–336) was a Libyan presbyter and ascetic, and priest in Baucalis in Alexandria, Egypt
Catapult (3,293 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
launching aircraft from a ship. The earliest catapults date to at least the 4th century BC with the advent of the mangonel in ancient China, a type of traction
Cappadocian Fathers (881 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Cappadocian Fathers, also traditionally known as the Three Cappadocians, are Basil the Great (330–379), who was bishop of Caesarea; Basil's younger
Saint Monica (1,580 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Monica (c.331/2−387) (AD 322–387) was an early African Christian saint and the mother of St. Augustine of Hippo. She is remembered and honored in
Bosporan Kingdom (2,389 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Hornblower, S.; Ostwald, M. (eds.). The Cambridge Ancient History. VI - The 4th Century BC. Cambridge: CUP. pp. 476–511. Kozlovskaya, Valeriya (10 December 2001)
Plato (17,307 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Plato (/ˈpleɪtoʊ/ PLAY-toe; Greek: Πλάτων Plátōn, pronounced [plá.tɔːn] in Classical Attic; 428/427 or 424/423 – 348/347 BC) was an Athenian philosopher
Valentinian II (1,545 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Valentinian II (Latin: Flavius Valentinianus; 371 – 15 May 392) was Roman emperor from AD 375 to 392. Flavius Valentinianus was born to Emperor Valentinian
Pappus of Alexandria (2,604 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
doubling the cube, polygons and polyhedra. Pappus was active in the 4th century AD. In a period of general stagnation in mathematical studies, he stands
Themistius (1,971 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Themistius (Greek: Θεμίστιος, Themistios; 317, Paphlagonia – c. 390 AD, Constantinople), nicknamed Euphrades, Εὐφραδής (eloquent), was a statesman, rhetorician
Medieval Latin (4,530 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
begin with the rise of early Ecclesiastical Latin in the middle of the 4th century, others around 500, and still others with the replacement of written
Seleucus I Nicator (7,251 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Seleucus I Nicator (/səˈljuːkəs naɪˈkeɪtər/; c. 358 BC – September 281 BC; Ancient Greek: Σέλευκος Νικάτωρ, romanized: Séleukos Nikátōr, lit. 'Seleucus
Theodosius I (5,855 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theodosius I (Greek: Θεοδόσιος, Theodósios; 11 January 347 – 17 January 395), also called Theodosius the Great, was Roman emperor from 379 to 395, during
Constantine the Great (18,169 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
perfectissimus was granted only to mid- or low-level officials by the end of the 4th century. By the new Constantinian arrangement, one could become a senator by
Victor (emperor) (621 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Flavius Victor (unknown – August 388 AD) was a Western Roman emperor from either 383/384 or 387 to August 388. He was the son of the Magister militum per
Eugenius (710 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Flavius Eugenius (died 6 September 394) was a usurper in the western Roman Empire (392–394) against Emperor Theodosius I. He was the last Emperor to support
Pythagoreanism (9,345 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
traditions within Pythagoreanism. The akousmatikoi were superseded in the 4th century BC as a significant mendicant school of philosophy by the Cynics. The
Ancient literature (2,791 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ecclesiazousae, Plutus Hebrew: date of the extant text of the Torah 4th century BCE Sanskrit Ishopanishad Katha Upanishad Prashnopanishad Mundaka Upanishad
Bhadrabahu (811 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ācārya Bhadrabāhu (c. 367 - c. 298 BCE) was, according to the Digambara sect of Jainism, the last Shruta Kevalin (all knowing by hearsay, that is indirectly)
Constantine II (emperor) (657 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Constantine II (Latin: Flavius Claudius Constantinus; February 316 – 340) was Roman emperor from 337 to 340. Son of Constantine the Great and co-emperor
Servian Wall (1,272 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Roman defensive barrier constructed around the city of Rome in the early 4th century BCE. The wall was built of volcanic tuff and was up to 10 m (33 ft) in
Diadochi (3,663 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Paintings of ancient Macedonian soldiers, arms, and armaments, from the tomb of Agios Athanasios, Thessaloniki in Greece, 4th century BCE
Helena (empress) (4,119 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
from a humble background. Bishop Ambrose of Milan, writing in the late 4th century was the first to call her a stabularia, a term translated as "stable-maid"
Antigonid dynasty (405 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Antigonid dynasty (/ænˈtɪɡoʊnɪd/; Greek: Ἀντιγονίδαι) was a dynasty of Hellenistic kings descended from Alexander the Great's general Antigonus I Monophthalmus
Margaret the Virgin (924 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Margaret, known as Margaret of Antioch in the West, and as Saint Marina the Great Martyr (Greek: Ἁγία Μαρίνα) in the East, is celebrated as a saint on
Late Latin (3,307 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Marcellinus (4th century AD), soldier, imperial officer, historian Claudius Claudianus (4th century AD), court poet Gaius Julius Solinus (3rd or 4th century AD)
Late Period of ancient Egypt (902 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Greece. With the Macedonian Greek conquest in the latter half of the 4th century BC, the age of Hellenistic Egypt began. Libyans and Persians alternated
Alexander of Constantinople (829 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander of Constantinople (Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος; c. 237/240 – c. 340) was a bishop of Byzantium and the first Archbishop of Constantinople (the city was
Hilarion (1,086 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
history, and is in any case a record of the state of the human mind in the 4th century. Hilarion was born in Thabatha, south of Gaza in Syria Palaestina of
Eudemus of Rhodes (1,075 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eudemus of Rhodes (Greek: Εὔδημος) was an ancient Greek philosopher, considered the first historian of science, who lived from c. 370 BC until c. 300 BC
Macedonius I of Constantinople (972 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
exist as a distinctive sect. "Macedonius - Greek bishop [flourished 4th century]". britannica.com. Retrieved 15 April 2018. Fuller 1911 harvnb error:
Aelius Donatus (746 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aelius Donatus (English: /doʊˈneɪtəs/; fl. mid-fourth century AD) was a Roman grammarian and teacher of rhetoric. St. Jerome states in Contra Rufinum 1
Festus (historian) (354 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Festus (fl. 4th century), whose name also appears in the manuscripts of his work as Rufus Festus, Ruffus Festus, Sextus Festus, Sextus Rufus, and Sextus
Aurelius Victor (408 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sextus Aurelius Victor Afer (c. 320 – c. 390) was a historian and politician of the Roman Empire. Aurelius Victor was the author of a short history of
Kingdom of Burgundy (1,489 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
verified King of the Burgundians was Gjúki (Gebicca), who lived in the late 4th century. In the course of the Crossing of the Rhine in 406 the Burgundians settled
Papyrus 10 (360 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
manuscript of the Epistle to the Romans, dating paleographically to the early 4th century. The manuscript is a fragment of one leaf, written in one column per
Apostles' Creed (5,239 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and may have been associated with the belief, widely accepted in the 4th century, that, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, each of the Twelve Apostles
Getae (4,426 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
historical narratives about the Getae to the Goths. At the close of the 4th century AD, Claudian, court poet to the emperor Honorius and the patrician Stilicho
Pope Liberius (823 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
4th-century Pope
Arcadius (3,840 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Flavius Arcadius (Greek: Ἀρκάδιος, translit. Arkádios; 1 January 377 – 1 May 408) was Roman emperor from 383 to 408. He was the eldest son of the augustus
List of Graeco-Roman geographers (275 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(3rd century) Tabula Peutingeriana (4th century) Alypius of Antioch (4th century) Marcian of Heraclea (4th century) Expositio totius mundi et gentium (AD
Guilin (2,260 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Guilin (Standard Zhuang: Gveilinz; alternately romanized as Kweilin) is a prefecture-level city in the northeast of China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region
Demetrius of Thessaloniki (1,616 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
'Myrrh-Streamer'; 3rd century – 306) was a Christian martyr of the early 4th century AD. During the Middle Ages, he came to be revered as one of the most
Maxentius (3,210 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maxentius (Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius; c. 276 – 28 October 312) was Roman emperor from 306 to 312. He was the son of former Emperor Maximian and
Greco-Roman mysteries (3,197 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
schools flourished in Late Antiquity; Julian the Apostate in the mid 4th century is known to have been initiated into three distinct mystery schools—most
Metrophanes of Byzantium (222 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Metrophanes (? – 326) was the bishop of Byzantium from 306 to 314. He may have retired from his episcopacy and died as late as 326. There is a tradition
Pachomius the Great (1,360 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pachomius (/pəˈkoʊmiəs/; Greek: Παχώμιος; Coptic: Ⲡⲁϧⲱⲙ; c. 292 – 9 May 348 A.D.), also known as Pachome, Pakhomios, and Pahom, is generally recognized
Temple of Hera, Olympia (1,806 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
approximately 590 BC, but was destroyed by an earthquake in the early 4th century CE. The Heraion at Olympia, located in the north of the sacred precinct
Gupta Empire (6,403 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
subtle exploitation of the shringara (romantic) element in his verse. The 4th century Sanskrit poet Kalidasa credits Chandragupta Vikramaditya with conquering
Demetrius of Thessaloniki (1,616 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
'Myrrh-Streamer'; 3rd century – 306) was a Christian martyr of the early 4th century AD. During the Middle Ages, he came to be revered as one of the most
Eudemus of Rhodes (1,075 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eudemus of Rhodes (Greek: Εὔδημος) was an ancient Greek philosopher, considered the first historian of science, who lived from c. 370 BC until c. 300 BC
Seleucid Empire (4,780 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Seleucid Empire (/sɪˈljuːsɪd/; Ancient Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Σελευκιδῶν, Basileía tōn Seleukidōn) was a Hellenistic state in Western Asia that existed
Antisthenes (2,019 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Antisthenes (/ænˈtɪsθɪniːz/; Greek: Ἀντισθένης; c. 446 – c. 366 BC) was a Greek philosopher and a pupil of Socrates. Antisthenes first learned rhetoric
Metrophanes of Byzantium (222 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Metrophanes (? – 326) was the bishop of Byzantium from 306 to 314. He may have retired from his episcopacy and died as late as 326. There is a tradition
Troyville culture (344 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Troyville culture is an archaeological culture in areas of Louisiana and Arkansas in the Lower Mississippi valley in the Southeastern Woodlands. It
Antipater (1,728 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Antipater (/ænˈtɪpətər/; Ancient Greek: Ἀντίπατρος, romanized: Antipatros, lit. 'like the father'; c. 400 BC – 319 BC) was a Macedonian general and statesman
Papyrus 10 (360 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
manuscript of the Epistle to the Romans, dating paleographically to the early 4th century. The manuscript is a fragment of one leaf, written in one column per
Teos of Egypt (615 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Djedhor, better known as Teos (Ancient Greek: Τέως) or Tachos (Ancient Greek: Τάχως), was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh of the 30th Dynasty. A son of his
Sarmatians (5,713 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
classical antiquity, flourishing from about the 5th century BC to the 4th century AD. Originating in the central parts of the Eurasian Steppe, the Sarmatians
Arsacius of Tarsus (628 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Arsacius (before 324 – November 11, 405) was the intruding archbishop of Constantinople from 404 to 405, after the violent expulsion of John Chrysostom
Pope Timothy I of Alexandria (91 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Timothy I of Alexandria, 22nd Pope of Alexandria & Patriarch of the See of St. Mark, died about July 20, 384. He presided over the second Ecumenical
Appian Way (3,712 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Appian Way (Latin and Italian: Via Appia) is one of the earliest and strategically most important Roman roads of the ancient republic. It connected
Porus (1,871 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
4th century BC King of Paurava
Antipatrid dynasty (99 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Antipatrid dynasty (/ænˈtɪpətrɪd/; Greek: Ἀντιπατρίδαι) was a dynasty of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon founded by Cassander, the son of Antipater
Late Roman army (22,103 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
chaotic 3rd century. Unlike the army of the Principate, the army of the 4th century was heavily dependent on conscription and its soldiers were paid much
Quintus Aurelius Symmachus (1,704 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Quintus Aurelius Symmachus /ˈsɪməkəs/[needs Latin IPA] (c. 345 – 402) was a Roman statesman, orator, and man of letters. He held the offices of governor
Theophrastus (6,189 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theophrastus (/ˌθiːəˈfræstəs/; Greek: Θεόφραστος Theόphrastos; c. 371 – c. 287 BC), a Greek native of Eresos in Lesbos, was the successor to Aristotle
Bahram IV (902 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bahram IV (also spelled Wahram IV or Warahran IV; Middle Persian: 𐭥𐭫𐭧𐭫𐭠𐭭‎), was the Sasanian King of Kings of Iran from 388 to 399. He was the son
Theon of Alexandria (1,401 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theon of Alexandria (/ˌθiːən, -ɒn/; Ancient Greek: Θέων ὁ Ἀλεξανδρεύς; c. AD 335 – c. 405) was a Greek scholar and mathematician who lived in Alexandria
Lysimachus (1,820 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lysimachus (Greek: Λυσίμαχος, Lysimachos; c. 360 BC – 281 BC) was a Macedonian officer and diadochus (i.e. "successor") of Alexander the Great, who became
Isauria (1,126 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
watershed (Zengibar Kalesi). Approx N37° 29′ E32° 12′ near Bozkir. In the 4th century BC, Isauria was the wild district about Isaura Palaea and the heads of
Shapur III (1,836 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Shapur III (Middle Persian: 𐭱𐭧𐭯𐭥𐭧𐭥𐭩‎ Šābuhr), was the Sasanian King of Kings of Iran from 383 to 388. He was the son of Shapur II (r. 309–379) and
Nonius Marcellus (1,281 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Classical Literature, he was probably active in the first half of the 4th century, although some scholars of the 19th and early 20th centuries thought
Ancient Greek art (12,423 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from southern Italy Silver rhyton for the Thracian market, end 4th century 4th century BC Greek gold and bronze rhyton with head of Dionysus, Tamoikin
Peter II of Alexandria (173 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Patriarch Peter II of Alexandria (died 27 February 381) was the 21st Patriarch of Alexandria from 373 to 381 AD. He was a disciple of Saint Athanasius
Perpetual virginity of Mary (3,864 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
were symptoms of original sin, and was affirmed as orthodoxy during the 4th century debates between supporters of virginity on the one hand and Christian
Ezana of Axum (675 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ezana (Ge'ez: ዒዛና ‘Ezana, unvocalized ዐዘነ ‘zn; also spelled Aezana or Aizan) was ruler of the Kingdom of Aksum an ancient kingdom centered in what is now
Kingdom of Iberia (2,725 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
unified medieval Kingdom of Georgia under the Bagrationi dynasty. In the 4th century, after the Christianization of Iberia by Saint Nino during the reign
Martinian (emperor) (528 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Martinian (in full Latin form: Sextus Marcius Martinianus), who died in 325, was Roman Emperor from July to September 18, 324. He had been appointed co-emperor
Maron (1,299 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
(Syriac: ܡܪܘܢ‎, Mārūn; Arabic: مارون‎; Latin: Maron; Greek: Μάρων) was a 4th-century Syriac Christian hermit monk in the Taurus Mountains whose followers
Pope Achillas of Alexandria (209 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Achillas was the 18th Pope and Patriarch of Alexandria, reigning from 312 to 313. He was born in Alexandria, Egypt, and was renowned for his knowledge
Gothic Bible (802 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Gothic Bible or Wulfila Bible is the Christian Bible in the Gothic language spoken by the Eastern Germanic (Gothic) tribes in the early Middle Ages
Epicurus (9,968 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Epicurus (Ancient Greek: Ἐπίκουρος, romanized: Epíkouros; 341–270 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher and sage who founded Epicureanism, a highly influential
Canons of the Apostles (2,084 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Apostolic Canons or Ecclesiastical Canons of the Same Holy Apostles is a 4th-century Syrian Christian text. It is an Ancient Church Order, a collection of
Pyrrhus of Epirus (5,365 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pyrrhus (/ˈpɪrəs/; Ancient Greek: Πύρρος, Pyrrhos; 319/318–272 BC) was a Greek king and statesman of the Hellenistic period. He was king of the Greek tribe
Arch of Galerius and Rotunda (1,954 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
neighbouring early 4th-century AD monuments in the city of Thessaloniki, in the region of Central Macedonia in northern Greece. The 4th-century Roman emperor
Basilica of Junius Bassus (188 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Opus sectile panel: tiger attacking a calf, Roman artwork from the second quarter of the 4th century CE
Amyrtaeus (873 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Amyrtaeus or Amyrtaios (both Hellenizations of the original Egyptian name Amenirdisu) of Sais, is the only pharaoh of the Twenty-eighth Dynasty of Egypt
Olympias (2,031 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Olympias (Ancient Greek: Ὀλυμπιάς, pronounced [olympiás], c. 375–316 BC) was the eldest daughter of king Neoptolemus I of Epirus, the sister of Alexander
Dicaearchus (1,457 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Dicaearchus of Messana (/ˌdɪsiˈɑːrkəs ... mɪˈsænə/; Greek: Δικαίαρχος Dikaiarkhos; c. 350 – c. 285 BC), also written Dicearchus or Dicearch (/ˈdɪsiɑːrk/)
Armalausi (87 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Alamanni and the Marcomanni on the Tabula Peutingeriana (3rd or 4th century). They may have been a tribe of the Hermunduri. Philippus Brietius (1650)
Nectarius of Constantinople (1,169 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius (... – 17 September 397) was the archbishop of Constantinople from AD 381 until his death, the successor to Saint Gregory Nazianzus. Born at
John II, Bishop of Jerusalem (1,436 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
John II (c. 356 – 10 January 417) was bishop of Jerusalem from AD 387 to AD 417. John II succeeded to the episcopal throne of Jerusalem on the death of
Eusebius of Nicomedia (1,309 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eusebius of Nicomedia (died 341) was an Arian priest, the man who baptised Constantine the Great. He was a bishop of Berytus (modern-day Beirut) in Phoenicia
Roxana (911 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Roxana (Ancient Greek: Ῥωξάνη; Old Iranian *Raṷxšnā- “shining, radiant, brilliant”); sometimes Roxanne, Roxanna, Rukhsana, Roxandra and Roxane) was a Sogdian
Nectarius of Constantinople (1,169 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nectarius (... – 17 September 397) was the archbishop of Constantinople from AD 381 until his death, the successor to Saint Gregory Nazianzus. Born at
Devanampiya Tissa of Anuradhapura (975 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Tissa, later Devanampiya Tissa was one of the earliest kings of Sri Lanka based at the ancient capital of Anuradhapura from 247 BC to 207 BC.[citation
Peter I of Alexandria (950 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pope Peter I of Alexandria (Coptic: Ⲡⲁⲡⲁ Ⲁⲃⲃⲁ ⲡⲉⲧⲣⲟⲥ ⲁ̅, ⲡⲓⲁⲅⲓⲟⲥ ⲡⲉⲧⲣⲟⲥ ⲓⲉⲣⲟⲙⲁⲣⲧⲩⲣⲟⲥ ⲡⲓⲁⲣⲭⲏⲉⲣⲉⲩⲥ) was the 17th Pope and Patriarch of Alexandria. He is
Book of Ruth (2,166 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
parable relating to issues around the time of Ezra and Nehemiah (the 4th century BCE). The realistic nature of the story is established from the start
Megasthenes (961 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Megasthenes (/mɪˈɡæsθɪniːz/ mi-GAS-thi-neez; Ancient Greek: Μεγασθένης, c. 350 – c. 290 BC) was an ancient Greek historian, diplomat and Indian ethnographer
Demophilus of Constantinople (587 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Demophilus (Δημόφιλος; died 386) was a bishop of Berea and an archbishop of Constantinople from 370 until he was expelled in 380. Born of good family in
Probus of Byzantium (16 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Probus (died 306) was Bishop of Byzantium from 293 to 306. List of Patriarchs of Constantinople
Cheng Han (349 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cheng Han (simplified Chinese: 成汉; traditional Chinese: 成漢; pinyin: Chénghàn; 303 or 304-347) was a state of the Sixteen Kingdoms during the Jin Dynasty
Adur Narseh (218 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Adur Narseh (Persian: آذرنرسه‎) was the ninth Sasanian King of Kings of Iran briefly in 309. Following his father's death, the nobles and Zoroastrian clergy
Sangam period (2,099 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Sangam period, or Sangam Age (Tamil: சங்ககாலம், Sangakālam ?) or Third Sangam period, is the period of history of ancient Tamil Nadu and Kerala and
Former Yan (453 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Former Yan (Chinese: 前燕; pinyin: Qián Yān; 337-370) was a state of Xianbei ethnicity during the era of Sixteen Kingdoms in China. Initially, Murong
Antigonus I Monophthalmus (3,538 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Antigonus I Monophthalmus (Ancient Greek: Ἀντίγονος ὁ Μονόφθαλμος, romanized: Antigonos ho Monophthalmos, Antigonus the One-eyed, 382 – 301 BC), son of
Vetranio (675 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vetranio (died c. 356) was a Roman soldier, statesman and co-Emperor, a native of the province of Moesia (in modern Serbia). Vetranio was born in the almost
Colossus of Constantine (857 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Colossus of Constantine (Italian: Statua Colossale di Costantino I) was a huge acrolithic statue of the late Roman emperor Constantine the Great (c
Khabash (364 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Khabash, also Khababash or Khabbash, resided at Sais in the fifth nome of Lower Egypt in the fourth century BCE. During the second Persian occupation of
Shaishunaga dynasty (578 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
BCE (Persian conquests) Shaishunaga dynasty Adivasi (tribes) Assaka  4th century BCE (Greek conquests) Nanda empire HISTORICAL AGE Culture Spread of Buddhism
Julian (emperor) (12,096 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Involving Religion, some of which are by Julian relating to Christianity. A 4th century chalcedony portrait of Julian, Saint Petersburg, The State Hermitage
Aristoxenus (2,361 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aristoxenus of Tarentum (Greek: Ἀριστόξενος ὁ Ταραντῖνος; born c. 375, fl. 335 BC) was a Greek Peripatetic philosopher, and a pupil of Aristotle. Most
Praxiteles (2,167 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cephisodotus the Elder, was the most renowned of the Attica sculptors of the 4th century BC. He was the first to sculpt the nude female form in a life-size statue
Prudentius (1,270 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aurelius Prudentius Clemens (/pruːˈdɛnʃiəs, -ʃəs/) was a Roman Christian poet, born in the Roman province of Tarraconensis (now Northern Spain) in 348
Macarius of Egypt (1,799 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Macarius of Egypt (Greek: Ὅσιος Μακάριος ο Ἀιγύπτιος, Osios Makarios o Egyptios; Coptic: ⲁⲃⲃⲁ ⲙⲁⲕⲁⲣⲓ; 300–391) was a Coptic Christian monk and hermit.
Praetorian prefecture of Italy (780 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The praetorian prefecture of Italy (Latin: Praefectura praetorio Italiae, in its full form (until 356) praefectura praetorio Italiae, Illyrici et Africae)
Praetorian prefecture of Illyricum (1,136 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
early administrative history of Illyricum as a prefecture during the 4th century involved its abolition, re-establishment and division several times.
Ezana of Axum (675 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ezana (Ge'ez: ዒዛና ‘Ezana, unvocalized ዐዘነ ‘zn; also spelled Aezana or Aizan) was ruler of the Kingdom of Aksum an ancient kingdom centered in what is now
Paphnutius of Thebes (1,709 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Egypt. Etching from the 16/17th century. Private Collection. Died 4th century AD Venerated in Catholic Church Oriental Orthodoxy Eastern Orthodox Church
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 123 (176 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
papyrus in the form of a sheet. The document was written in the 3rd or 4th century. Currently it is housed in the Egyptian Museum (10014) in Cairo, Egypt
Hormizd II (1,672 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
4th century), governor of southern Arbayistan. Prince Zamasp (??? – 4th century), governor of northern Arbayistan. Prince Shapur Sakanshah (??? – 4th
Saint Elen (564 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Luyddog, lit. "Helen of the Hosts"), often anglicized as Helen, was a late 4th-century founder of churches in Wales. Traditionally, she is said to have been
List of ancient Greek playwrights (616 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Œdipus Achaeus of Syracuse (c. 356 BC) Agathon (c. 448–400 BC) Aphareus (4th century BC) Asklepios** Akhilleus** Tantalos** Sophocles (c. 495-406 BC): Theban
Megalopolis, Greece (952 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Megalopoli (Greek: Μεγαλόπολη) is a town in the southwestern part of the regional unit of Arcadia, southern Greece. It is located in the same site as ancient
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 112 (236 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the form of a sheet. The document was written in the late 3rd or early 4th century. Currently it is housed in the Vaughan Library at the Harrow School in
Praetorian prefect (1,409 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The praetorian prefect (Latin: praefectus praetorio, Greek: ἔπαρχος/ὕπαρχος τῶν πραιτωρίων) was a high office in the Roman Empire. Originating as the commander
Sopater of Apamea (371 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Sopater of Apamea (Greek: Σώπατρος ὁ Ἀπαμεύς; died before 337 AD), was a distinguished sophist and Neoplatonist philosopher. Sopater was a disciple of
Byzantine Senate (1,819 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gerousia) was the continuation of the Roman Senate, established in the 4th century by Constantine I. It survived for centuries, but even with its already
Armalausi (87 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Alamanni and the Marcomanni on the Tabula Peutingeriana (3rd or 4th century). They may have been a tribe of the Hermunduri. Philippus Brietius (1650)
Bessus (810 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bessus, also known by his throne name Artaxerxes V (died summer 329 BC), was a prominent Persian satrap of Bactria in Persia, and later self-proclaimed
Arch of Constantine (4,382 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
frequently cited in surveys of art history, of the stylistic changes of the 4th century, and the "collapse of the classical Greek canon of forms during the late
Tikal (11,558 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Though monumental architecture at the site dates back as far as the 4th century BCE, Tikal reached its apogee during the Classic Period, c. 200 to 900
Paul of Thebes (1,050 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Paul of Thebes, commonly known as Paul, the First Hermit or Paul the Anchorite, or in Egyptian Arabic as Anba Bola, Coptic: Ⲁⲃⲃⲁ Ⲡⲁⲩⲗⲉ; (c. 226/27 – c
Marksville culture (696 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Marksville culture was an archaeological culture in the lower Lower Mississippi valley, Yazoo valley, and Tensas valley areas of present-day Louisiana
Mayurasharma (1,036 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Havyaka Brahmins claim descent from these early Brahmin settlers of the 4th century called the Ahichatra brahmins or the Ahikaru/Havikaru. Mayurasharma was
List of Roman legions (2,476 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Diocletian and Constantine I, and of further developments during the 4th century. The legions were identified by Roman numerals, though the spelling sometimes
Diogenes (5,071 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
stamp) have been discovered at Sinope dating from the middle of the 4th century BC, and other coins of the time bear the name of Hicesias as the official
Lysander (1,869 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lysander (/laɪˈsændər, ˈlaɪˌsændər/; died 395 BC, Doric Greek: Λύσανδρος, romanized: Lýsandros) was a Spartan admiral who commanded the Spartan fleet in
Uncial 0162 (477 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gospel of John in Greek. It has been paleographically assigned a 3rd or 4th century CE date. Uncial 0162 is one of the manuscripts excavated by Bernard Pyne
Book of Jonah (2,756 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
written in the post-exilic period, some time between the late 5th to early 4th century BC. The story has a long interpretive history and has become well known
Aristoxenus (2,361 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aristoxenus of Tarentum (Greek: Ἀριστόξενος ὁ Ταραντῖνος; born c. 375, fl. 335 BC) was a Greek Peripatetic philosopher, and a pupil of Aristotle. Most
Axiothea of Phlius (192 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Axiothea of Phlius (Greek: Ἀξιοθέα Φλειασία fl. c. 350 BCE) was a female student of Plato and Speusippus. She was born in Phlius, an ancient city in the
Mayurasharma (1,036 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Havyaka Brahmins claim descent from these early Brahmin settlers of the 4th century called the Ahichatra brahmins or the Ahikaru/Havikaru. Mayurasharma was
Diogenes (5,071 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
stamp) have been discovered at Sinope dating from the middle of the 4th century BC, and other coins of the time bear the name of Hicesias as the official
Megalopolis, Greece (952 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Megalopoli (Greek: Μεγαλόπολη) is a town in the southwestern part of the regional unit of Arcadia, southern Greece. It is located in the same site as ancient
Bessus (810 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Bessus, also known by his throne name Artaxerxes V (died summer 329 BC), was a prominent Persian satrap of Bactria in Persia, and later self-proclaimed
Syria Palaestina (2,709 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Syria Palaestina (literally, "Palestinian Syria"; Latin: Sȳria Palaestīna [ˈsyː.ri.a pa.ɫ̪ae̯sˈt̪iː.na]; Koinē Greek: Συρία ἡ Παλαιστίνη, romanized: Syría
Saint Elen (564 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Luyddog, lit. "Helen of the Hosts"), often anglicized as Helen, was a late 4th-century founder of churches in Wales. Traditionally, she is said to have been
Aristotle (14,675 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jean (2014). Aristotle's Empiricism: Experience and Mechanics in the 4th century BC, Parmenides Publishing,ISBN 978-1930972834 Frede, Michael (1987).
Sosipatra (621 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Neoplatonist philosopher and mystic who lived in the first half of the 4th century CE. The story of her life is told in Eunapius' Lives of the Sophists
Pope Theophilus of Alexandria (939 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theophilus was the 23rd Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of the See of St. Mark. He became Pope at a time of conflict between the newly dominant Christians
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 123 (176 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
papyrus in the form of a sheet. The document was written in the 3rd or 4th century. Currently it is housed in the Egyptian Museum (10014) in Cairo, Egypt
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 112 (236 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the form of a sheet. The document was written in the late 3rd or early 4th century. Currently it is housed in the Vaughan Library at the Harrow School in
Lysander (1,869 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Lysander (/laɪˈsændər, ˈlaɪˌsændər/; died 395 BC, Doric Greek: Λύσανδρος, romanized: Lýsandros) was a Spartan admiral who commanded the Spartan fleet in
Sallustius (391 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
was a 4th-century writer, a friend of the Roman Emperor Julian. He wrote the treatise On the Gods and the Cosmos, a kind of catechism of 4th-century Hellenic
Byzantine architecture (4,058 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
formed, as at Church of St. George, Sofia, built by the Romans in the 4th century as a cylindrical domed structure built on a square base, and the noble
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 122 (303 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in the form of a sheet. The document was written in the late 3rd or 4th century. Currently it is housed in the British Museum (768) in London, England
Pandya dynasty (8,381 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pandyas finds mention in a number of Graeco-Roman sources (as early as 4th century BCE) and the edicts of Maurya emperor Asoka (3rd century BCE). The Pandyas
Hermit (3,861 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
hence also called "St. Paul the first hermit". Antony of Egypt (fl. 4th century), often referred to as "Antony the Great", is perhaps the most renowned
Heraclides Ponticus (1,008 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Heraclides Ponticus (Greek: Ἡρακλείδης ὁ Ποντικός Herakleides; c. 390 BC – c. 310 BC) was a Greek philosopher and astronomer who was born in Heraclea Pontica
Python of Aenus (153 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Python of Aenus (/ˈpaɪθɒn, ən/; Greek: Πύθων Αἴνιος; fl. 4th-century BCE) was a Greek philosopher and a former student of Plato. Around 360 BC, he and
Amaras Monastery (631 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The church of St. Grigoris of the Amaras Monastery (established in the 4th century, rebuilt in the 19th century) Religion Affiliation Armenian Apostolic
Menedemus of Pyrrha (67 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Menedemus of Pyrrha (Lesbos) (Greek: Μενέδημος; fl. c. 350 BC, was a member of Plato's Academy, during the time of Speusippus. Upon the death of Speusippus
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 4 (185 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and Hunt in 1897 in Oxyrhynchus. The fragment is dated to the early 4th century. It is housed in the library of the University of Cambridge. The text
Medieval Greek (6,105 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
beginning of Medieval Greek is occasionally dated back to as early as the 4th century, either to 330 AD, when the political centre of the Roman Empire was
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 120 (439 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
written on papyrus in the form of a sheet. The document was written in the 4th century. Currently it is housed at Haileybury College in Hertford Heath. This
Sicyon (2,022 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
4th century BC) sculptor Alexis (5th or 4th century BC) sculptor Eupompus (4th century BC) painter Pamphilus (4th century BC) painter Melanthius (4th
Erastus of Scepsis (62 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Erastus of Scepsis (/ɪˈræstəs/; Greek: Ἔραστος Σκήψιος) and his brother Coriscus were students of Plato. He was also a friend of Aristotle. Scepsis is
Lyceum (Classical) (2,566 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Lyceum (Ancient Greek: Λύκειον, romanized: Lykeion) or Lycaeum was a temple dedicated to Apollo Lyceus ("Apollo the wolf-god"). It was best known for
Antoninus (philosopher) (240 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Antoninus (Greek: Ἁντωνῖνος) was a Neoplatonist philosopher who lived in the 4th century. He was a son of Eustathius and Sosipatra, and had a school at Canopus
Hippocrates (4,580 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the works of John Tzetzes, Aristotle's "Politics", which date from the 4th century BC. Soranus wrote that Hippocrates' father was Heraclides, a physician
Zipoetes I of Bithynia (292 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Zipoetes I, also Zipoites I or Ziboetes I, possibly Tiboetes I (Greek: Zιπoίτης or Zιβoίτης (three syllables, oe is a diphthong); lived c. 354 BC – 278
Mencius (3,625 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Mencius (Chinese: 孟子); born Mèng kē (Chinese: 孟軻); (/ˈmɛnʃiəs/ MEN-shee-əs) or Mengzi (372–289 BC or 385–303 or 302 BC) was a Chinese Confucian philosopher
Demetrius of Amphipolis (46 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Demetrius of Amphipolis (Greek: Δημήτριος ὁ Ἀμφιπολίτης; fl. 4th century BC) was one of Plato's students. He is perhaps identical with the person mentioned
Scythians (13,617 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Empire. The Scythians suffered a major defeat against Macedonia in the 4th century BC and were subsequently gradually conquered by the Sarmatians, a related
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 109 (264 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in the form of a sheet. The document was written in the late 3rd or 4th century. Currently it is housed in the Houghton Library (SM. Inv. 2214) at Harvard
San Marco Evangelista al Campidoglio, Rome (1,227 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(façade) Architectural type Basilica Style Renaissance, Baroque Groundbreaking 4th century Completed 1470 Clergy Cardinal protector Angelo De Donatis
Tetrarchy (2,992 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Tetrarchy is the term adopted to describe the system of government of the ancient Roman Empire instituted by Roman Emperor Diocletian in 293, marking
Frumentius (954 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the Axumite Kingdom Bishop, Confessor and Apostle to Ethiopia Born 4th century Tyre, Eastern Roman Empire (modern-day Lebanon) Died c. 383 Kingdom of
Mithraism (20,241 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
were popular among the Imperial Roman army from about the 1st to the 4th century CE. Worshippers of Mithras had a complex system of seven grades of initiation
Gournay-sur-Aronde (73 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sanctuary that dates back to the 4th century BCE, and was burned and levelled at the end of the 1st century BCE. In the 4th century AD a Gallo-Roman temple was
Santa Pudenziana (1,478 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Santa Pudenziana is a church of Rome, a basilica built in the 4th century and dedicated to Saint Pudentiana, sister of Saint Praxedes and daughter of
Ariarathes I of Cappadocia (1,963 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
4th-century BC king of Cappadocia
Didymus the Blind (2,038 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sources Gauche, William (1934). Didymus the Blind: An educator of the 4th century. Washington, D. C.: Catholic University of America. Layton, Richard (2004)
Walls of Thessaloniki (224 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
urban fabric. The city was fortified from its establishment in the late 4th century BC, but the present walls date from the early Byzantine period, ca. 390
Roman Italy (2,536 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Italia (the Latin and Italian name for the Italian Peninsula) was the homeland of the Romans and metropole of Rome's empire in classical antiquity. According
Eudoxius of Antioch (1,010 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eudoxius (Ευδόξιος; died 370) was the eighth bishop of Constantinople from January 27, 360 to 370, previously bishop of Germanicia and of Antioch. Eudoxius
Roman Italy (2,536 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Italia (the Latin and Italian name for the Italian Peninsula) was the homeland of the Romans and metropole of Rome's empire in classical antiquity. According
Kofun period (4,482 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Hashihaka Kofun, Shibuya Mukaiyama Kofun) were built during the early 4th century. The keyhole kofun spread from Yamato to Kawachi—with giant kofun, such
Ariarathes I of Cappadocia (1,963 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
4th-century BC king of Cappadocia
Greek mathematics (2,037 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
through the Hellenistic periods, extant from the 7th century BC to the 4th century AD, around the shores of the Eastern Mediterranean. Greek mathematicians
Ardashir II (1,359 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ardashir II (Middle Persian 𐭠𐭥𐭲𐭧𐭱𐭲𐭥, New Persian: اردشیر نیکوکار, Ardashir), was the eleventh king (shah) of the Sasanian Empire, ruling from 379
Pallava script (458 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
named after the Pallava dynasty of Southern India, attested since the 4th century AD. In India, Pallava script evolved into the Grantha script. Pallava
Herostratus (1,437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Herostratus (Ancient Greek: Ἡρόστρατος) was a 4th-century BC Greek arsonist, who sought notoriety by destroying the second Temple of Artemis in Ephesus
Heraclides of Aenus (40 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Heraclides of Aenus (Greek: Ἡρακλείδης Αἴνιος) was one of Plato's students. Around 360 BC, he and his brother Python assassinated Cotys I, the ruler of
Atropates (782 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Atropates (Greek Aτρoπάτης, from Old Persian Aturpat "guardian of fire"; c. 370 BC – after 321 BC) was a Persian nobleman who served Darius III, then Alexander
Philippi (1,919 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
congregations in Europe, attestation of a bishopric dates only from the 4th century. The prosperity of the city in the 5th and 6th centuries was attributed[by
Vitus (1,624 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Vitus (/ˈvaɪtəs/), according to Christian legend, was a Christian saint from Sicily. He died as a martyr during the persecution of Christians by co-ruling
Psalms 152–155 (471 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Psalms 152 to 155 are additional Psalms found in two Syriac biblical manuscripts to date and several manuscripts of Elias of al-Anbar's "Book of Discipline"
Maximus I of Constantinople (1,106 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Maximus, also known as Maximus I or Maximus the Cynic, was the intrusive archbishop of Constantinople in 380, where he became a rival of Gregory Nazianzus
Coriscus of Scepsis (71 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coriscus of Scepsis (/kɔːˈrɪskəs/; Greek: Κορίσκος Σκήψιος) and his brother Erastus were students of Plato. He was also a friend of Aristotle. Coriscus'
Santi Giovanni e Paolo al Celio (1,047 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Basilica of Saints John and Paul on the Caelian Hill (Italian: Basilica dei Santi Giovanni e Paolo al Celio) is an ancient basilica church in Rome
Capernaum (3,375 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
which remained in use until the early 4th century. The great transformation of one of the homes in the 4th century. The octagonal church in the middle of
Uí Maine (872 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
• 357–407 Máine Mór • 1593–1611 Feardorcha Ó Cellaigh History   • Established 4th century • Disestablished 1611 ISO 3166 code IE Today part of  Ireland
Orontes I (916 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Orontes I or Yervand I (Old Persian: *Arvanta-) was an Bactrian nobleman, who ruled as satrap of the Achaemenid satrapy of Armenia from 401 to 344 BC.
Platonic Academy (2,951 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
1st century AD), the Proto-Helladic Vaulted House and the Peristyle Building (4th century BC), which is perhaps the only major building that belonged to the actual
Yue (state) (1,681 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Yue (Chinese: 越, Old Chinese: *[ɢ]ʷat), also known as Yuyue (於越), was a state in ancient China which existed during the first millennium BC – the Spring
Lyceum (Classical) (2,566 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
The Lyceum (Ancient Greek: Λύκειον, romanized: Lykeion) or Lycaeum was a temple dedicated to Apollo Lyceus ("Apollo the wolf-god"). It was best known for
Saint Rais (181 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Rais, also known as Iraida, Irais, Herais or Rhais, is a martyr venerated by the Roman Catholic and the Eastern Orthodox churches. According to one account
Antoninus (philosopher) (240 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Antoninus (Greek: Ἁντωνῖνος) was a Neoplatonist philosopher who lived in the 4th century. He was a son of Eustathius and Sosipatra, and had a school at Canopus
Lysimachia (Thrace) (515 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Lysimachia (Greek: Λυσιμάχεια) was an important Hellenistic Greek town on the north-western extremity of the Thracian Chersonese (the modern Gallipoli
Carthaginian Iberia (589 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Lady of Baza, Lady of Guardamar, and Lady of Elche, are dated around 4th century BC. The Lady of Guardamar, found in 1987, is in the Museum of Alicante
Crantor (548 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(leader) of the Old Academy, probably born around the middle of the 4th century BC, at Soli in Cilicia. Crantor moved to Athens in order to study philosophy
Verena (999 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
jar (her conventional attribute) Born 3rd century Thebes, Egypt Died 4th century Bad Zurzach, Switzerland Venerated in Roman Catholic Church Oriental
Sosipatra (621 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Neoplatonist philosopher and mystic who lived in the first half of the 4th century CE. The story of her life is told in Eunapius' Lives of the Sophists
Chrysanthius (202 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Chrysanthius of Sardis (Greek: Χρυσάνθιος) was a Greek philosopher of the 4th century AD who studied at the school of Iamblichus. He was one of the favorite
Biblical manuscript (4,575 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
papyri are very early because parchment began to replace papyrus in the 4th century (although the latest papyri date to the 8th century). Similarly, the
Te Deum (1,818 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
been deprecated, so that the hymn, while almost certainly dating to the 4th century, is considered as being of uncertain authorship. Authorship of Nicetas
Four Crowned Martyrs (1,570 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The designation Four Crowned Martyrs or Four Holy Crowned Ones (Latin, Sancti Quatuor Coronati) refers to nine individuals venerated as martyrs and saints
Philip of Opus (563 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Philip (or Philippus) of Opus (Greek: Φίλιππος Ὀπούντιος), was a philosopher and a member of the Academy during Plato's lifetime. Philip was the editor
Classical Athens (3,232 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The city of Athens (Ancient Greek: Ἀθῆναι, Athênai [a.tʰɛ̂ː.nai̯]; Modern Greek: Αθήναι Athine [a.ˈθi.ne̞] or, more commonly and in singular, Αθήνα Athina
Mar Awgin (563 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mar Awgin Father of Monasticism in Mesopotamia Born 4th century Suez, Egypt Died 363 Nisibis, Turkey Venerated in Armenian Apostolic Church Assyrian Church
Niall of the Nine Hostages (3,673 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Niall Noígíallach (Old Irish pronunciation: [ˈniːəl noɪˈɣiːələx], Old Irish "having nine hostages"), or in English, Niall of the Nine Hostages, was an
Maximus of Ephesus (1,215 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
in very negative terms. Maximus was born around the beginning of the 4th century. Ammianus Marcellinus calls Ephesus the hometown of Maximus. This is
Muiredach Tirech (239 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Muiredach Tirech, son of Fiacha Sraibhtine, was a legendary High King of Ireland of the fourth century. He gained power by exiling the three Collas, who
Moab (3,204 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Coordinates: 31°54′00″N 35°45′00″E / 31.90000°N 35.75000°E / 31.90000; 35.75000 Moab (/ˈmoʊæb/) is the name of an ancient kingdom that is today located
Archelaus I of Macedon (637 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Archelaus I (/ˌɑːrkɪˈleɪ.əs/; Ancient Greek: Ἀρχέλαος, romanized: Archélaos, lit. 'Lord of the People') was a king of the ancient kingdom of Macedon from
Syncletica of Alexandria (315 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 Synkletikḗ) was a Christian saint and Desert Mother from Roman Egypt in the 4th century. She is the subject of the Vita S. Syncleticæ, a Greek hagiography purportedly
Katarovank (435 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Hadrut Region of the Nagorno-Karabakh Republic. It was founded in the 4th century. The present structure was completed in the 17th century. The 5th century
Western Ganga dynasty (7,030 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
ancestry of the founders of the Western Ganga dynasty (prior to the 4th century). Some mythical accounts point to a northern origin, while theories based
Oxyrhynchus Gospels (770 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
text written on both sides in a tiny neat hand that dates it to the 4th century, almost square, less than 10 cm across. It is kept at the Bodleian Library
Demetrius of Phalerum (1,728 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Demetrius of Phalerum (also Demetrius of Phaleron or Demetrius Phalereus; Greek: Δημήτριος ὁ Φαληρεύς; c. 350 – c. 280 BC) was an Athenian orator originally
Eudoxus (Martian crater) (116 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
in diameter. It was named after Greek astronomer Eudoxus of Cnidus (4th century BC), and the name was approved in 1973. The closest named crater is Hipparchus
Ctesias (772 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
For the beetle genus, see Ctesias (beetle). Ctesias (/ˈtiːʒəs/; Ancient Greek: Κτησίας, Ktēsíās, 5th century BC), also known as Ctesias the Cnidian or
Menedemus of Pyrrha (67 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Menedemus of Pyrrha (Lesbos) (Greek: Μενέδημος; fl. c. 350 BC, was a member of Plato's Academy, during the time of Speusippus. Upon the death of Speusippus
Python of Aenus (153 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Python of Aenus (/ˈpaɪθɒn, ən/; Greek: Πύθων Αἴνιος; fl. 4th-century BCE) was a Greek philosopher and a former student of Plato. Around 360 BC, he and
Valerius Valens (588 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Aurelius Valerius Valens (died March 1, 317) was Roman Emperor from late 316 to March 1, 317. Valens had previously been dux limitis (duke of the frontier)
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 86 (239 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 86 (P. Oxy. 86) is a complaint of a pilot of a public boat, written in Greek. The manuscript was written on papyrus in the form of
Mosaic (13,516 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome. Early Christian basilicas from the 4th century onwards were decorated with wall and ceiling mosaics. Mosaic art flourished
Later Yan (147 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Later Yan (simplified Chinese: 后燕; traditional Chinese: 後燕; pinyin: Hòu Yān; 384-407 or 409) was a Murong–Xianbei state, located in modern-day northeast
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 93 (220 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 93 (P. Oxy. 93) is an order for payment, written in Greek. The manuscript was written on papyrus in the form of a sheet. It was discovered
Antigonia (Syria) (221 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Antigonia (Greek: Αντιγόνεια) also transliterated as Antigonea and Antigoneia was a Hellenistic city in Seleucid Empire, Syria (in modern Turkey), on the
Achaemenid Empire (17,670 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Boyce also assigns that development to the reign of Artaxerxes II (4th century BC), as an orthodox response to the innovation of the shrine cults.[citation
Nepherites II (384 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Nepherites II or Nefaarud II was the last pharaoh of the feeble and short-lived Twenty-ninth Dynasty (399/8–380 BC), the penultimate native dynasty of
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 42 (137 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 42 (P. Oxy. 42) is a proclamation of Dioscorides written in Greek. It was discovered by Grenfell and Hunt in 1897 in Oxyrhynchus. The
Magnentius (509 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magnus Magnentius (c. 303 – 11 August 353) was a usurper of the Roman Empire from 350 to 353. Born in Samarobriva (Amiens), Gaul, Magnentius was the commander
Conan Meriadoc (1,387 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Conan Meriadoc (/ˈkoʊnən/) is a legendary British leader credited with founding Brittany. Versions of his story circulated in both Brittany and Great Britain
Former Liang (302 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Former Liang (Chinese: 前涼; pinyin: Qián Liáng; 320–376) was a state of the Sixteen Kingdoms during the Jin dynasty (265–420) in China. It was founded
Abadiu of Antinoe (57 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Abadiu Bishop of Antinoe Born 4th century Egypt Died 4th century Egypt Venerated in Catholic Church Eastern Orthodox Church Oriental Orthodoxy Feast
Tyrannius Rufinus (1,732 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Apostles' Creed which gives evidence of its use and interpretation in 4th-century Italy. (Commentary on the Apostles' Creed, at New Advent) The Church
Jin (Chinese state) (2,915 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Jin (Chinese: 晉, Old Chinese: *tsi[n]-s), originally known as Tang (唐), was a major state during the middle part of the Zhou dynasty, based near the centre
Ancient Macedonian language (5,767 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Indo-European language family. It gradually fell out of use during the 4th century BC, marginalized by the use of Attic Greek by the Macedonian aristocracy
Hipparchia of Maroneia (1,937 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hipparchia of Maroneia (/hɪˈpɑːrkiə/; Greek: Ἱππαρχία ἡ Μαρωνεῖτις; fl. c. 325 BC) was a Cynic philosopher, and wife of Crates of Thebes. She was the sister
Dorothea of Alexandria (196 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Dorothea of Alexandria (died c. 320) is venerated as a Christian virgin martyr. Her legend states that the Roman Emperor Maximinus Daia courted her
Calcidius (1,426 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Calcidius (or Chalcidius) was a 4th-century philosopher (and possibly a Christian) who translated the first part (to 53c) of Plato's Timaeus from Greek
Magas of Cyrene (1,656 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Magas of Cyrene (Greek: Μάγας ὁ Κυρηναῖος; born before 317 BC – 250 BC, ruled 276 BC – 250 BC) was a Greek King of Cyrenaica. Through his mother’s second
Helmet of Coțofenești (1,052 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
/kotsofeneʃti/) is a Geto-Dacian helmet dating from the first half of the 4th century BC. In 1929, a child named Traian Simion uncovered the helmet by chance
Abib and Apollo (472 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Saints Abib & Apollo Monks Born 4th century Akhmim, Egypt Died November 4 (4th century) Egypt Venerated in Coptic Orthodox Church Armenian Apostolic Church
Saint Florian (1,209 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Florian (Latin: Florianus; 250 – c. 304 AD) was a Christian holy man, and the patron saint of Linz, Austria; chimney sweeps; soapmakers, and firefighters
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 41 (149 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 41 (P. Oxy. 41) is a report of a public meeting by an unknown author, written in Greek. It was discovered by Grenfell and Hunt in 1897
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 103 (247 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 103 (P. Oxy. 103 or P. Oxy. I 103) is a lease of some land, written in Greek and discovered in Oxyrhynchus. The manuscript was written
Hungarians (7,087 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hungarians, also known as Magyars (Hungarian: magyarok), are a nation and ethnic group native to Hungary (Hungarian: Magyarország) and historical Hungarian
Poemen (881 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Abba Poemen The Great (Greek: Ὁ Ἅγιος Ποιμήν; ποιμήν means "shepherd") (c. 340–450) was a Christian monk and early Desert Father who is the most quoted
Byzantine Armenia (914 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Byzantine Armenia, sometimes known as Western Armenia, is the name given to the parts of Kingdom of Armenia that became part of the Byzantine Empire. The
Pyrrho (2,086 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pyrrho of Elis (/ˈpɪroʊ/; Ancient Greek: Πύρρων ὁ Ἠλεῖος, romanized: Pyrrhо̄n ho Ēleios; c. 360 – c. 270 BC) was a Greek philosopher of Classical antiquity
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 85 (270 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 85 (P. Oxy. 85) is part of a series of declarations by various guilds of workmen, written in Greek. The manuscript was written on papyrus
Upatissa I of Anuradhapura (52 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Upatissa I was King of Anuradhapura in the 4th century, whose reign lasted from 370 to 412. He succeeded his father Buddhadasa as King of Anuradhapura
Hestiaeus of Perinthus (44 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hestiaeus of Perinthus (Greek: Ἑστιαῖος Περίνθιος) was one of Plato's students. Diogenes Laërtius, Life of Plato. Translated by C.D. Yonge. Guthrie W.K
Coel Hen (1,376 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
since the Middle Ages. Early Welsh tradition knew of a Coel Hen, a c. 4th-century leader in Roman or Sub-Roman Britain and the progenitor of several kingly
Polyperchon (764 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Polyperchon (Greek: Πολυπέρχων; b. between 390-380 BC – d. after 304 BC, possibly into 3rd century BC, was a Macedonian general who served both Philip
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 64 (178 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 64 (P. Oxy. 64) is an order for an arrest, written in Greek. The manuscript was written on papyrus in the form of a sheet. It was discovered
Kay Darab (77 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Zoroastrian Persia after his father Kai Bahman and his mother Homai in the 4th century BC. He is the subject of the 12th-century Darab Nama. According to shahnameh
Book of Leviticus (3,382 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Book of Leviticus (/lɪˈvɪtɪkəs/) is the third book of the Torah and of the Old Testament; scholars generally agree that it developed over a long period
Perdiccas (1,376 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Perdiccas (Greek: Περδίκκας, Perdikkas; c. 355 BC – 321/320 BC) became a general in Alexander the Great's army and participated in Alexander's campaign
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 60 (168 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 60 (P. Oxy. 60) is a letter addressed to the council of Oxyrhynchus, written by the strategus Hermias, in Greek. The manuscript was
Psammuthes (330 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Psammuthes or Psammuthis, was a pharaoh of the Twenty-ninth Dynasty of Egypt during 392/1 BC. The place of this king in the dynasty is a matter of debate
Temple of Minerva Medica (nymphaeum) (428 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
the nymphs and often connected to the water supply, that dates to the 4th century. The decagonal structure in opus latericium is relatively well preserved
Eochaid Mugmedon (536 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eochaid Mugmedón (pronounced [ˈɛxəð ˈmʊɣvʲəðən]) was a legendary Irish king. According to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, Eochaid was a
Marcus Furius Camillus (2,431 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
4th-century BC Roman Dictators and general
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 65 (168 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 65 (P. Oxy. 65) is an order for an arrest, written in Greek. The manuscript was written on papyrus in the form of a sheet. It was discovered
Julius Obsequens (1,015 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Julius Obsequens was a Roman writer active in the 4th or early 5th centuries AD, during late antiquity. His sole known work is the Prodigiorum liber (Book
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 87 (244 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 87 (P. Oxy. 87) is a declaration on oath by a ship owner, written in Greek. The manuscript was written on papyrus in the form of a
Ancient Greek (4,380 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
centuries BC), and Hellenistic period (Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to 4th century AD). It is preceded by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by Medieval Greek
Gereon (437 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
soldier, was martyred at Cologne by beheading, probably in the early 4th century. According to his legend, Gereon (called the "Golden Saint") was said
Ecclesiastes (4,319 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ecclesiastes (/ɪˌkliːziˈæstiːz/; Hebrew: קֹהֶלֶת‎, qōheleṯ, Greek: Ἐκκλησιαστής, Ekklēsiastēs) is one of the 24 books of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible), where
Theodora and Didymus (432 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and Didymus (died 304) are Christian saints whose legend is based on a 4th-century acta and the word of Saint Ambrose. The pair were martyred in the reigns
Calcidius (1,426 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Calcidius (or Chalcidius) was a 4th-century philosopher (and possibly a Christian) who translated the first part (to 53c) of Plato's Timaeus from Greek
Upatissa I of Anuradhapura (52 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Upatissa I was King of Anuradhapura in the 4th century, whose reign lasted from 370 to 412. He succeeded his father Buddhadasa as King of Anuradhapura
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 5 (198 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 5 (P. Oxy. 5) is a fragment of a Christian homily, written in Greek. It was discovered by Grenfell and Hunt in 1897 in Oxyrhynchus
Ancient Greek (4,380 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
centuries BC), and Hellenistic period (Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to 4th century AD). It is preceded by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by Medieval Greek
Antakya (2,914 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Antiókheia, also known as "Antioch on the Orontes"), which was founded in the 4th century BC by the Seleucid. Antioch later became one of the Roman Empire's largest
Valentinian I (4,647 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Valentinian I (Latin: Flavius Valentinianus; 3 July 321 – 17 November 375), also known as Valentinian the Great, was Roman emperor from 364 to 375. Upon
Byzantine Armenia (914 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Byzantine Armenia, sometimes known as Western Armenia, is the name given to the parts of Kingdom of Armenia that became part of the Byzantine Empire. The
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 83 (208 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 83 (P. Oxy. 83) is a declaration by an egg-seller, written in Greek. The manuscript was written on papyrus in the form of a sheet.
Dexippus (philosopher) (177 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
pupil of the Neoplatonist Iamblichus, belonging to the middle of the 4th century AD. He wrote commentaries on Plato and Aristotle of which one, an explanation
Eastern Iranian languages (1,246 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Iranian languages emerging in Middle Iranian times (from c. the 4th century BC). The Avestan language is often classified as early Eastern Iranian
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 65 (168 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 65 (P. Oxy. 65) is an order for an arrest, written in Greek. The manuscript was written on papyrus in the form of a sheet. It was discovered
Scythia (3,005 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Scythia's social development at the end of the 5th century BC and in the 4th century BC was linked to its privileged status of trade with Greeks, its efforts
Temple of Minerva Medica (nymphaeum) (428 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
the nymphs and often connected to the water supply, that dates to the 4th century. The decagonal structure in opus latericium is relatively well preserved
Red-figure pottery (8,005 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
4th century BC. Large and medium-sized vessels like kraters and jugs were decorated mostly with mythological scenes. In the course of the 4th century
Ecclesiastical Latin (2,853 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ecclesiastical Latin, also called Church Latin, Liturgical Latin or Italian Latin, is a form of Latin initially developed to discuss Christian thought
Speusippus (2,151 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Speusippus (/spjuːˈsɪpəs/; Greek: Σπεύσιππος; c. 408 – 339/8 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher. Speusippus was Plato's nephew by his sister Potone.
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 52 (180 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 52 (P. Oxy. 52) is a report from two public physicians, written in Greek. The manuscript was written on papyrus in the form of a sheet
Eteocypriot language (900 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from about the 10th century BC and finally became extinct in about the 4th century BC. The language is as yet unknown except for a small vocabulary attested
Saint Afra (620 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Afra (died 304) was martyred during the Diocletian persecution. Along with Saint Ulrich, she is a patron saint of Augsburg. Her feast day is August
Kay Darab (77 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Zoroastrian Persia after his father Kai Bahman and his mother Homai in the 4th century BC. He is the subject of the 12th-century Darab Nama. According to shahnameh
Onesicritus (896 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Onesicritus (Greek: Ὀνησίκριτος; c. 360 BC – c. 290 BC), a Greek historical writer and Cynic philosopher, who accompanied Alexander the Great on his campaigns
Formal system (1,629 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
A formal system is used for inferring theorems from axioms according to a set of rules. These rules, which are used for carrying out the inference of theorems
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 29 (282 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 29 (P. Oxy. 29) is a fragment of the second book of the Elements of Euclid in Greek. It was discovered by Grenfell and Hunt in 1897
Priscus of Epirus (251 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Priscus of Epirus (c. 305 – c. 395 AD) was a Neoplatonist philosopher and theurgist, a colleague of Maximus of Ephesus, and a friend of the emperor Julian
Cirta (1,809 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cuicul, and Milevum. The city was destroyed in the beginning of the 4th century and was rebuilt by the Roman emperor Constantine the Great, who gave
Saint Alban (7,789 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Roman city of Verulamium (modern St Albans) sometime during the 3rd or 4th century, and his cult has been celebrated there since ancient times. Alban lived
Villa Romana del Casale (2,022 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Heritage Site. The villa and artwork contained within date to the early 4th century AD. The mosaic and opus sectile floors cover some 3,500 sq metres and
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 64 (178 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 64 (P. Oxy. 64) is an order for an arrest, written in Greek. The manuscript was written on papyrus in the form of a sheet. It was discovered
Diocese of Egypt (768 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the early 4th century as Aegyptus Iovia, under a praeses Augustamnica (eastern Nile delta), originally established in the early 4th century as Aegyptus
Polykleitos (2,035 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
considered one of the most important sculptors of classical antiquity. The 4th century BC catalogue attributed to Xenocrates (the "Xenocratic catalogue"), which
Berenice I of Egypt (489 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Berenice I (Greek: Βερενίκη; c. 340 BC – between 279 and 268 BC) was Queen of Egypt by marriage to Ptolemy I Soter. She became the second queen, after
Hor, Besoy, and Daydara (114 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Saints Hor, Besoy and Daydara Martyrs Born 4th century Alexandria, Egypt Died 4th century Alexandria, Egypt Venerated in Coptic Orthodox Church Assyrian
San Crisogono, Rome (1,669 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
tituli, the first parish churches of Rome, and was probably built in the 4th century under Pope Silvester I (314–335), rebuilt in the 12th century by John
Hestiaeus of Perinthus (44 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hestiaeus of Perinthus (Greek: Ἑστιαῖος Περίνθιος) was one of Plato's students. Diogenes Laërtius, Life of Plato. Translated by C.D. Yonge. Guthrie W.K
Ptolemaic Kingdom (11,877 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Ptolemaic Kingdom (/ˌtɒlɪˈmeɪ.ɪk/; Koinē Greek: Πτολεμαϊκὴ βασιλεία, romanized: Ptolemaïkḕ basileía) was an ancient Hellenistic state based in Egypt
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 66 (184 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 66 (P. Oxy. 66) consists of two letters concerning the erection of a statue to a praefect, written in Greek. The manuscript was written
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 53 (195 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 53 (P. Oxy. 53) is a report on a persea tree, written in Greek. The manuscript was written on papyrus in the form of a sheet. It was
Macarius of Alexandria (486 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Macarius of Alexandria (died 395) was a monk in the Nitrian Desert. He was a slightly younger contemporary of Macarius of Egypt, and is thus also
Macedonia (ancient kingdom) (24,402 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
the north, Thrace to the east and Thessaly to the south. Before the 4th century BC, Macedonia was a small kingdom outside of the area dominated by the
Thaton Kingdom (851 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mon kingdom, believed to have existed in Lower Burma from at least the 4th century BC to the middle of the 11th century AD. One of many Mon kingdoms that
Euaeon of Lampsacus (21 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Euaeon of Lampsacus (Greek: Εὐαίων Λαμψακηνός) was one of Plato's students. Diogenes Laërtius, Life of Plato. Translated by C.D. Yonge.
Nectanebo I (1,076 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kheperkare Nakhtnebef, better known by his hellenized name Nectanebo I, was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh, founder of the last native dynasty of Egypt, the
Timolaus of Cyzicus (35 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Timolaus of Cyzicus (Greek: Τιμόλαος Κυζικηνός) was one of Plato's students. Cyzicus is an ancient city of Mysia, located in the northwest of Asia Minor
Ge Hong (694 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ge Hong (葛洪; b. 283 - d. 343 or 364 ) was an Eastern Jin Dynasty scholar, and the author of Essays on Chinese Characters. He is the originator of First
Arch of Janus (520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
that went from the Forum to the River Tiber. It was built in the early 4th century CE, using spolia, i.e. material from earlier buildings, including bricks
Macedonia (ancient kingdom) (24,402 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
the north, Thrace to the east and Thessaly to the south. Before the 4th century BC, Macedonia was a small kingdom outside of the area dominated by the
Severian of Gabala (675 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Severian, Bishop of Gabala in Syria (* before 380; † after 408, but probably before 425), was a popular preacher in Constantinople from around 398/399
Ermanaric (1,133 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ermanaric (Gothic: *Aírmanareiks; Latin: Ermanaricus or Hermanaricus; Old English: Eormanrīc [ˈeormɑnriːtʃ]; Old Norse: Jörmunrekr [ˈjɔrmunrekr]; died
Amphibalus (1,908 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
death. He was believed to be a citizen of Caerleon during the 3rd- or 4th-century. During a religious persecution, Alban sheltered Amphibalus from persecutors
Goths (14,002 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
were in frequent conflict and contact with the Roman Empire. By the 4th century at the latest, several groups were distinguishable, among whom the Thervingi
Pyrrhonism (3,146 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
School of philosophical skepticism founded by Pyrrho, in Greece, 4th century, BCE
Demiana (1,461 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
written by Christodoulou, the disciple of Saint Julius El-Akfahsee (4th century). Saint Demiana is the founder of monasticism for Coptic Orthodox nuns
Mahajanapadas (5,318 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
republican form of government during the 6th to 5th centuries BCE. In the 4th century BCE, Kautiliya's Arthashastra also attests the Kurus following the Rajashabdopajivin
Polykleitos (2,035 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
considered one of the most important sculptors of classical antiquity. The 4th century BC catalogue attributed to Xenocrates (the "Xenocratic catalogue"), which
Chanakya (6,231 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
been composed before the Gupta era. It is dated variously from the late 4th century to the 8th century. The Mudrarakshasa legend contains narratives not
Chandragupta Maurya (8,201 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kshemendra's Brihatkathamanjari. Buddhist sources are those dated in 4th-century or after, including the Sri Lankan Pali texts Dipavamsa (Rajavamsa section)
Saint Afra (620 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Afra (died 304) was martyred during the Diocletian persecution. Along with Saint Ulrich, she is a patron saint of Augsburg. Her feast day is August
Old St. Peter's Basilica (1,933 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fresco showing cutaway view of Constantine's St. Peter's Basilica as it looked in the 4th century
Macarius of Alexandria (486 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Macarius of Alexandria (died 395) was a monk in the Nitrian Desert. He was a slightly younger contemporary of Macarius of Egypt, and is thus also
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 71 (191 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 71 (P. Oxy. 71) contains two petitions with a fragment of a third, addressed to the praefect and written in Greek. The manuscript was
Sirimeghavanna of Anuradhapura (419 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Kirthi Sri Meghavarna and Kithsirimevan was King of Anuradhapura in the 4th century. According to the traditional chronology, he ruled during 304–332 CE;
Ulfilas (1,518 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ulfilas (c. 311–383), also known as Ulphilas and Orphila, all Latinized forms of the unattested Gothic form *𐍅𐌿𐌻𐍆𐌹𐌻𐌰 Wulfila, literally "Little
List of Italian desserts and pastries (246 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
centuries of social and political changes, with roots as far back as the 4th century BCE. Affogato Angel wings Barbajada Baxin Biscotti Biscuit Tortoni Bombolone
Hellespontine Phrygia (555 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
An Achaemenid dynast of Hellespontine Phrygia attacking a Greek psilos, Altıkulaç Sarcophagus, early 4th century BC.
Adurbad-i Mahraspand (860 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Ādurbād-ī Mahraspand ("Ādurbād, son of Mahraspand") was an influential Zoroastrian high priest (mowbedan mowbed) during the reign of the Sasanian king
Irish language (11,706 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
became Canada. With a basic written form dating back to at least the 4th century CE, and written Irish in a Latinic script since the 5th century, Irish
Artabazos II (1,065 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
4th-century BC Persian satrap
Arch of Janus (520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
that went from the Forum to the River Tiber. It was built in the early 4th century CE, using spolia, i.e. material from earlier buildings, including bricks
Nativity of Jesus in art (5,134 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Nativity of Jesus has been a major subject of Christian art since the 4th century. The artistic depictions of the Nativity or birth of Jesus, celebrated
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 67 (220 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 67 (P. Oxy. 67) contains three letters about a dispute concerning property, written in Greek. The manuscript was written on papyrus
Santi Cosma e Damiano (1,068 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
which now houses a small archeological exhibit, was built in the early 4th century as a Roman temple. It is thought to have been dedicated to Valerius Romulus
Saint Claudia (340 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
speculation, such as that she was: The mother of Linus. According to the 4th-century Apostolic Constitutions, he was the first bishop of Rome, ordained by
Yazdegerd I (2,947 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Yazdegerd I, also spelled Yazdgerd I and Yazdgird I (Middle Persian: 𐭩𐭦𐭣𐭪𐭥𐭲𐭩‎), was the Sasanian King of Kings of Iran from 399 to 420. A son of
Eber-Nari (1,282 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Eber-Nari (Akkadian also Ebir-Nari, Abar-Nahara עבר-נהרה (Aramaic) or 'Ābēr Nahrā (Syriac) meaning "Beyond the River" or "Across the River" in both the
Great Palace of Constantinople (1,455 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Great Palace of Constantinople (Greek: Μέγα Παλάτιον, Méga Palátion; Latin: Palatium Magnum, Turkish: Büyük Saray), also known as the Sacred Palace
Peripatetic school (2,424 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Peripatetic school was a school of philosophy in Ancient Greece. Its teachings derived from its founder, Aristotle (384–322 BC), and peripatetic is
Bas of Bithynia (108 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
4th-century BC ruler of Bithynia
Sacramentary of Serapion of Thmuis (1,472 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
for 4th-century ritual is scanty as compared with Syria. The rites form a link between those of the Egyptian Church Order (a 3rd- or early 4th-century development
Patanjali (3,897 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
have lived between 2nd century BCE to 4th century CE, with more scholars accepting dates between 2nd and 4th century CE. The Yogasutras is one of the most
Nectanebo I (1,076 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Kheperkare Nakhtnebef, better known by his hellenized name Nectanebo I, was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh, founder of the last native dynasty of Egypt, the
The Vision of Dorotheus (3,768 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and rediscover his Christian faith. The poem, penned sometime in the 4th-century, depicts the Kingdom of Heaven in an Imperial fashion; Christ is enthroned
Kingdom of Kush (7,259 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Kingdom of Kush (/kʊʃ, kʌʃ/; Egyptian: 𓎡𓄿𓈙𓈉 kꜣš, Assyrian: Ku-u-si, in LXX Ancient Greek: Κυς and Κυσι; Coptic: ⲉϭⲱϣ; Hebrew: כּוּשׁ‎) was an ancient
Hellenica (1,357 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
simply means writings on Greek (Hellenic) subjects. Several histories of 4th-century Greece, written in the mould of Thucydides or straying from it, have
Leonnatus (280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leonnatus (Greek: Λεοννάτος; 356 BC – 322 BC) was a Macedonian officer of Alexander the Great and one of the diadochi. He was a member of the royal house
Philiscus of Aegina (231 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Φιλίσκος Αἰγινήτης; fl. 4th century BC) was a Cynic philosopher from Aegina who lived in the latter half of the 4th century BC. He was the son of Onesicritus
Eustathius of Cappadocia (215 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
pupil of Iamblichus and Aedesius, who lived at the beginning of the 4th century CE. When Aedesius was obliged to quit Cappadocia, Eustathius was left
Mohrael (576 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Mohrael is a Coptic Saint and Martyr. She was martyred in the 4th century AD at the age of 12 years. St. Mohrael came from a pious family. Abbouna
Underworld Painter (445 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Greek Apulian vase painter whose works date to the second half of the 4th century BC. The Underworld Painter is the successor of the Darius Painter, in
Emperor Nintoku (1,122 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emperor Nintoku (仁徳天皇, Nintoku-tennō), also known as Ohosazaki no Sumeramikoto (大鷦鷯天皇) was the 16th legendary Emperor of Japan, according to the traditional
Cherchell (3,545 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Cherchell (Arabic: شرشال) is a town on Algeria's Mediterranean coast, 89 kilometers (55 mi) west of Algiers. It is the seat of Cherchell District in Tipaza
Varazdat (1,247 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Armenian: Վարազդատ, Latinized: Varasdates; Greek: Βαρασδάτης; flourished 4th century) was a king of Arsacid Armenia from 374 until 378. Derived from Middle
Sicani (610 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Sicani (Greek Σικανοί Sikanoi) or Sicanians were one of three ancient peoples of Sicily present at the time of Phoenician and Greek colonization. The
Latin League (549 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Latin League (c. 7th century BC – 338 BC) was an ancient confederation of about 30 villages and tribes in the region of Latium near the ancient city
Emperor Ōjin (1,306 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emperor Ōjin (応神天皇, Ōjin-tennō), also known as Hondawake no Mikoto (誉田別尊) or Homuta no Sumeramikoto (譽田天皇), was the 15th legendary Emperor of Japan, according
Euphratensis (173 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Euphratensis (Latin for "Euphratean"; Greek: Εὑφρατησία, Euphratēsía), fully Augusta Euphratensis, was a late Roman and then Byzantine province in Syrian
Sirimeghavanna of Anuradhapura (419 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Kirthi Sri Meghavarna and Kithsirimevan was King of Anuradhapura in the 4th century. According to the traditional chronology, he ruled during 304–332 CE;
Orontes II (1,269 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
II (Armenian: Երուանդ , Yervand ) was a Persian noble living in the 4th century BC. He is probably to be identified as the satrap of Armenia under Darius
Paul of Tammah (297 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Paul of Tammah Hermit Born 4th century Egypt Died October 17th, 415 Mountain of Ansena, Egypt Venerated in Coptic Orthodox Church Armenian Apostolic
The Vision of Dorotheus (3,768 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
and rediscover his Christian faith. The poem, penned sometime in the 4th-century, depicts the Kingdom of Heaven in an Imperial fashion; Christ is enthroned
Varrese Painter (414 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Apulian red-figure vase painter. His works are dated to the middle of the 4th century BC. His conventional name is derived from the Varrese hypogeum (a rock-cut
Seleucia (1,725 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
churches in Mesopotamia from the 1st century onwards and in the 3rd or 4th century Seleucia became an important centre. Following the edict of toleration
Later Zhao (234 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Later Zhao (simplified Chinese: 后赵; traditional Chinese: 後趙; pinyin: Hòuzhào; 319–351) was a state of the Sixteen Kingdoms during the Jin dynasty (266–420)
Ancient Corinth (5,996 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
BC), athlete Dinarchus (4th century BC), orator and logographer Diocles (8th century BC), athlete Diogenes of Sinope, 4th century BC, one of the world's
Nāgarī script (513 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
developing Sanskrit Nāgarī script in ancient India is from the 1st to 4th century CE inscriptions discovered in Gujarat. The Nāgarī script was in regular
Phrataphernes (386 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Phrataphernes (Ancient Greek: Φραταφέρνης; lived 4th century BC) was a Persian who held the government of Parthia and Hyrcania, under the king Darius
Sicani (610 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Sicani (Greek Σικανοί Sikanoi) or Sicanians were one of three ancient peoples of Sicily present at the time of Phoenician and Greek colonization. The
Roman Catholic Diocese of Toul (843 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The Diocese of Toul was a Roman Catholic diocese seated at Toul in present-day France. It existed from 365 until 1824. From 1048 until 1552 (de jure until
Leonnatus (280 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Leonnatus (Greek: Λεοννάτος; 356 BC – 322 BC) was a Macedonian officer of Alexander the Great and one of the diadochi. He was a member of the royal house
Ada of Caria (603 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
House of Hecatomnus (the Hecatomnids) and ruler of Caria during the mid-4th century BC, first as Persian Satrap and later as Queen under the auspices of
Monimus (367 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Monimus (/ˈmɒnɪməs/; Greek: Μόνιμος; 4th century BC) of Syracuse, was a Cynic philosopher who endorsed philosophical skepticism, denying that there was
Valerius Severus (466 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Flavius Valerius Severus (died September 307), also Severus II, was a Roman emperor from 306 to 307. After failing to besiege Rome, he fled to Ravenna
Mohrael (576 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Mohrael is a Coptic Saint and Martyr. She was martyred in the 4th century AD at the age of 12 years. St. Mohrael came from a pious family. Abbouna
Saint Menas (1,845 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Zeno, but archaeologists have dated the original foundation to the late 4th century. According to the Zeno version, his daughter was leprous and his advisors
Hecataeus of Abdera (493 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was a Greek historian and Pyrrhonist philosopher who flourished in the 4th century BC. Diogenes Laërtius (ix.61) relates that he was a student of Pyrrho
Classical Greece (8,933 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
he had made. Agesilaus came to power by accident at the start of the 4th century BC. This accidental accession meant that, unlike the other Spartan kings
Abāmūn of Tarnūt (289 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Saint Abamun of Tarnut Martyr Born 4th century Tarnut, Egypt Died 372 Alexandria, Egypt Venerated in Oriental Orthodoxy (Coptic Orthodox Church) Eastern
Porta San Paolo (356 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
general Belisarius (530s–540s). The structure is due to Maxentius, in the 4th century, but the two towers were heightened by Honorius. Its original — Latin
Marcellus Empiricus (4,507 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in 4th century Gaul under threat of the Visigoths. On the interpenetration of Christianity and traditional religion and culture in the 4th century, see
Taxiles (803 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Taxiles (in Greek Tαξίλης or Ταξίλας; lived 4th century BC) was the Greek chroniclers' name for the prince (later king) who reigned over the tract between
Eubulides (736 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Eubulides of Miletus (Ancient Greek: Εὐβουλίδης; fl. 4th century BCE) was a philosopher of the Megarian school, and a pupil of Euclid of Megara. He is
Pāṇini (7,315 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Sanskrit: पाणिनि) (pronounced [paːɳɪnɪ], variously dated between fl. 4th century BCE and "6th to 5th century BCE") was an ancient Sanskrit philologist
Antipater II of Macedon (118 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Antipater II of Macedon (Greek: Ἀντίπατρος Βʹ ὁ Μακεδών), was the son of Cassander and Thessalonike of Macedon, who was a half-sister of Alexander the
Emperor Richū (774 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Emperor Richū (履中天皇, Richū-tennō), also known as Ōenoizahowake no Mikoto (大兄去来穂別尊) was the 17th legendary Emperor of Japan, according to the traditional
Hakor (941 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Hakor or Hagar, also known by the hellenized forms Achoris or Hakoris, was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh of the 29th Dynasty. His reign marks the apex of
Antipope Felix II (777 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Antipope Felix, an archdeacon of Rome, was installed as Pope in AD 355 after the Emperor Constantius II banished the reigning Pope, Liberius, for refusing
Theodore of Mopsuestia (3,756 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cilicia Secunda, of which the metropolitan see was Anazarbus. In the 4th century it was of some importance, famous for its bridge, thrown over the Pyramus
Gothic alphabet (1,092 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
writing the Gothic language. Ulfilas (or Wulfila) developed it in the 4th century AD for the purpose of translating the Bible. The alphabet essentially
Arshak II (1,415 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Arshak II (Armenian: Արշակ Բ, flourished 4th century, died 369 or 370), also known as Arsaces II and Arsak II was a prince who was a Roman client king
Philiscus of Aegina (231 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Φιλίσκος Αἰγινήτης; fl. 4th century BC) was a Cynic philosopher from Aegina who lived in the latter half of the 4th century BC. He was the son of Onesicritus
Onuphrius (1,479 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Egyptian origin in the Upper Thebaid, may refer to Paphnutius of Scetis, a 4th-century abbot of Lower Egypt, rather than Paphnutius the Ascetic. "But Paphnutius
Pausanias of Sparta (799 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pausanias (Greek: Παυσανίας) was the Agiad King of Sparta; the son of Pleistoanax. He ruled Sparta from 445 BC to 426 BC and again from 408 BC to 395 BC
Alaric I (6,533 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Alaric I (/ˈælərɪk/; Gothic: Alareiks, 𐌰𐌻𐌰𐍂𐌴𐌹𐌺𐍃, "ruler of all"; Latin: Alaricus; 370 (or 375) – 410 AD) was the first king of the Visigoths, from
Koine Greek phonology (8,579 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
here as it prefigures several traits of later Koine phonology. By the 4th century BC, Boeotian had monophthongized most diphthongs, and featured a fricative
Kalpa Sūtra (305 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mahavira. Traditionally ascribed to Bhadrabahu, which would place it in the 4th century BCE, it was probably put in writing 980 or 993 years after the Nirvana
Euhemerus (1,199 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Euhemerus (/juːˈhiːmərəs, -hɛm-/; also spelled Euemeros or Evemerus; Ancient Greek: Εὐήμερος Euhēmeros, "happy; prosperous"; late fourth century BC) was
Misis Bridge (244 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Misis Bridge Misis Bridge is a Roman bridge in Adana Province, Turkey. (Misis is the popular name of Yakapınar town, which is now included in Greater Adana)
Helmet of Iron Gates (945 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
de la Porțile de Fier) is a Geto-Dacian silver helmet dating from the 4th century BC, housed in the Detroit Institute of Arts, United States. It probably
Pharnabazus III (850 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pharnabazus III (in Greek Φαρνάβαζος; c. 370 BC - after 320 BC) was a Persian satrap who fought against Alexander the Great. His father was Artabazus II
Tithraustes (166 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tithraustes was the Persian satrap of Sardis for several years in the early 4th century BC. Due to scanty historical records, little is known of the man or his
Autophradates (669 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Autophradates (Greek: Aὐτoφραδάτης, Persian: Vadfradad, lived 4th century BC) was a Persian Satrap of Lydia, who also distinguished himself as a general
Xenocrates (3,447 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Xenocrates (/zəˈnɒkrəˌtiːz/; Greek: Ξενοκράτης; c. 396/5 – 314/3 BC) of Chalcedon was a Greek philosopher, mathematician, and leader (scholarch) of the
Tiribazus (596 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Western Asia Satrap of the Achaemenid Period. Probably Tiribazos. Early 4th century BC. Coinage of Tiribazos. Klazomenai mint. Garsoïan, ‘The Emergence’
Confessions (Augustine) (3,342 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article
Confessions (Latin: Confessiones) is an autobiographical work by Saint Augustine of Hippo, consisting of 13 books written in Latin between AD 397 and 400