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searching for 1764 515 found (16967 total)

Battle of Buxar (767 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article

The Battle of Buxar was fought on 22 October 1764, between the forces under the command of the British East India Company, led by Hector Munro, and the
Canada under British rule (4,432 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
maint: multiple names: authors list (link) CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link); 707pp The Quebec Gazette – first periodical in Canada – since 1764
British occupation of Manila (2,834 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and the nearby principal port of Cavite for twenty months between 1762 and 1764. The British wanted to use Manila as an entrepôt for trade in the region
Currency Act (1,571 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
their use for private debts (e.g. for paying merchants). The Currency Act 1764 (4 Geo. III c. 34) extended the 1751 Act to all of the British colonies of
Province of Quebec (1763–1791) (973 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Murray called into the council from 1764 to 1766: List of councillors under Carleton from 1766 to 1774: Around 1763 to 1764 the province was divided into two
Hartford Courant (2,314 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tribune Publishing. The Connecticut Courant began as a weekly on October 29, 1764, started by Thomas Green. The word "courant", borrowed from the French (possibly
1764 English cricket season (320 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1764 English cricket season was the 21st season following the earliest known codification of the Laws of Cricket. Details have survived of seven eleven-a-side
List of Acts of the Parliament of Great Britain, 1760–1779 (8,148 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Roads Act 1764 c. 61 Portsea Improvement Act 1764 c. 92 Rochdale to Burnley Road Act 1764 c. 68 Salop Roads Act 1764 c. 70 Salop Roads Act 1764 c. 81 Samford
Quartering Acts (1,879 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
provide for the quartering of British regulars, but it expired on January 2, 1764, The result was the Quartering Act 1765, which went far beyond what Gage
Cossack Hetmanate (6,258 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Zaporoviensis), was a Cossack host in the region of Central Ukraine between 1648 and 1764 (or until 1782 according to some sources). The Hetmanate was founded by the
Gardner, Massachusetts (2,342 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Named in honor of Col. Thomas Gardner, the community was first settled in 1764 and officially incorporated as a town in 1785 after receiving land grants
St. Louis (13,203 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Louis was founded in 1764 by French fur traders Pierre Laclède and Auguste Chouteau, and named after Louis IX of France. In 1764, following France's defeat
Ivan VI of Russia (1,134 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Иоанн Антонович; 23 August [O.S. 12 August] 1740 – 16 July [O.S. 5 July] 1764) was Emperor of Russia in 1740–41. He was only two months old when he was
Belmonte, Bahia (99 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The municipality covers a total area of 2016.85 km² and was founded in 1764. The municipality contains part of the 100,646 hectares (248,700 acres) Canavieiras
Talcahuano (1,008 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the country. The official foundation date of Talcahuano is 5 November 1764 when Antonio Guill y Gonzaga declared it an official port. However, the site
1766 English cricket season (261 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
The 1766 English cricket season was the 23rd season following the earliest known codification of the Laws of Cricket. Details have survived of three eleven-a-side
1785 English cricket season (180 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1785 English cricket season was the 14th after matches have been first awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The season saw no top-class
1765 English cricket season (249 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1765 English cricket season ← 1764 1766 →
Jean-François Varlet (365 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jean-François Varlet (1764, Paris – 1837) was a leader of the Enragé faction in the French Revolution. Born in Paris on 14 July 1764 into a family of the
Millersville, Pennsylvania (679 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Millersville is a borough in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 8,168. Millersville is located at 40°0′22″N
Lincoln, New Hampshire (1,217 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
respectively, which are now within the White Mountain National Forest. In 1764, Colonial Governor Benning Wentworth granted 32,456 acres (131.34 km2) to
1784 English cricket season (159 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1784 English cricket season was the 13th in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecard of only one first-class
1770 English cricket season (223 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1770 English cricket season was the 27th season following the earliest known codification of the Laws of Cricket. Details have survived of four eleven-a-side
Meiwa (691 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from June 1764 through November 1772. The reigning empress and emperor were Go-Sakuramachi-tennō (後桜町天皇) and Go-Momozono-tennō (後桃園天皇). 1764 Meiwa gannen
Sanderling (1,348 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sanderling was described by the German naturalist Peter Simon Pallas in 1764 and given the binomial name Trynga alba. The sanderling is one of the species
Benjamin Adams (politician) (306 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Adams (December 16, 1764 – March 28, 1837) was an American lawyer and politician. Adams was born in Mendon, Massachusetts in 1764. Benjamin Adams grew
Governor-General of the Philippines (1,464 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1565–1898) and the United States (1898–1946), and briefly by Great Britain (1762–1764) and Japan (1942–1945). They were also the representative of the executive
Little grebe (914 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
little grebe was described by the German naturalist Peter Simon Pallas in 1764 and given the binomial name Colymbus ruficollis. The tricolored grebe was
Little Russia Governorate (1764–1781) (134 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Губернiя) or Government of Malorossiya was created by Russian authorities in 1764–65 after the abolition of Cossack Hetmanate in Ukrainian lands incorporated
Puerto Soledad (949 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
settlement was established as a French colony under the name Port Saint Louis in 1764, and within a year reached a population of 75 (most of them Acadians), with
1772 English cricket season (398 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1772 English cricket season was the 29th season following the earliest known codification of the Laws of Cricket and the first in which matches have
1780 English cricket season (375 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1780 English cricket season was the ninth in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of four first-class
Brunswick County, North Carolina (1,281 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
filming location for many movies and TV shows. The county was formed in 1764 from parts of Bladen County and New Hanover County. It was named for the
1786 English cricket season (282 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1786 English cricket season was the 15th after matches have been first awarded retrospective first-class cricket status and the last before the Marylebone
1783 English cricket season (199 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1783 English cricket season was the 12th in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of four first-class
Richard Stockton (U.S. senator) (396 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Richard Stockton (April 17, 1764 – March 7, 1828) was a lawyer who represented New Jersey in the United States Senate and later served in the United States
1779 English cricket season (296 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1779 English cricket season was the eighth in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of five first-class
1781 English cricket season (234 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1781 English cricket season was the 10th in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of six first-class
Richard Osbaldeston (155 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Richard Osbaldeston (1691–1764) was a Church of England clergyman and Bishop of London from 1762 to 1764. He was born at Hunmanby in Yorkshire, a younger
1768 English cricket season (355 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
The 1768 English cricket season was the 25th season following the earliest known codification of the Laws of Cricket. Details have survived of nine eleven-a-side
Brunswick County, North Carolina (1,281 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
filming location for many movies and TV shows. The county was formed in 1764 from parts of Bladen County and New Hanover County. It was named for the
1782 English cricket season (215 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1782 English cricket season was the 11th in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of four first-class
Carl Fredrik Fallén (348 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Carl Fredrik Fallén (Born 22 September 1764 in Kristinehamn – 26 August 1830) was a Swedish botanist and entomologist. Fallén taught at the Lund University
Claude Victor-Perrin, Duc de Belluno (988 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Claude Victor-Perrin, First Duc de Belluno (7 December 1764 – 1 March 1841) was a French soldier and military commander during the French Revolutionary
1777 English cricket season (460 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1777 English cricket season was the sixth in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of six first-class
Baccarat (company) (649 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
is a subsidiary of the United States company Starwood Capital Group. In 1764 King Louis XV of France gave permission to found a glassworks in the town
1778 English cricket season (284 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1778 English cricket season was the seventh in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of five first-class
Herkimer Home State Historic Site (203 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the Town of Danube, south of the Mohawk River. The home was built in 1764 by Nicholas Herkimer, who died there in 1777 from wounds suffered in the
1767 English cricket season (375 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
The 1767 English cricket season was the 24th season following the earliest known codification of the Laws of Cricket. Details have survived of seven eleven-a-side
Jabez Upham (178 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jabez Upham (August 23, 1764 – November 8, 1811) was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, brother of George Baxter Upham, and cousin of Charles Wentworth
Novorossiya Governorate (754 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Empire in the previously Ottoman and Cossack territories, that existed from 1764 until the 1783 administrative reform. It was created and governed according
1773 English cricket season (437 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1773 English cricket season was the second in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of eight first-class
1776 English cricket season (350 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1776 English cricket season was the fifth in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of seven first-class
1769 English cricket season (506 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
The 1769 English cricket season was the 26th season following the earliest known codification of the Laws of Cricket. Details have survived of 11 eleven-a-side
Peleg Tallman (207 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Peleg Tallman (July 24, 1764 – March 12, 1840) was a United States Representative from Massachusetts. He was born in Tiverton, Rhode Island and attended
Spotted redshank (767 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
spotted redshank was described by German zoologist Peter Simon Pallas in 1764 and given the binomial name Scolopax erythropus. It is a monotypic species
Charlotte County, Virginia (1,643 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the House of Burgesses established and incorporated Charlotte County in 1764 from part of Lunenburg County. The new county was named in honor of Charlotte
Charles Messier (1,213 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
observations journals at Cluny Hotel and at the French Navy observatories. In 1764, Messier was made a fellow of the Royal Society; in 1769, he was elected
1771 English cricket season (722 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1771 English cricket season was the 28th season following the earliest known codification of the Laws of Cricket. Details have survived of 19 eleven-a-side
William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire (1,654 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire, KG, PC (8 May 1720 – 2 October 1764), styled Lord Cavendish before 1729 and Marquess of Hartington between 1729
John Locke (Massachusetts) (267 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
John Locke (February 14, 1764 – March 29, 1855), was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. He was born in Hopkinton, Middlesex County, and attended
Kiev Governorate (1708–64) (774 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Belgorod, becoming a separate province under government of Hetman Apostol. In 1764 there was another division when the government of Little Russia and New Russia
Baní (569 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
He was said to be one of Caonabo's closest allies. But, it wasn't until 1764 when a group of neighbors concerned with their security and safety came together
Church of St. Stephen, Borovo (110 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
church in eastern Croatia. The church was built in the period from 1761 to 1764. Under its patronage was carried out first educational activities in the
Claremont, New Hampshire (3,786 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the country mansion of Thomas Pelham-Holles, Earl of Clare. On October 26, 1764, Colonial Governor Benning Wentworth granted the township to Josiah Willard
Messier 39 (561 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Guillaume Le Gentil in 1749, then Charles Messier added it to his catalogue in 1764. When observed in a small telescope at low power the cluster shows around
Barzillai Gannett (259 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Barzillai Gannett (June 17, 1764 – 1832) was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. Born in Bridgewater, Massachusetts, Gannett was graduated from Harvard
Dalton, New Hampshire (762 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Berlin, NH–VT Micropolitan Statistical Area. Dalton was incorporated in 1764 under the name Chiswick, named for the Duke of Devonshire's castle. The name
Port Louis, Falkland Islands (1,120 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
northeastern East Falkland. It was established by Louis de Bougainville in 1764 as the first French settlement on the islands, but was then transferred to
Semyon Chelyuskin (268 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Semyon Ivanovich Chelyuskin (Russian: Семён Иванович Челюскин) (c. 1700 – 1764) was a Russian polar explorer and naval officer. Chelyuskin graduated from
Stepan Malygin (190 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gavrilovich Malygin (Russian: Степан Гаврилович Малыгин) (died 1 August 1764) was a Russian Arctic explorer. In 1711–1717, Stepan Malygin was a student
Dumbbell Nebula (676 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
object was the first planetary nebula to be discovered; by Charles Messier in 1764. At its brightness of visual magnitude 7.5 and its diameter of about 8 arcminutes
Sarah Allen (missionary) (406 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Sarah Allen (also known as Sara Allen and Mother Allen; née Bass; 1764 – July 16, 1849) was an American abolitionist and missionary for the African Methodist
Messier 29 (533 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
star in the Cygnus constellation. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1764, and can be seen from Earth by using binoculars. The star cluster is situated
Hancock, New Hampshire (1,074 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the proprietors of the lands which became New Hampshire. First settled in 1764, the town was set off from Peterborough and incorporated in 1779, named "Hancock"
HMS Endeavour (8,169 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
on his first voyage of discovery from 1768 to 1771. She was launched in 1764 as the collier Earl of Pembroke, with the Navy purchasing her in 1768 for
William Hogarth (5,295 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
William Hogarth FRSA (/ˈhoʊɡɑːrθ/; 10 November 1697 – 26 October 1764) was an English painter, printmaker, pictorial satirist, social critic, and editorial
Trifid Nebula (666 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
located in Sagittarius. It was discovered by Charles Messier on June 5, 1764. Its name means 'divided into three lobes'. The object is a combination of
Laurent de Gouvion Saint-Cyr (1,194 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Laurent de Gouvion Saint-Cyr, 1st Marquis of Gouvion-Saint-Cyr (13 April 1764 – 17 March 1830) was a French commander in the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic
122nd Regiment of Foot (1762) (48 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
an infantry regiment of the British Army, formed in 1762 and disbanded in 1764. "122nd Regiment of Foot". regiments.org. Archived from the original on 10
Custom House, Lancaster (191 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
architect was Richard Gillow of the Gillow furniture making family. Designed in 1764 for the Port Commissioners, it was used for its original purpose until 1882
123rd Regiment of Foot (1762) (53 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
an infantry regiment of the British Army, formed in 1762 and disbanded in 1764. Its colonel was John Pomeroy. "123rd Regiment of Foot". regiments.org. Archived
Messier 26 (544 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
constellation of Scutum. It was discovered by Charles Messier on June 20, 1764. This 8th magnitude cluster is a challenge to find with typical binoculars
James Murray, 2nd Duke of Atholl (729 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
James Murray, 2nd Duke of Atholl KT PC (28 September 1690 – 8 January 1764), styled Marquess of Tullibardine between 1715 and 1746, was a Scottish peer
121st Regiment of Foot (1762) (48 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
an infantry regiment of the British Army, formed in 1762 and disbanded in 1764. "121st Regiment of Foot". regiments.org. Archived from the original on 14
120th Regiment of Foot (1763) (48 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Army, formed in 1763 by regimenting independent companies and disbanded in 1764. 120th Regiment of Foot (Archived April 16, 2007, at the Wayback Machine)
William Pinkney (668 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
William Pinkney (March 17, 1764 – February 25, 1822) was an American statesman and diplomat, and was appointed the seventh U.S. Attorney General by President
Newington, New Hampshire (1,088 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
considered one of the oldest in the America. The town would be incorporated in 1764 by Colonial Governor Benning Wentworth. In 1794, a bridge was completed across
Spotted flycatcher (1,186 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
flycatcher was described by the German naturalist Peter Simon Pallas in 1764 and given the binomial name Motacilla striata. The genus name Muscicapa comes
Boothbay, Maine (1,342 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Townshend, this settlement survived and was incorporated November 3, 1764. It was renamed Boothbay in 1842 after the hamlet of Boothby, which is located
Little tern (802 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
birds in Vroeg's catalogue, 1764". Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections. 47: 332–341 [339]. Includes a transcript of the 1764 text. Rookmaaker, L.C.; Pieters
Messier 30 (799 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Capricornus. It was discovered by the French astronomer Charles Messier in 1764, who described it as a circular nebula without a star. In the New General
Messier 18 (635 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in the constellation Sagittarius. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1764 and included in his list of comet-like objects. From the perspective of Earth
Winnecke 4 (464 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the constellation Ursa Major. WNC 4 was discovered by Charles Messier in 1764 while he was searching for a nebula that had been reported in the area by
David Bellhouse (369 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
David Bellhouse (1764–1840) was an English builder who did much to shape Victorian-era Manchester, both physically and socially. Born in Leeds, Bellhouse
Richard Terrick (260 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
England clergyman who served as Bishop of Peterborough 1757–1764 and Bishop of London 1764–1777. Terrick was born in York, the eldest son of Samuel Terrick
1774 English cricket season (764 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
The 1774 English cricket season was the third in which matches have been awarded retrospective first-class cricket status. The scorecards of five first-class
Lyndeborough, New Hampshire (799 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Country United States State New Hampshire County Hillsborough Incorporated 1764 Villages Lyndeborough South Lyndeborough Government  • Board of Selectmen
Hermitage Museum (6,351 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Petersburg, Russia. The second-largest art museum in the world, it was founded in 1764 when Empress Catherine the Great acquired an impressive collection of paintings
Piermont, New Hampshire (1,018 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and Kingswood Camp for Boys. Incorporated by Governor Benning Wentworth in 1764 and settled in 1768, the town takes its name from Italy's Piedmont. It had
Franconia, New Hampshire (1,297 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Appalachian Trail crosses the southern part. The town was first granted in 1764 by Colonial Governor Benning Wentworth as Franconia, a name widely applied
Return J. Meigs Jr. (775 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Return Jonathan Meigs Jr. (/ˈmɛɡz/; November 17, 1764 – March 29, 1825) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio. He served as the fourth Governor
Hohenlohe-Langenburg (418 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1701-1715 (1659-1715) Louis, Count 1715-1764 (1696-1765); raised to Prince Jan 7, 1764 Louis, 1st Prince 1764-1765 (1696-1765) Christian Albert, 2nd Prince
Jack snipe (712 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
 minimus Binomial name Lymnocryptes minimus (Brunnich, 1764) Range of L. minimus     Breeding      Non-breeding Synonyms Scolopax minima Brünnich, 1764
Messier 9 (646 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The cluster was discovered by French astronomer Charles Messier on June 3, 1764, who described it as a "nebula without stars". In 1783, English astronomer
The Club (dining club) (1,307 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The Club or Literary Club is a London dining club founded in February 1764 by the artist Joshua Reynolds and essayist Samuel Johnson, with Edmund Burke
Alexander Mackenzie (238 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Alexander Mackenzie most commonly refers to: Alexander Mackenzie (explorer) (1764–1820), explorer and commercial partner of the North West Company Alexander
John Caesar (1,077 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
John Caesar (1764 – 15 February 1796), nicknamed "Black Caesar", was the first Australian bushranger and one of the first people of African descent to
Daniel Rodney (728 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Daniel Rodney (September 10, 1764 – September 2, 1846) was an American merchant and politician from Lewes in Sussex County, Delaware. He was a member of
Heinrich Grenser (191 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Johann Heinrich Wilhelm Grenser (5 March 1764 – 12 December 1813) was a German musical instrument maker. From 1779 to 1786 he was apprenticed to his uncle
Jean-Philippe Rameau (6,373 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rameau (French: [ʒɑ̃filip ʁamo]; (1683-09-25)25 September 1683 – (1764-09-12)12 September 1764) was one of the most important French composers and music theorists
Nabal (Handel) (69 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
was compiled from the works of Handel in 1764 by John Christopher Smith. It was first performed on 16 March 1764 at Covent Garden, London. The recitatives
Nathaniel Cowdry House (292 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
historic house at 71 Prospect Street in Wakefield, Massachusetts. Built about 1764, it is one of Wakefield's oldest buildings, built by a member of the locally
George Stone (bishop) (895 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
George Stone (1708 – 19 December 1764) was the Church of Ireland Archbishop of Armagh (Primate of All Ireland) from 1747 to his death. Born in London,
Charlottetown (4,113 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the site for the county seat of Queens County in the colonial survey of 1764 by Captain Samuel Holland of the Royal Engineers. A year later, Charlottetown
Madame de Pompadour (4,507 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(/ˈpɒmpədʊər/, French: [pɔ̃paduʁ] (listen); 29 December 1721 – 15 April 1764), commonly known as Madame de Pompadour, was a member of the French court
Manuel Rojo del Río y Vieyra (360 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Manuel Antonio Rojo del Río y Vieyra (September 24, 1708 – January 30, 1764) was a Mexican (originally Spanish Criollo) friar who served as the 16th Archbishop
José Gervasio Artigas (2,634 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Arnal (Spanish pronunciation: [xoˈse ɣeɾˈβa.sjo aɾˈti.ɣas aɾˈnal]; June 19, 1764 – September 23, 1850) was a national hero of Uruguay, sometimes called "the
Abbeville, South Carolina (2,349 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
town of the same name. Abbeville was established by French Huguenots in 1764, at a site named by John de la Howe. It was incorporated in 1840. Famed states'
James Burrough (architect) (734 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Sir James Burrough (1 September 1691 – 7 August 1764) was an English academic, antiquary, and amateur architect. He was Master of Gonville and Caius College
The Traveller (poem) (1,880 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The Traveller; or, a Prospect of Society (1764) is a philosophical poem by Oliver Goldsmith. In heroic verse of an Augustan style it discusses the causes
Winchendon, Massachusetts (2,182 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1690 expeditions against Canada. Winchendon was officially incorporated in 1764, named after Nether Winchendon, Buckinghamshire, England, which itself was
George Byng (1764–1847) (438 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
George Byng DL JP (17 May 1764 – 10 January 1847), of Wrotham Park in Middlesex (now Hertfordshire), and of Wentworth House, 5, St James's Square, London
Samuel L. Mitchill (1,003 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Latham Mitchill (August 20, 1764 – September 7, 1831) was an American physician, naturalist, and politician who lived in Plandome, New York. Samuel
Johann Wilhelm Meigen (3,612 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Johann Wilhelm Meigen (3 May 1764 – 11 July 1845) was a German entomologist famous for his pioneering work on Diptera. Meigen was born in Solingen, the
John Dubois (1,184 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
born Bishop of New York. Dubois was born in Paris, France, on August 24, 1764. After theological studies at the Oratorian Seminary of Saint-Magloire in
Alexander Mackenzie (explorer) (1,882 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Alexander Mackenzie (or MacKenzie, Scottish Gaelic: Alasdair MacCoinnich; 1764 – 12 March 1820) was a Scottish explorer known for accomplishing the first
Messier 19 (629 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
constellation Ophiuchus. It was discovered by Charles Messier on June 5, 1764 and added to his catalogue of comet-like objects that same year. It was resolved
Messier 14 (349 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in the constellation Ophiuchus. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1764. At a distance of about 30,000 light-years, M14 contains several hundred
Wey and Godalming Navigations (3,336 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Construction of the Godalming Navigation, a further four locks, was completed in 1764 connecting a second market town. Commercial traffic (save for exceptional
Theophilus III of Alexandria (35 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Theophilus III served as Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Alexandria between 1805 and 1825. "Theophilos II Pankostas (1805–1825)". Official web site of the
Green Mountain Boys (1,797 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Company of Militia in the town of the Bennington, organized October 24, 1764 John J. Duffy, Samuel B. Hand & Ralph H. Orth, The Vermont Encyclopedia –
Charles Philip Yorke (389 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Philip Yorke PC FRS FSA (12 March 1764 – 13 March 1834) was a British politician. He notably served as Home Secretary from 1803 to 1804. He sat
Messier 21 (650 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sagittarius. It was discovered and catalogued by Charles Messier on June 5, 1764. This cluster is relatively young and tightly packed. A few blue giant stars
Fletcher Christian (2,396 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fletcher Christian (25 September 1764 – 20 September 1793) was master's mate on board HMS Bounty during Lieutenant William Bligh's voyage to Tahiti during
Dictionnaire philosophique (1,242 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Philosophical Dictionary) is an encyclopedic dictionary published by Voltaire in 1764. The alphabetically arranged articles often criticize the Roman Catholic
Antoine Roy (1,004 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Antoine Roy (5 March 1764 – 3 April 1847) was a French lawyer and politician. He was a National Representative during the Hundred Days when Napoleon returned
Brown University (12,918 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
private Ivy League research university in Providence, Rhode Island. Founded in 1764 as the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations
Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey (3,188 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, KG, PC (13 March 1764 – 17 July 1845), known as Viscount Howick between 1806 and 1807, was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Brown University (12,918 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
private Ivy League research university in Providence, Rhode Island. Founded in 1764 as the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations
Messier 12 (600 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ophiuchus. It was discovered by the French astronomer Charles Messier on May 30, 1764, who described it as a "nebula without stars". In dark conditions this cluster
Philip Yorke, 1st Earl of Hardwicke (1,808 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Philip Yorke, 1st Earl of Hardwicke, PC (1 December 1690 – 6 March 1764) was an English lawyer and politician who served as Lord High Chancellor of Great
George Johnston (British Marines officer) (1,177 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Lieutenant-Colonel George Johnston (19 March 1764 – 5 January 1823) was briefly Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales, Australia after leading the rebellion
Messier 28 (647 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sagittarius. It was discovered by French astronomer Charles Messier on July 27, 1764. He briefly described it as a "nebula containing no star... round, seen with
Eclipse (horse) (2,431 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
thoroughbred racehorse born 1814 see American Eclipse (racehorse). Eclipse (1 April 1764 – 26 February 1789) was an undefeated 18th-century British Thoroughbred racehorse
Messier 23 (557 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
constellation of Sagittarius. It was discovered by Charles Messier on June 20, 1764. M23 can be found with binoculars or a modestly sized telescope. The cluster
List of windmills in Suffolk (517 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Volume 1. Norwich: The Norfolk Windmills Trust. p. 92. ISBN 0-9509793-0-9. "1764 Ipswich Journal newspaper archive". The Foxearth and District Local History
Lord Lieutenant of Hertfordshire (407 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Clavering-Cowper, 2nd Earl Cowper 8 March 1744 – 18 September 1764 William Capell, 4th Earl of Essex 12 November 1764 – 1771 James Cecil, 1st Marquess of Salisbury 13
Hōreki (520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
before Meiwa. The period spanned the years from October 1751 through June 1764. The reigning emperor and empress were Momozono-tennō (桃園天皇) and Go-Sakuramachi-tennō
Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School (2,647 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Manhattan (5 West 93rd Street), in New York City, New York. It was founded in 1764 by what is now Columbia University in order to properly prepare incoming
Irkutsk Governorate (51 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(a guberniya) of the Russian Empire, located in Siberia. It existed from 1764 to 1926; its seat was in the city of Irkutsk. Coordinates: 52°17′00″N 104°18′00″E
Ann Radcliffe (2,200 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ann Radcliffe (born Ann Ward, 9 July 1764 – 7 February 1823) was an English author and pioneer of Gothic fiction. Her technique of explaining apparently
James Murray (British Army officer, born 1721) (1,262 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
London, 1936. Scott, S. Morley. "Civil and Military Authority in Canada, 1764–17661." Canadian Historical Review 9#2 (1928): 117-136. Wrong, George. Canada
Boquet, Pennsylvania (361 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the site of Fort Pitt, named Boquet's Redoubt. This blockhouse, built in 1764, is commonly considered to be the oldest structure in western Pennsylvania
Quaker Bible (657 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of the Old and New Testament; with notes critical and explanatory, is the 1764 translation of the Christian Bible into English by Anthony Purver (1702–1777)
Athanasius IV Jawhar (808 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Church from 1788 to 1794. He previously claimed to be patriarch from 1759 to 1764 and from 1765 to 1768. Michael Jawhar was born in Damascus on 18 September
Anderson–Capner House (140 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
at 700 Trumbull Avenue in Lawrence Township, New Jersey. Constructed in 1764, it is the last remaining pre-revolutionary building and farm house in the
Pin-tailed whydah (533 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
whydah was first described by the German naturalist Peter Simon Pallas in 1764 and given the binomial name Fringilla macroura. The pin-tailed whydah is
Essex Chronicle (144 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Essex Chronicle is a general news, weekly paper founded in 1764, as the Chelmsford Chronicle, and now owned by Local World, who acquired previous owner
Beast of Gévaudan (2,771 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Haute-Loire), in the Margeride Mountains of south-central France between 1764 and 1767. The attacks, which covered an area spanning 90 by 80 kilometres
Paxton Boys (1,468 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
called the Conestoga Massacre. Following attacks on the Conestoga, in January 1764 about 250 Paxton Boys marched to Philadelphia to present their grievances
Ruddy shelduck (2,001 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tadorna; in the wildfowl family Anatidae. The bird was first described in 1764 by the German zoologist and botanist Peter Simon Pallas who named it Anas
Hohenlohe-Ingelfingen (157 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Hohenlohe-Langenburg. It was raised from a County to a Principality in 1764, and was mediatised to Württemberg in 1806. Christian Kraft, Count of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
1760s in archaeology (329 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The decade of the 1760s in archaeology involved some significant events. 1764: First systematic mapping of the Antonine Wall by William Roy. Formal excavations
German Society of Pennsylvania (366 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the oldest German-culture organization in the United States. Founded in 1764, to aid German immigrants, including those who arrived as indentured servants
George Parker, 2nd Earl of Macclesfield (492 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
George Parker, 2nd Earl of Macclesfield, PRS (c. 1695 or 1697 – 17 March 1764) was an English peer and astronomer. Styled Viscount Parker from 1721 to
Purple sandpiper (535 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Brünnich, 1764) Range of C. maritima      Breeding      Resident      Non-breeding      Passage Synonyms Tringa maritima Brünnich, 1764 Erolia maritima
Thomas Cooper (American politician, born 1764) (475 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Thomas Cooper (1764–1829) was a Delaware lawyer and politician who was a Federalist member of the United States House of Representatives. He served in
Crato, Ceará (351 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the state of Ceará, in the northeast of Brazil. It was founded on June 21, 1764 by the Capuchin friar Carlos Maria de Ferrara. Originally it was a small
East Berlin, Pennsylvania (795 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
adjacent to the York County border and 13 miles (21 km) west of York. In 1764, John Frankenberger purchased and laid out eighty-five lots with streets
Wallendorfer Porzellan (579 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Porcelain is a porcelain manufacturing company which has been in operation since 1764 in Lichte (Wallendorf) in the Thuringian Highlands. Wallendorf is one of
John Coape Sherbrooke (641 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
General Sir John Coape Sherbrooke, GCB (baptised 29 April 1764 – 14 February 1830) was a British soldier and colonial administrator. After serving in the
Nathaniel Bliss (543 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
– 2 September 1764) was an English astronomer of the 18th century, serving as Britain's fourth Astronomer Royal between 1762 and 1764. Nathaniel Bliss
Yellow Mansion, Copenhagen (483 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
changed they were somewhat relaxed. The Yellow Mansion was built from 1759 to 1764 for the merchant Frederik Bargum. The architect was Nicolas-Henri Jardin
Brooks's (2,105 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and Boodle's. The club that was to become Brooks's was founded in March 1764 by twenty-seven prominent Whig nobles including the Duke of Portland, the
1761 to 1765 in sports (513 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
been found. 20 June 1764 — Bill Darts defeated Parfit Meggs, who was the brother of George Meggs at Shepton Mallett. 20 June 1764 — Harry Sellers defeated
Lord Lieutenant of Derbyshire (371 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire 21 January 1756 – 1764 John Manners, Marquess of Granby 23 June 1764 – 1766 Lord George Cavendish 17 June 1766 – 1782 William
List of Star Trek Starfleet starships (2,442 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Constitution NCC-1700 Lead ship of the class (previously NX-1700). USS Defiant NCC-1764 The ship is lost in an interdimensional rift in "The Tholian Web". Later
Charles Townshend, 3rd Viscount Townshend (369 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Townshend, 3rd Viscount Townshend (11 July 1700 – 12 March 1764), known as The Lord Lynn from 1723 to 1738, was a British politician who sat in
Baron Henley (600 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
created Lord Henley, Baron of Grainge, in the County of Southampton. In 1764 he was further honoured when he was made Earl of Northington. On the death
Hetman of Zaporizhian Host (926 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
office was liquidated on the edict of Russian Governing Senate of 17 November 1764. As a head of state, the position was established by Bohdan Khmelnytsky during
Symphony No. 22 (Haydn) (962 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
22 in E♭ major, Hoboken I/22, is a symphony written by Joseph Haydn in 1764, under the auspices of the benign Prince Nikolaus Esterházy. Its nickname
Constitution of 3 May 1791 (11,449 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
gradual introduction of—reforms, beginning with the Convocation Sejm of 1764 and the consequent election that year of Stanisław August Poniatowski as
Johann Mattheson (708 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Johann Mattheson (28 September 1681 – 17 April 1764) was a German composer, singer, writer, lexicographer, diplomat and music theorist. Mattheson was born
Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond (1,339 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Richmond, 4th Duke of Lennox, 4th Duke of Aubigny, KG, PC (9 December 1764 – 28 August 1819) was a Scottish peer, soldier, politician, and Governor
Malachite kingfisher (984 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
kingfisher was described by the German naturalist Peter Simon Pallas in 1764 and given the binomial name Alcedo cristata. The specific epithet cristata
Edward Livingston (2,499 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Livingston (May 28, 1764 – May 23, 1836) was an American jurist and statesman. He was an influential figure in the drafting of the Louisiana Civil
John Mawe (1,043 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mawe (1764 – 26 October 1829) was a British mineralogist who became known for his practical approach to the discipline. Mawe was born in Derby in 1764 to
Gorham, Maine (1,824 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
however, with the 1763 Treaty of Paris. The town was incorporated as Gorham in 1764. It would annex land from Standish in 1831 and 1839, and from Scarborough
Unity, New Hampshire (867 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Wentworth, which led to disputes. The town was incorporated as "Unity" in 1764 after amicable resolutions of the disputes were reached. In the 1790 census
Edward Livingston (2,499 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Edward Livingston (May 28, 1764 – May 23, 1836) was an American jurist and statesman. He was an influential figure in the drafting of the Louisiana Civil
1764 Polish–Lithuanian royal election (717 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
would be most grateful to those who had made him the monarch. On April 11, 1764, Russia and Prussia signed the pact, in which both sides pledged to promote
Holkham Hall (3,718 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to continue for thirty years, until the completion of the great house in 1764. The Palladian style was admired by Whigs such as Thomas Coke, who sought
Stanisław August Poniatowski (7,836 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
February 1798), who reigned as King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania from 1764 to 1795, was the last monarch of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. He remains
Francis Josias, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (410 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (25 September 1697, in Saalfeld – 16 September 1764, in Rodach) was a duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. He was the fourth living
Patcham Place (1,415 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles I's death warrant. It was extended and almost completely rebuilt in 1764, with traces of the older buildings remaining behind the Classical façade
Windsor, Vermont (1,685 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
by colonial governor Benning Wentworth. It was first settled in August 1764 by Captain Steele Smith and his family from Farmington, Connecticut. In 1777
Messier 3 (871 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the northern constellation of Canes Venatici. It was discovered on May 3, 1764, and was the first Messier object to be discovered by Charles Messier himself
Smolny Institute (515 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ivan Betskoy and in accordance with a decree of Catherine II (the Great) in 1764, borrowing its name from the nearby Smolny Convent. The establishment of
History of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (1764–1795) (16,406 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The History of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (1764–1795) is concerned with the final decades of existence of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. The
Joseph Potaski (896 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
new colony of Van Diemens Land.3 It is estimated that Potaski was born in 1764, in Poland. Not much is known of Potaski's early life. It has been suggested
Jacob Radcliff (282 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Radclift (April 20, 1764 – May 6, 1844) was Mayor of New York City from 1810 to 1811, and from 1815 to 1818. He was born on April 20, 1764, in Rhinebeck, Dutchess
Great skua (1,067 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Order: Charadriiformes Family: Stercorariidae Genus: Stercorarius Species: S. skua Binomial name Stercorarius skua Brunnich, 1764 Synonyms Catharacta skua
Carlos Frederico Lecor, Viscount of Laguna (940 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Carlos Frederico Lecor (October 6, 1764 – August 2, 1836) was a Portuguese general and politician. He was the first Baron of Laguna, in Portugal, and later
Dresden Academy of Fine Arts (1,431 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the product of a merger between the famous Dresden Art Academy, founded in 1764, the workplace and training ground of a number of influential European artists
89th (Highland) Regiment of Foot (112 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
with the Army at Patna, they took part in the Battle of Buxar in October 1764. They were disbanded soon afterwards, many of the men joining local East
Department (country subdivision) (313 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
many politicians and thinkers. The earliest known suggestion of it is from 1764 in the writings of d'Argenson. Today, departments may exist either with or
Committees of correspondence (2,268 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
were disbanded. The first formal committee was established in Boston in 1764 to rally opposition to the Currency Act and unpopular reforms imposed on
Symphony No. 24 (Haydn) (217 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Joseph Haydn wrote Symphony No. 24 in D major, Hoboken I/24, in 1764. The work is scored for flute, two oboes, bassoon, two horns, and strings with continuo
Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh (114 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Marriages Death Prince William Henry House of Hanover 1764–1805 also: Earl of Connaught (1764) 25 November 1743 Leicester House son of Frederick, Prince
Henry Bilson-Legge (847 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry Bilson-Legge PC FRS (29 May 1708 – 23 August 1764) was an English statesman. He notably served three times as Chancellor of the Exchequer in the
Battle of Atakpamé (525 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The Battle of Atakpamé (1764) was an armed confrontation between the Ashanti Empire and neighboring Akan Allies under the leadership of the Kingdom of
Élisabeth of France (8,860 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Élisabeth of France (Élisabeth Philippe Marie Hélène de France; 3 May 1764 – 10 May 1794), known as Madame Élisabeth, was a French princess and the youngest
Lawrence's Hotel (314 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Heritage Site, in the Lisbon District of Portugal. Opened by an Englishman in 1764, it is reputedly the oldest, still-functioning, hotel on the Iberian peninsula
Fremont, New Hampshire (938 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
insurrection would be known as the Mast Tree Riot. The town was granted in 1764 by Colonial Governor Benning Wentworth as Poplin. In 1853, Poplin petitioned
Benjamin Outram (1,017 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Benjamin Outram (1 April 1764 – 22 May 1805) was an English civil engineer, surveyor and industrialist. He was a pioneer in the building of canals and
Augustine Washington Jr. (315 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Augustine Washington Jr. (1720–1762) was an American soldier, planter, and politician. He was the second and youngest son of Augustine Washington and Jane
Symphony No. 21 (Haydn) (863 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
21 in A major, Hoboken I/21, was composed by Joseph Haydn around the year 1764. The symphony’s movements have unusual structures that make their form hard
HMS Russell (1764) (361 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 10 November 1764 at Deptford. In 1782, she was commanded by Captain James Saumarez at the
Messier 10 (827 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
object was discovered by the French astronomer Charles Messier on May 29, 1764, who cataloged it as number 10 in his catalogue and described it as a "nebula
Convocation Sejm (1764) (299 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The Convocation Sejm of 1764 was a session of the Sejm (parliament) of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. It took place in Warsaw from 7 May to 23 June
Christian Goldbach (348 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Goldbach (/ˈɡoʊldbɑːk/; German: [ˈɡɔltbax]; March 18, 1690 – November 20, 1764) was a German mathematician who also studied law. He is remembered today
Apaya (88 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Apaya was a king of the Mrauk-U Dynasty of Arakan from 1764 to 1774. Harvey, G. E. (1925). History of Burma: From the Earliest Times to 10 March 1824.
Jacob Stout (698 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jacob Stout (1764 – November 28, 1855) was an American manufacturer and politician from Little Creek Hundred, in Kent County, Delaware. He was a member
Fort Pitt Block House (978 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
building in Point State Park in the city of Pittsburgh. It was constructed in 1764 as a redoubt of Fort Pitt, making it the oldest extant structure in Western
Neresheim Abbey (783 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Imperial Abbey of Neresheim Reichsabtei Neresheim 1764–1802 Status Imperial Abbey Capital Neresheim Abbey Government Principality Historical era Middle
Fatma Sultan (daughter of Mustafa III) (578 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Fatma Sultan (Ottoman Turkish: فاطمہ سلطان‎‎; 8 October 1764 – 7 December 1821) was an Ottoman princess, daughter of Sultan Mustafa III (reign 1757-1774)
Symphony No. 23 (Haydn) (348 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Joseph Haydn wrote Symphony No. 23 in G major, Hoboken I/23, in 1764. The work is scored for 2 oboes, bassoon, 2 horns, and strings with continuo. The
William Pulteney, 1st Earl of Bath (1,575 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
William Pulteney, 1st Earl of Bath, PC (22 March 1684 – 7 July 1764) was an English Whig politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1707 to 1742 when
List of early-modern women poets (UK) (957 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
1759–1857) Anne Killigrew (1660–1685) Caroline Lamb (1785–1828) Mary Lamb (1764–1847) Laetitia Elizabeth Landon (1802–1838) Aemilia Lanier (1569–1645) Mary
Bennelong (2,226 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Woollarawarre Bennelong (c. 1764 – 3 January 1813) (also: "Baneelon") was a senior man of the Eora, an Aboriginal Koori people of the Port Jackson area
Symphony No. 1 (Mozart) (369 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The Symphony No. 1 in E♭ major, K. 16, was written in 1764 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart at the age of eight years. By this time, he was already notable in
Manx shearwater (3,345 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
described by Danish zoologist Morten Thrane Brünnich as Procellaria puffinus in 1764. The current scientific name Puffinus derives from "puffin" and its variants
James Hargreaves (818 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of spinning: Hargreaves is credited with inventing the spinning jenny in 1764; Richard Arkwright patented the water frame in 1769; and Samuel Crompton
Sandy Hook Light (520 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
working lighthouse in the United States. It was designed and built on June 11, 1764 by Isaac Conro. At that time, it stood only 500 feet (150 metres) from the
HMS Plymouth (1708) (122 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
on 2 August 1722. Plymouth remained in service until she was broken up in 1764. Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p168. Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1,
Kirovsk, Luhansk Oblast (481 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
significance. Population: 28,529 (2013 est.). The populated place was founded in 1764 as a village Golubovka by the Russian colonel and a native of Serbia Peter
William Pulteney, 1st Earl of Bath (1,575 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
William Pulteney, 1st Earl of Bath, PC (22 March 1684 – 7 July 1764) was an English Whig politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1707 to 1742 when
List of years in Canada (715 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1754 - 1755 - 1756 - 1757 - 1758 - 1759 1760s: 1760 - 1761 - 1762 - 1763 - 1764 - 1765 - 1766 - 1767 - 1768 - 1769 1770s: 1770 - 1771 - 1772 - 1773 - 1774
Pratap Singh of Jaipur (287 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pratap Singh (2 December 1764 – 1 August 1803) was a Kachwaha ruler of Jaipur from 1778 to 1803. He was born on December 1764 and succeeded his father
Jens Baggesen (681 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jens Immanuel Baggesen (15 February 1764 – 3 October 1826) was a major Danish poet, librettist, critic, and comic writer. Baggesen was born at Korsør on
Ciudad Mante (1,753 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
which according to the testimony of the same Barberena occurred March 8, 1764, at the same time taking an official census of the marketing colonists, and
Jean-Marie Leclair (1,461 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
l'aîné, also known as Jean-Marie Leclair the Elder (10 May 1697 – 22 October 1764), was a Baroque violinist and composer. He is considered to have founded
United Nations Security Council Resolution 1764 (54 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
United Nations Security Council Resolution 1764 was unanimously adopted on 29 June 2007. List of United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1701 to 1800
History of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (1648–1764) (21,157 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The history of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (1648–1764) covers a period in the history of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, from the time
HMS Gloucester (1745) (429 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Succession, capturing four French privateers. The ship was broken up in 1764. Gloucester had a length at the gundeck of 140 feet 8.5 inches (42.9 m) and
Benito Jerónimo Feijóo y Montenegro (478 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
pronunciation: [beˈnito xeˈɾonimo feiˈxoo]; 8 October 1676 – 26 September 1764) was a Spanish monk and scholar who led the Age of Enlightenment in Spain
Sir John Barrow, 1st Baronet (1,743 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir John Barrow, 1st Baronet, FRS, FRGS (19 June 1764 – 23 November 1848) was an English statesman and writer. Barrow was born the only child of Roger
Samuel Whitbread (1764–1815) (410 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Samuel Whitbread (18 January 1764 – 6 July 1815) was a British politician. Whitbread was born in Cardington, Bedfordshire, the son of the brewer Samuel
1812 in France (174 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
poet (born 1764) 22 October – Alexis Joseph Delzons, general (born 1775) 29 October – Emmanuel Maximilien-Joseph Guidal, general (born 1764) 22 December
1764 in literature (863 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
This article is a summary of literary events and publications during 1764. January 19 – John Wilkes is expelled from the British House of Commons for seditious
Thomas Clarke (judge) (439 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Sir Thomas Clarke PC FRS (1703 – 13 November 1764) was a British judge who served as Master of the Rolls. He was the son of a carpenter and a pawnbroker
Flag of Liechtenstein (644 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
blue and red bands charged with a gold crown at the canton. In use since 1764 and officially enshrined into the nation's constitution in 1921, it has been
List of governors of Trois-Rivières (88 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
This article is a list of governors of Trois-Rivières: On August 10, 1764, eighteen months after the signing of the Treaty of Paris, the post of Governor
Johann Friedrich II of Hohenlohe-Öhringen (35 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Johann Friedrich II (1683–1764) was a ruler of the principality of Hohenlohe-Öhringen. The Leopoldina Correspondence Network: Die Korrespondenz der Deutschen
Intolerable Acts (1,757 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of colonial resistance to parliamentary authority that had begun with the 1764 Sugar Act. A fifth act, the Quebec Act, enlarged the boundaries of what was
Théâtre de la Gaîté (boulevard du Temple) (3,559 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Gaîté. The company's theatre on the boulevard du Temple was replaced in 1764 and 1808, and again in 1835 due to a fire. As a result of Haussmann's renovation
Hypolimnas misippus (957 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Savela's Lepidoptera and Some Other Life Forms "Hypolimnas misippus (Linnaeus, 1764)". butterfliesofamerica.com. Retrieved 2018-02-26. One or more of the preceding
Robert Dodsley (1,268 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Robert Dodsley (13 February 1704 – 23 September 1764) was an English bookseller, poet, playwright, and miscellaneous writer. Dodsley was born near Mansfield
1764 in art (345 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Events from the year 1764 in art. February - Joshua Reynolds co-founds The Club with writer Samuel Johnson. Johann Joachim Winckelmann's Geschichte der
Becconsall Old Church (689 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
lane leading to a boatyard on the River Douglas. The church was built in 1764 on the site of a former chantry chapel, which had been built in the 16th century
Gurdon S. Mumford (209 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gurdon Saltonstall Mumford (January 29, 1764 – April 30, 1831) was a United States Representative from New York. Born in New London, Connecticut, he attended
Montpelier (Orange, Virginia) (3,538 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
structure forms the heart of the main house at Montpelier today. Built around 1764, it has two stories of brick laid in a Flemish bond pattern, and a low, hipped
James Henderson Imlay (189 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
James Henderson Imlay (November 26, 1764 – March 6, 1823) was a United States Representative from New Jersey. Born in Imlaystown, he pursued classical
Thomas Adams (British Army officer) (769 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Thomas Adams (1730? – January 1764), British Army major, posthumously promoted to brigadier-general based on accounts of his defence of the British position
Gujranwala City railway station (44 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
32°10′35″N 74°11′14″E / 32.1764°N 74.1871°E / 32.1764; 74.1871Coordinates: 32°10′35″N 74°11′14″E / 32.1764°N 74.1871°E / 32.1764; 74.1871 Owned by Ministry
Ambrose Maréchal (916 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ambrose Maréchal, S.S. (August 28, 1764 – January 29, 1828) was an American Sulpician and prelate of the Roman Catholic Church who served as the third
John Goodricke (944 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
John Goodricke FRS (17 September 1764 – 20 April 1786) was an English amateur astronomer. He is best known for his observations of the variable star Algol
William Elliston (197 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from 1763 to 1764, and 1786 to 1787. Elliston was ordained a priest of the Church of England in 1759 and was Rector of Keyston from 1764 until his death
Slavo-Serbia (384 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
War. The settlers eventually formed the Bakhmut hussar regiment in 1764. Also in 1764, Slavo-Serbia was transformed into the Donets uyezd of Yekaterinoslav
Qurayyat, Hama (68 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
35°10′35″N 36°19′58″E / 35.1764°N 36.3328°E / 35.1764; 36.3328Coordinates: 35°10′35″N 36°19′58″E / 35.1764°N 36.3328°E / 35.1764; 36.3328 Country  Syria
Poniatowski (590 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
family, Stanisław Poniatowski, was elected as King of Poland and reigned from 1764 until his abdication in 1795. Since Polish adjectives have different forms
Growth of Mumbai (165 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Cobbe) 1744: 70,000 (Niebuhr) (large influx of people during the busy season) 1764: 140,000 (Niebuhr), According to Historical account pg 6, pop was 60,000
Francisco Javier de la Torre (182 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Torre was the 49th governor-general of the Philippines from 1764 to 1765. On January 30, 1764, prior to the death of Governor-General Manuel Rojo del Rio
Les Ormes, Vienne (74 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ormes, once the seat of Marc-Pierre de Voyer de Paulmy d'Argenson (1696–1764), Minister of War for Louis XV, is located in the comune. Communes of the
Hetman (983 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
military officer in the hetmanates of Ukraine, the Zaporizhian Host (1649–1764), and the Ukrainian State (1918). The title was used by Ukrainian Cossacks
John Nyren (351 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
John Nyren (15 December 1764 – 30 June 1837) was an English cricketer and author. Nyren made 16 known appearances in first-class cricket from 1787 to 1817
Early American currency (2,485 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
economic activities. The British Parliament passed Currency Acts in 1751, 1764, and 1773 that regulated colonial paper money. During the American Revolution
The Cedars, California (78 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2 km) south-southwest of Donner Pass. It lies at an elevation of 5787 feet (1764 m). U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: The Cedars
Francisco Javier de la Torre (182 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Torre was the 49th governor-general of the Philippines from 1764 to 1765. On January 30, 1764, prior to the death of Governor-General Manuel Rojo del Rio
The Cedars, California (78 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2 km) south-southwest of Donner Pass. It lies at an elevation of 5787 feet (1764 m). U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: The Cedars
John Nyren (351 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
John Nyren (15 December 1764 – 30 June 1837) was an English cricketer and author. Nyren made 16 known appearances in first-class cricket from 1787 to 1817
Sebastiano Conca (746 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sebastiano Conca (8 January 1680 – 1 September 1764) was an Italian painter. He was born at Gaeta, then part of the Kingdom of Naples, and apprenticed
Embreeville, Pennsylvania (202 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
astronomical observation point used by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon in 1764 in surveying the Mason-Dixon line, which lies 15 miles south of the stone
Captaincy General of Cuba (1,995 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rico, Guatemala and Yucatán. The restructuring of the Captaincy General in 1764 was the first example of the Bourbon Reforms in America. The changes included
Pontiac's War (8,426 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the region. Hostilities came to an end after British Army expeditions in 1764 led to peace negotiations over the next two years. The Indians were unable
Coenonympha tullia (408 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
North America. The species was first described by Otto Friedrich Müller in 1764. In alphabetical order: C. t. ampelos (W. H. Edwards, 1871) – northwest common
John Bellenden Ker Gawler (356 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bellenden Ker, originally John Gawler was an English botanist born about 1764 in Ramridge, Andover, Hampshire and died in June 1842 in the same town. On
Jacek Małachowski (151 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
administrator. He was Crown Deputy Master of the Pantry since 1764. Referendary of the Crown in 1764-1780, Deputy Chancellor the Crown since 1780 and Grand Chancellor
History of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569–1648) (14,932 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Polski 1505–1764 (History of Poland 1505–1764), p. 108-109 Józef Andrzej Gierowski – Historia Polski 1505–1764 (History of Poland 1505–1764), p. 60-64
William Barry Grove (403 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
William Barry Grove (January 15, 1764 – March 30, 1818) was a Federalist U.S. Congressman from the state of North Carolina from 1791 to 1803. Grove was
Berbice slave uprising (482 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Accara, and Accabre. The insurgents were eventually defeated in the spring of 1764 with the assistance of troops from neighbouring French and British colonies
Nuneham Courtenay (2,773 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
'new' 1764 church. Old All Saints Church − 1764 Earl Harcourt had the next All Saints parish church, the Old All Saints Church, built in 1764 about 20
Mehmed Said Galip Pasha (62 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mehmed Said Galip Pasha (Modern Turkish: Mehmet Sait Galip Paşa; 1763/1764, Constantinople (Istanbul) – 1829, Balıkesir) was an Ottoman statesman. He was
Arbury Canals (1,495 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
with the Coventry Canal. They were built by Sir Roger Newdigate between 1764 and 1795, and ceased to be used soon after his death in 1806. The Griff Hollows
Rowes Wharf (513 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Battery was extended into the harbor and was defended by thirty-five guns. In 1764, John Rowe bought the land and built the first Rowes Wharf, which extended
Samuel Troilius (272 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Troilius (May 22, 1706 – January 18, 1764) was Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1758 to his death. He was born in Stora Skedvi
Barrett Township, Monroe County, Pennsylvania (883 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Barrett Township is a township in Monroe County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 4,225 at the 2010 census. Two Poconos resort communities
Thomas Addis Emmet (1,481 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Thomas Addis Emmet (24 April 1764 – 14 November 1827) was an Irish and American lawyer and politician. He was a senior member of the revolutionary republican
Brera Astronomical Observatory (231 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
district of Milan, Italy. It was built in the historic Palazzo Brera in 1764 by the Jesuit astronomer Roger Boscovich. Following the suppression of the
Stephen Van Rensselaer (4,653 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Stephen Van Rensselaer III (November 1, 1764 – January 26, 1839) was a New York landowner, businessman, militia officer, and politician. A graduate of
Ralph Allen (1,472 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ralph Allen (1693 – 29 June 1764) was an entrepreneur and philanthropist, and was notable for his reforms to the British postal system. Allen was born
Subalpine warbler (748 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Africa. It was first described by the German naturalist Peter Simon Pallas in 1764 and given the binomial name Montacilla cantillans. The current genus name
Daily Gazetteer (154 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Advertiser from 1 November 1753 until April 1764 The Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser 27 from April 1764 until November 1796 The Gazetteer from November
HMS Triumph (1764) (170 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 3 March 1764 at Woolwich. In 1797, she took part in the Battle of Camperdown, and in 1805
Sagittarius Star Cloud (593 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
approximately 600 light years wide, which was discovered by Charles Messier in 1764. It is sometimes known as the Small Sagittarius Star Cloud to distinguish
Thomas Grosvenor (British Army officer) (710 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Field Marshal Thomas Grosvenor (30 May 1764 – 20 January 1851) was a British Army officer. After serving as a junior officer defending the Bank of England
Ahiman Rezon (880 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
first edition of the Ahiman Rezon was published in 1756, a second one in 1764. By the time the Ancients and Moderns united in 1813, eight editions had
Waldburg-Scheer (41 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Waldburg-Scheer was a partition of Waldburg-Trauchburg, to which it was restored in 1764. Joseph William Eusebius, 1717–56 Leopold Augustus, 1756–64
College of Brown University (452 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Providence, Rhode Island, and the university's oldest school. On March 3, 1764, James Manning and Ezra Stiles filed a charter to create the College of Rhode
1764 Imperial election (154 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The imperial election of 1764 was an imperial election held to select the emperor of the Holy Roman Empire. It took place in Frankfurt on March 27. The
Jonathan Eybeschutz (1,576 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Yonoson יונתן) Eybeschütz (also Eibeschutz or Eibeschitz; 1690 in Kraków – 1764 in Altona), was a Talmudist, Halachist, Kabbalist, holding positions as Dayan
Order of Saint Stephen of Hungary (5,346 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Szent István rend) was an order of knighthood founded by Maria Theresa in 1764. In 1938, Miklós Horthy took the rights and activities of Grand Master as
John Browne (academic) (235 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Dr John Browne D.D. (1687–1764) was an Oxford academic and administrator. He was Fellow and Master of University College, Oxford, and also served as Vice-Chancellor
Suppression of the Society of Jesus (5,752 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The suppression of the Jesuits in the Portuguese Empire (1759), France (1764), the Two Sicilies, Malta, Parma, the Spanish Empire (1767) and Austria and
Shearjashub Bourne (252 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Timothy and Elizabeth Bourne. He graduated from Harvard University in 1764, studied law and became an attorney in Barnstable. He served in local office
Ciudad Bolívar (1,750 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
son Watt Raleigh. The third and present day city was officially founded in 1764 by Don Joacquin Moreno de Mendoza as San Tomas de la Nueva Guayana, Santo
Messier 36 (585 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
re-discovered by Guillaume Le Gentil in 1749, then Charles Messier observed it in 1764 and added it to his catalogue. M36 is at a distance of about 1,330 pc (4
Charles O'Conor (53 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1710–1791), Irish writer, historian, and antiquarian Charles O'Conor (priest) (1764–1828), Irish priest and historian, grandson of the above Charles O'Conor
Prince William Henry, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh (1,133 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Connaught on 19 November 1764. He had been made a Knight of the Garter on 27 May 1762, and invested on 22 September of that year. In 1764 he began to court Maria
Burletta (362 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
performed privately in 1760 near Belfast, and produced at Covent Garden in 1764. The form became debased when the term burletta began to be used for English
Proprietary (247 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Proprietary House, a mansion in New Jersey built for the proprietary governor in 1764 Proprietary lock-in or Vendor lock-in, creating customer dependency on a
Treaty of Fontainebleau (1762) (454 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
to Spain. The cession to Spain was finally revealed in 1764. In a letter dated April 21, 1764, Louis informed the governor, Jean-Jacques Blaise d'Abbadie
Order of Saint Stephen of Hungary (5,346 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Szent István rend) was an order of knighthood founded by Maria Theresa in 1764. In 1938, Miklós Horthy took the rights and activities of Grand Master as
John Barnardiston (40 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
from 1769 to 1778, and the Master of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge from 1764 until 1778. "Barnardiston, John (BNRN737J)". A Cambridge Alumni Database
Devil's coach horse beetle (872 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Staphylinidae). It was originally included in the genus Staphylinus in 1764, and some authors and biologists still use this classification. The Latin
Prince William Henry, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh (1,133 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Connaught on 19 November 1764. He had been made a Knight of the Garter on 27 May 1762, and invested on 22 September of that year. In 1764 he began to court Maria
Khendjer (968 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
absolute dates have been proposed for his reign, depending on the scholar: 1764—1759 BC as proposed by Ryholt and Baker, 1756—1751 BC as reported by Redford
Anthony Cope (Dean of Armagh) (114 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Christianity portal Anthony Cope (1713-1764) was Dean of Armagh from 1753 until his death. Cope was born in Loughgall and educated at Trinity College,
Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire (745 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Marquess of Carnarvon 15 June 1763 – 20 August 1764 Robert Henley, 1st Earl of Northington 20 August 1764 – 6 February 1771 James Brydges, 3rd Duke of Chandos
Stephen Van Rensselaer (4,653 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Stephen Van Rensselaer III (November 1, 1764 – January 26, 1839) was a New York landowner, businessman, militia officer, and politician. A graduate of
Benjamin Barrington (82 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Christianity portal Benjamin Barrington, D.D. (1713-1774) was Dean of Armagh from 1764 to 1768 Cope was born in Dublin and educated at Trinity College, Dublin.
Mathias Sommerhielm (223 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Mathias Otto Leth Sommerhielm (22 August 1764 – 15 November 1827) was a Danish-Norwegian politician who served as Norway's second Prime Minister in Stockholm
List of Justices of the Rhode Island Supreme Court (436 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
This is a list of Associate Justices of the Rhode Island Supreme Court from 1747 to the present. The Justices are listed under the term of the Chief Justice
John Wootton (452 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
John Wootton (c. 1682– 13 November 1764) was an English painter of sporting subjects, battle scenes and landscapes, and illustrator. Born in Snitterfield
Burwell Bassett (298 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Burwell Bassett, Jr. (March 18, 1764 – February 26, 1841) was an American politician from the Commonwealth of Virginia. He served in both chambers of the
Obsolete Polish units of measurement (1,383 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
also dubbed the Warsaw system, introduced by a royal decree of December 6, 1764. The system was later replaced by the New Polish measurement [system] introduced
Graham Moore (Royal Navy officer) (1,081 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Admiral Sir Graham Moore, GCB, GCMG (1764–1843) was a Royal Navy officer. As a junior officer he took part in the Great Siege of Gibraltar during the American
John Byron (2,098 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1768. He circumnavigated the world as a commodore with his own squadron in 1764–1766. He fought in battles in the Seven Years' War and the American Revolution
Edinburgh Advertiser (781 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
published on these days of the week in Edinburgh. It ran from 3 January 1764 until 29 March 1859 when it merged with the Edinburgh Evening Courant. Through
Johann Gottfried Schadow (540 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Johann Gottfried Schadow (20 May 1764 – 27 January 1850) was a German Prussian sculptor. His most iconic work is the chariot on top of the Brandenburg
Esteban Agustín Gazcón (220 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Esteban Agustín Gazcón (July 9, 1764 – June 25, 1824) was a Bolivian-born statesman and lawyer. He was a representative to the Congress of Tucumán which
Simón de Anda y Salazar (625 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
refused to do until the death of Archbishop Rojo, on January 30, 1764. In March 1764, orders were brought from both the King of Britain and the King of
London Evening Post (427 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the assembly in New Jersey, and as mayor of Perth Amboy, before dying in 1764). John Meres (1698-1761, grandson of Sir Thomas Meres) took over management
Rudolph Ackermann (1,062 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Rudolph Ackermann (20 April 1764 in Schneeberg, Electorate of Saxony – 30 March 1834 in Finchley, London) was an Anglo-German bookseller, inventor, lithographer
New Serbia (historical province) (900 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Romanian: Noua Serbie), was a military frontier of Imperial Russia from 1752 to 1764 subordinated directly to the Senat and Military Collegium. The founder of
John Montgomery (Maryland politician) (609 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
John Montgomery (1764 – July 17, 1828) was an American lawyer from Baltimore, Maryland. He represented the sixth district of Maryland in the U.S. Congress
Henry Majendie (400 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Henry William Majendie (1754–1830) was an English Bishop of Chester and Bishop of Bangor. His grandfather André de Majendie was a Huguenot in exile who
Limenitis camilla (503 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Linnaeus, 1764) Subspecies L. c. camilla L. c. japonica Ménétriés, 1857 Synonyms Papilio camilla Linnaeus, 1764 Papilio prorsa Linnaeus, 1764 Papilio sibilla
Fifield Allen (161 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Christianity portal Fifield Allen, DD(1700–1764) was Archdeacon of Middlesex from 6 May 1741 until his death on 26 April 1764. Allen was born in Oxford and educated
Letter bomb (2,233 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
long as the common postal service has been in existence, as far back as 1764 (see Examples). Letter bombs are usually designed to explode immediately
Charles MacCarthy (governor) (1,522 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Sir Charles MacCarthy (born Charles Guérault 15 February 1764 – 21 January 1824) was an Irish-born soldier of French and Irish descent, who later was appointed
Charles Tarrant (161 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Staines, Bloomsbury, Lamberhurst and Wrotham. He was Dean of Carlisle during 1764; and then Dean of Peterborough until his death on 22 February 1791. Alumni
Spinning jenny (1,792 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
industrialization of weaving during the early Industrial Revolution. It was invented in 1764 by James Hargreaves in Stanhill, Oswaldtwistle, Lancashire in England. The
Francesco Algarotti (1,580 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Count Francesco Algarotti (11 December 1712 – 3 May 1764) was a Venetian polymath, philosopher, poet, essayist, anglophile, art critic and art collector
List of cities and towns in New Hampshire (502 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Bennington Hillsborough 1842 1,476 Town meeting Bennington Benton Grafton 1764 364 Town meeting Benton, Boutin Corner, Coventry Berlin Coös 1829/1897 10
Southern hawker (566 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Aeshnidae Genus: Aeshna Species: A. cyanea Binomial name Aeshna cyanea (Müller, 1764) Synonyms Aeshna bicellulata Görtler, 1948 Aeshna atshischgho Bartenef, 1929
Messier 15 (837 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1746 and included in Charles Messier's catalogue of comet-like objects in 1764. At an estimated 12.0 billion years old, it is one of the oldest known globular
French ship Ville de Paris (1764) (399 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
for the navy from the cities and provinces of France. She was completed in 1764 as a 90-gun first rate, just too late to serve in the Seven Years' War. She
Rundāle Palace (808 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Palace. The palace was built in two periods, from 1736 until 1740 and from 1764 until 1768. It is situated at Pilsrundāle, 12 km west of Bauska. In 1735
Zamindars of Bengal (1,475 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Seven Years' War (1756–1763) saw the transformation of events of 1757 to 1764 where European forces were in a struggle to oust the Indian rulers and establish
Expulsion of the Acadians (8,951 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
northern Maine — parts of an area also known as Acadia. The Expulsion (1755–1764) occurred during the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of
Fort Erie, Ontario (2,771 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
territory, including Fort Erie, the first version of which was established in 1764. During the American Revolution Fort Erie was used as a supply depot for
List of 18th-century religious leaders (2,983 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1739–1751) Theophilos, Metropolitan of Turnovo (1751–1764) Parthenios, Metropolitan of Turnovo (1764–1770) Kallinikos, Metropolitan of Turnovo (1770–1791)
Ur-du-kuga (359 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Ur-dukuga, written dur-du6-kù-ga, ca. 1767 BC – 1764 BC (short chronology) or ca. 1830–1828 BC (middle chronology), was the 13th king of the 1st dynasty
Thomas Sewell (357 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
an English judge and Member of Parliament, and Master of the Rolls from 1764 to 1784. Sewell was a member of Middle Temple, called to the bar in 1734
Yair Bridge (267 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
around 1764, with William Mylne acting as both designer and contractor. Its construction was authorised by an Act of Parliament obtained in 1764, for 12
Pietro Locatelli (2,039 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pietro Antonio Locatelli (3 September 1695 in Bergamo – 30 March 1764 in Amsterdam) was an Italian Baroque composer and violinist. Little is known about
Prentiss Mellen (563 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Prentiss Mellen (October 11, 1764 – December 31, 1840) was a lawyer, politician, and jurist from Massachusetts and Maine. Born in Massachusetts and educated
Sir David William Smith, 1st Baronet (440 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Baronet (September 4, 1764 – May 9, 1837) was a soldier and political figure in Upper Canada. He was born in Salisbury, England in 1764. He was the only son
Obe, Afghanistan (62 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Afghanistan. It is located at 34°22′11″N 63°10′35″E / 34.3697°N 63.1764°E / 34.3697; 63.1764 at 1277 m altitude in the valley of the Hari River, northeast
Symphony No. 18 (Haydn) (255 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
it was composed at least a few years before then. Dates between 1757 and 1764 have been suggested. The symphony is scored for 2 oboes, bassoon, 2 horns
Johan August Sandels (275 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Count Johan August Sandels (31 August 1764 – 22 January 1831) was a Swedish soldier and politician, being appointed Governor-general of Norway (Riksståthållare
Sir David William Smith, 1st Baronet (440 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Baronet (September 4, 1764 – May 9, 1837) was a soldier and political figure in Upper Canada. He was born in Salisbury, England in 1764. He was the only son
Samuel Sitgreaves (442 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Sitgreaves (March 16, 1764 – April 4, 1827) was a United States Representative from Pennsylvania. Born in Philadelphia, he pursued classical studies
William Oliver (physician) (1,951 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
William Oliver (14 August [O.S. 4 August] 1695 – 17 March 1764) was a British physician and philanthropist, and inventor of the Bath Oliver. He was born
Obe, Afghanistan (62 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Afghanistan. It is located at 34°22′11″N 63°10′35″E / 34.3697°N 63.1764°E / 34.3697; 63.1764 at 1277 m altitude in the valley of the Hari River, northeast
Juan Vicente Villacorta Díaz (325 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Juan Vicente Villacorta Díaz (January 22, 1764, Zacatecoluca, El Salvador – November 1, 1828, Guatemala) was a Central American politician. From July 10
HMS Robust (443 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 25 October 1764 at Harwich. She was the first vessel of the Royal Navy to bear the name.
Charles Thévenin (446 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Thévenin (12 July 1764 – 28 February 1838) was a neoclassical French painter, known for heroic scenes from the time of the French Revolution and
L'Hospitalet-du-Larzac (197 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
parish center was transferred there. The current parish church dates to 1764, presumably built on top of an older structure. In 1807, the parish was enlarged
Mozart and smallpox (2,021 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
discusses smallpox as it existed in Mozart's time, the decision taken in 1764 by Mozart's father Leopold not to inoculate his children against the disease
European pied flycatcher (4,119 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
hypoleuca ([Pallas], 1764). Ficedula hypoleuca currently has four recognized subspecies: the nominate F. h. hypoleuca ([Pallas], 1764), F. h. speculigera
List of peers 1760–1769 (57 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire 1755 1764 Died William Cavendish, 5th Duke of Devonshire 1764 1811 Duke of Marlborough (1702) George Spencer
Sidney Smith (Royal Navy officer) (3,390 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Admiral Sir William Sidney Smith, GCB, GCTE, KmstkSO, FRS (21 June 1764 – 26 May 1840) was a British naval officer. Serving in the American and French
Novgorod Governorate (1,353 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1760–1761 Grigory Semyonovich Meshchersky, governor; 1761–1764 Stepan Fyodorovich Ushakov, governor; 1764–1776 Yakov Yefimovich Sivers (Jacob Sievers), governor
HMS Ipswich (1694) (220 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
captured, and sank in the bay. Ipswich was hulked in 1757, and broken up in 1764. Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p163. Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1,
Velars-sur-Ouche (40 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the Côte-d'Or department in eastern France. The composer Pierre Desvignes (1764 – 1827) was born in this village. Communes of the Côte-d'Or department INSEE
Erik Pontoppidan (563 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Erik Pontoppidan (August 24, 1698 – December 20, 1764) was a Danish-Norwegian author, a Lutheran bishop of the Church of Norway, an historian, and an antiquarian
Robert Lamb (bishop) (204 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
– 3 November 1769) was an English churchman, bishop of Peterborough from 1764. He was son of Matthew Lamb of London, and nephew of Peniston Lamb, who left
Commentaires sur Corneille (731 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
dramatic works of Pierre Corneille (1608–1684). It was first published in 1764, printed in Geneva in twelve volumes. A second edition, published ten years
John Abernethy (surgeon) (810 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
John Abernethy FRS (3 April 1764 – 20 April 1831) was an English surgeon. He is popularly remembered today for having given his name to the Abernethy biscuit
1764 in architecture (347 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The year 1764 in architecture involved some significant events. Robert Adam's Ruins of the Palace of the Emperor Diocletian at Spalatro in Dalmatia published
HMS Ardent (1764) (594 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Hull according to a design by Sir Thomas Slade, and launched on 13 August 1764 as the first ship of the Ardent-class. She had a somewhat turbulent career
Beaumont, Dublin (558 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
[citation needed] It is the former home of the Guinness family from 1764-1855. The original 1764 lease between Charles Gardiner and Arthur Guinness can still
Princess Maria Carolina of Savoy (665 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Maria Carolina of Savoy (Maria Carolina Antonietta Adelaide; 17 January 1764 – 28 December 1782) was a Princess of Savoy from her birth. She was the youngest
Wallers-en-Fagne (32 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
4°10′35″E / 50.0642°N 4.1764°E / 50.0642; 4.1764Coordinates: 50°03′51″N 4°10′35″E / 50.0642°N 4.1764°E / 50.0642; 4.1764 Country France Region Hauts-de-France
David Daggett (1,248 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
David Daggett (December 31, 1764 – April 12, 1851) was a U.S. senator, mayor of New Haven, Connecticut, Judge of the Connecticut Supreme Court of Errors
Horse Shoe Brewery (945 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
was an English brewery located in central London. It was established in 1764 and became a major producer of porter. It was the site of the London Beer
Mozart family grand tour (6,387 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
record of the children giving a formal concert at Versailles. In February 1764 they were given 50 louis d'or (about 550 florins) and a gold snuff-box by
1764 in music (688 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Every Gentleman and Lady's Beard, Brent and Lowe: Being Songs for the Year 1764 Johann Christian Bach – 6 Keyboard Trios, Op. 2 Joseph Haydn – Symphony no
Western crowned pigeon (487 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
in Vroeg's catalogue, 1764". Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections. 47: 332–341 [334 No. 78]. Includes a transcript of the 1764 text. Rookmaaker, L.C
Arctornis l-nigrum (91 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the family Erebidae. The species was described by Johannes Peter Müller in 1764. It is found in the Palearctic realm and Asia. The wingspan is 35–45 mm.
American pygmy kingfisher (762 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
American pygmy kingfisher was by the German zoologist Peter Simon Pallas in 1764 under the binomial name Alcedo aenea. The specific name aenea is from the
William Mellish (banker) (157 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
William Mellish (c. 1764-1838) was an English Tory politician and banker. He was the third son of William Mellish of Blyth, Nottinghamshire by his second
Suffolk county cricket teams (316 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
is from 1743 and the first mention of a Suffolk representative team is in 1764, with Suffolk playing against Norfolk at Bury St Edmunds racecourse on 23
Duchess Augusta of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (1,163 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (Augusta Caroline Friederika Luise; 3 December 1764 – 27 September 1788) was the first wife of Frederick of Württemberg and the
Skyvatn (121 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
7°10′35″E / 59.6197°N 07.1764°E / 59.6197; 07.1764Coordinates: 59°37′11″N 7°10′35″E / 59.6197°N 07.1764°E / 59.6197; 07.1764 Basin countries Norway
Zaharije Orfelin (1,518 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Novi Sad, 1764. Hristoljubivih dus stihoslovije, Novi Sad, 1764. Sjetovanije naučenogo mladago čelovjeka, 1764. Strasno jevandljelje, Venice, 1764. Pjesn
Henri François Delaborde (589 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Henri-François Delaborde (21 December 1764 – 3 February 1833) was a French general in the French Revolutionary Wars and Napoleonic Wars. He was the son
Pompadour (hairstyle) (1,210 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
The pompadour is a hairstyle named after Madame de Pompadour (1721–1764), a mistress of King Louis XV of France. Despite the name, this hairstyle has nothing
Thessalon First Nation (127 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Crown in the Royal Proclamation of 1763, and in the Treaty of Niagara in 1764. The traditional territory reserved by Thessalon First Nation in the Lake
Benjamin Greene (politician) (155 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Benjamin Greene (May 5, 1764 – October 15, 1837) was an American politician from Maine. Greene spent one term in the Maine House of Representatives in
1764 in science (195 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
The year 1764 in science and technology involved some significant events. Lagrange publishes on the libration of the Moon, and an explanation as to why
Gilbert Tennent (855 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Gilbert Tennent (5 February 1703 – 23 July 1764) was a pietistic Protestant evangelist in colonial America. Born in a Presbyterian Scots-Irish family in
Quebec Chronicle-Telegraph (833 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
founded by William Brown (c. 1737–1789) as the Quebec Gazette on 21 June 1764, is the oldest newspaper in North America. It is currently published as an
Robert Marsh (banker) (70 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Robert Marsh was Governor of the Bank of England from 1762 to 1764. He had been Deputy Governor from 1760 to 1762. He replaced Bartholomew Burton as Governor
Benjamin Henry Latrobe (5,582 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Benjamin Henry Boneval Latrobe (May 1, 1764 – September 3, 1820) was a British-American neoclassical architect who emigrated to the United States. He was
Sir James Shaw, 1st Baronet (1,056 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sir James Shaw, 1st Baronet (26 August 1764 – 22 October 1843), became Lord Mayor of London in 1805. From humble beginnings in a farming family in Ayrshire
Marie-Joseph Chénier (759 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Marie-Joseph Blaise de Chénier (11 February 1764 – 10 January 1811) was a French poet, dramatist and politician of French and Greek origin. The younger
La rencontre imprévue (740 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
this form as La rencontre imprévue at the Burgtheater, Vienna on 7 January 1764. Dancourt's original text, titled Les pèlerins de la Mecque and designated
Kjelvatnet (Ballangen) (70 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
17°10′35″E / 68.1873°N 17.1764°E / 68.1873; 17.1764Coordinates: 68°11′14″N 17°10′35″E / 68.1873°N 17.1764°E / 68.1873; 17.1764 Basin countries Norway
Magnus Beronius (166 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1775 in Uppsala) was Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1764 to his death. He studied in Uppsala for nine years to a master's degree in
Edmund Harrison (785 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Edmund Harrison (1764–1826) was a Virginia politician and member of the Harrison family of Virginia. He represented the counties of Prince George and Amelia
Franklin, Maine (1,006 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2010 census. The town's namesake is Benjamin Franklin. The first settler in 1764, was Moses Butler, for whom Butler's Point is named.{{Citation needed|date=November
Paizay-le-Chapt (118 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
0°10′35″W / 46.0836°N 0.1764°W / 46.0836; -0.1764Coordinates: 46°05′01″N 0°10′35″W / 46.0836°N 0.1764°W / 46.0836; -0.1764 Country France Region Nouvelle-Aquitaine
Percy Jocelyn (776 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Percy Jocelyn (29 November 1764 – 3 September 1843) was Anglican Bishop of Clogher in the Church of Ireland from 1820 to 1822. He was forced from his position
Oglethorpe's Regiment (255 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Press. Foote, William Alfred (1966). The American Independent Companies of the British Army 1664-1764. Thesis - University of California, Los Angeles.
Azim ud-Din II of Sulu (131 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Sultan Azim ud-Din II (reigned 1763–1764, 1778–1791), was the 21st Sultan of Sulu. He was the son of Sultan Bantilan Muizz ud-Din, and cousin to Sultan
Maruthanayagam Pillai (3,123 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Maruthanayagam Pillai (1725 – 15 October 1764) a.k.a. Muhammad Yusuf Khan was born in a Hindu vellalar family, in Panaiyur in British India, in what is
Farm to Market Road 1764 (449 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Farm to Market Road 1764, or FM 1764, is a 13-mile-long (21 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Texas. It is a farm to market road existing entirely
Matsudaira Nobuyori (38 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1746–1779) Sakai Tadayori (1749–1764) Matsudaira Terutaka (1758–1781) Inoue Masatsune (1760–1763) Akimoto Sumitomo (1747–1764, 1765–1767) Abe Masahiro (1837-1857)
Jan Schreuder (59 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Jan Schreuder (12 February 1704 in Hamburg – 16 January 1764 in Batavia, Dutch East Indies) was the 30th Governor of Zeylan during the Dutch period in
Messier 25 (443 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
1745 and it was included in Charles Messier's list of nebulous objects in 1764. The cluster is located near some obscuring features, with a dark lane passing
Ann Hatton (536 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Kemble; other married name Curtis; published as Ann of Swansea) (29 April 1764 – 26 December 1838), was a popular novelist in Britain in the early 19th
Royal elections in Poland (2,118 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
days and could lead to fights and battles. Norman Davies notes that "in 1764, when only thirteen electors were killed, it was said that the Election was
Madame Élisabeth de France (73 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Madame Élisabeth de France (1764–1794) is a painting by Adélaïde Labille-Guiard. It is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The work depicts
Flood (surname) (285 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
and author Warden Flood (1694–1764), Irish judge and politician, MP for Callan 1727–1760, Lord Chief Justice 1760–1764 Warden Flood (1735–1797), Irish
Common carpet (226 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Geometridae. The species was first described by Otto Friedrich Müller in 1764. It is found throughout the Palearctic and the Near East. In North America
1750–1775 in Western fashion (3,674 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
2 – 1756 3 – 1750–60 4 – 1761 5 – 1761 6 – c. 1762 7 – c. 1763 8 – 1764 9 – 1764 10 – 1766 11 – 1766 12 – 1767 13 – 1772 Man's 3-piece suit has coat
Fort Hunter, Pennsylvania (195 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
important position and was used until the termination of all hostilities in 1764. Fort Hunter Park Fort Hunter Mansion The American Historical Register -
List of counties of Prince Edward Island (197 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
including its three counties, dates to a series of surveys undertaken in 1764-65 by Captain Samuel Holland of the British Army's Corps of Royal Engineers
Johann Joachim Winckelmann (3,511 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
sculpture, literature and even philosophy. Winckelmann's History of Ancient Art (1764) was one of the first books written in German to become a classic of European
James DeWolf (1,871 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
James DeWolf (March 18, 1764 – December 21, 1837) was a slave trader, a privateer during the War of 1812, and a state and national politician. He gained
Charles Howard Hodges (493 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Charles Howard Hodges (1764 in Portsmouth – July 24, 1837 in Amsterdam), was a British painter active in the Netherlands during the French occupation of
James Kempt (878 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Waterloo and later became Governor General of Canada. Born in Edinburgh around 1764, he was the son of Gavin Kempt of Batley Hall, Hampshire. Kempt was gazetted
Benjamin Avery (328 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Benjamin Avery, LL.D. (died 1764) was an English physician. Avery was originally a presbyterian minister at Bartholomew Close, London, but quit the ministry
Ulmus × hollandica 'Modiolina' (835 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
'Orme tortillard' first described by Duhamel in De l'exploitation des bois (1764). Poederlé (1774) identified the tree as the 'orme maigre' growing in the
William Yates (college president) (680 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
William Yates, (December 10, 1720 – October 5, 1764) was a clergyman in the Church of England, educator, fifth president of the College of William & Mary
Charles Churchill (satirist) (1,398 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Charles Churchill (February, 1732 – 4 November 1764), was an English poet and satirist. Churchill was born in Vine Street, Westminster. His father, rector
Theophilus Bradbury (226 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
commenced practice in Portland in 1761; moved to Newburyport, Mass., in 1764 and continued the practice of law; member of the State senate 1791-1794;
Abe Masayoshi (31 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1746–1779) Sakai Tadayori (1749–1764) Matsudaira Terutaka (1758–1781) Inoue Masatsune (1760–1763) Akimoto Sumitomo (1747–1764, 1765–1767) Abe Masahiro (1837-1857)
Toda Tadamasa (60 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1746–1779) Sakai Tadayori (1749–1764) Matsudaira Terutaka (1758–1781) Inoue Masatsune (1760–1763) Akimoto Sumitomo (1747–1764, 1765–1767) Abe Masahiro (1837-1857)
Matsudaira Muneakira (25 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1746–1779) Sakai Tadayori (1749–1764) Matsudaira Terutaka (1758–1781) Inoue Masatsune (1760–1763) Akimoto Sumitomo (1747–1764, 1765–1767) Abe Masahiro (1837-1857)
Carl Ditters von Dittersdorf (2,969 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Italian musical scene. In 1764 he traveled to Paris, a trip with only scarce and uncertain documentation. Back in Vienna in 1764, his contract with Count
Matsudaira Norihiro (57 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1746–1779) Sakai Tadayori (1749–1764) Matsudaira Terutaka (1758–1781) Inoue Masatsune (1760–1763) Akimoto Sumitomo (1747–1764, 1765–1767) Abe Masahiro (1837-1857)
Lord Lieutenant of Shropshire (456 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Pulteney, 1st Earl of Bath 13 March 1761 – 7 July 1764 Henry Herbert, 1st Earl of Powis 16 August 1764 – 10 September 1772 Robert Clive, 1st Baron Clive
Basistha Temple (195 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Assam, India, is a Shiva mandir constructed by Ahom King Rajeswar Singha in 1764 along with gift of land 835 Bighas for the ashram. The history of the Basistha
Firmin Didot (530 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Firmin Didot (French: [fiʁmɛ̃ dido]; 14 April 1764 – 24 April 1836) was a French printer, engraver, and type founder. Firmin Didot was born in Paris into
Nikolai Rezanov (2,162 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Petrovich Rezanov (Russian: Николай Петрович Резанов) (28 March [O.S. 8 April] 1764 – 13 March [O.S. 1 March] 1807) was a Russian nobleman and statesman who
Ville-sur-Cousances (30 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
5°10′35″E / 49.0831°N 5.1764°E / 49.0831; 5.1764Coordinates: 49°04′59″N 5°10′35″E / 49.0831°N 5.1764°E / 49.0831; 5.1764 Country France Region Grand
John Gardner (Rhode Island) (680 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
John Gardner (September 17, 1697 - January 1764) served for more than eight years as the deputy governor of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations
Rōjū (1,754 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Tadayori (酒井忠寄)(1749–1764) Matsudaira Terutaka (松平輝高)(1758–1781) Inoue Masatsune (井上正経)(1760–1763) Akimoto Sumitomo (秋元凉朝)(1747–1764, 1765–1767) Matsudaira
Estherton, Pennsylvania (121 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
the zip code of 17110. Estherton was founded as Coxestown, or Coxtown, in 1764 by John Cox Jr. after his wife, Esther.It was the second town laid out in
Atobe Yoshisuke (93 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1746–1779) Sakai Tadayori (1749–1764) Matsudaira Terutaka (1758–1781) Inoue Masatsune (1760–1763) Akimoto Sumitomo (1747–1764, 1765–1767) Abe Masahiro (1837-1857)
Charles Baillie-Hamilton (priest) (180 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Christianity portal The Venerable Charles Baillie-Hamilton (27 November 1764 – 19 June 1820) was an English Anglican priest. He was Archdeacon of Cleveland
103rd Regiment of Foot (Royal Bombay Fusiliers) (1,087 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
during the Seven Years' War. It also fought at the Battle of Buxar in October 1764 during the Oude Campaign. It next saw action at the Siege of Seringapatam
2nd Quebec Legislature (2,342 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Biography, from 1764 to the present: Christian Henry Pozer Quebec National Assembly, Québec Dictionary of Parliamentary Biography, from 1764 to the present:
Nikolai Rezanov (2,162 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Petrovich Rezanov (Russian: Николай Петрович Резанов) (28 March [O.S. 8 April] 1764 – 13 March [O.S. 1 March] 1807) was a Russian nobleman and statesman who
HMS Ranelagh (1697) (239 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
honour of his commander. The Princess Caroline continued in service until 1764, when she was broken up. Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p163. Lavery, Ships
Carl Ditters von Dittersdorf (2,969 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Italian musical scene. In 1764 he traveled to Paris, a trip with only scarce and uncertain documentation. Back in Vienna in 1764, his contract with Count
List of fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1801 (122 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1801. Edmund Antrobus Edward Ash (c.1764–1829) Edward Balme (d. 1823) William Bligh (1754–1817) Richard Chenevix (c
Pinus mugo (892 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Pinus mugo, known as creeping pine, dwarf mountainpine, mugo pine, mountain pine, scrub mountain pine or Swiss mountain pine, is a species of conifer,
Louis Baraguey d'Hilliers (629 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Louis Baraguey d'Hilliers (13 August 1764 – 6 January 1813) was a French Army general who fought in the French Revolutionary Wars and the Napoleonic Wars
James Kempt (878 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Waterloo and later became Governor General of Canada. Born in Edinburgh around 1764, he was the son of Gavin Kempt of Batley Hall, Hampshire. Kempt was gazetted
George Martin (Royal Navy officer) (2,647 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Admiral of the Fleet Sir George Martin GCB, GCMG (1764 – 28 July 1847) was an officer of the Royal Navy who saw service during the American War of Independence
1000 (number) (4,253 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
prime 1756 – centered pentagonal number 1760 – the number of yards in a mile 1764 – 422 1770 – triangular number, hexagonal number, Town of Seventeen Seventy
Tairō (185 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1746–1779) Sakai Tadayori (1749–1764) Matsudaira Terutaka (1758–1781) Inoue Masatsune (1760–1763) Akimoto Sumitomo (1747–1764, 1765–1767) Abe Masahiro (1837-1857)
Thomas Patterson (Pennsylvania politician) (140 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Thomas Patterson (October 1, 1764 – November 16, 1841) was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. Thomas Patterson (half brother
On Crimes and Punishments (1,554 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
deˈlitti e ddelle ˈpeːne]), is a treatise written by Cesare Beccaria in 1764. The treatise condemned torture and the death penalty and was a founding
Józef Sylwester Sosnowski (114 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Lithuania (1764–71), Field Hetman of Lithuania (1775–80), a delegate to the Convocation Sejm of 1764, and Marshall of the Electoral Sejm of 1764. Sosnowski
Stamp Act 1765 (9,941 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
nearly doubled, rising from £72,289,673 in 1755 to almost £129,586,789 by 1764. Post-war expenses were expected to remain high because the Bute ministry
Joseph McKean (373 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Joseph Borden McKean (July 28, 1764–September 3, 1826) was a distinguished Philadelphia lawyer and judge. He served as state Pennsylvania Attorney General
Ulmus × hollandica 'Modiolina' (835 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
'Orme tortillard' first described by Duhamel in De l'exploitation des bois (1764). Poederlé (1774) identified the tree as the 'orme maigre' growing in the
Pierre Laclède (1,067 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
with his young assistant and stepson Auguste Chouteau, founded St. Louis in 1764, in what was then Spanish Upper Louisiana, in present-day Missouri. Laclède
Elisha Reynolds Potter (243 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Elisha Reynolds Potter (November 5, 1764 – September 26, 1835) was a statesman in the Federalist Party from Kingston, Rhode Island, who served several
Avicennia germinans (594 words) [view diff] no match in snippet view article find links to article
Avicennia germinans, the black mangrove, is a shrub in the acanthus family, Acanthaceae. It grows in tropical and subtropical regions of the Americas,
William Ellery Sr. (279 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
William Ellery Sr. (31 October 1701 – 15 March 1764) was a merchant and politician in the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations during the
Lot 3, Prince Edward Island (100 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
township in Prince County, Prince Edward Island, Canada created during the 1764–1766 survey of Samuel Holland. It is part of North Parish. 899 (2006 census)
List of Classical-era composers (3,736 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1763–1821) Matthew Camidge (1764–1844) Franz Lauska (1764–1825) Valentino Fioravanti (1764–1837) Helene de Montgeroult (1764–1836) John Addison (c. 1765–1844)
Weakley County, Tennessee (978 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
on October 21, 1823, and is named for U. S. Congressman Robert Weakley (1764–1845). Weakley County comprises the Martin, TN Micropolitan Statistical Area
Samuel Henderson (113 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Samuel Henderson (November 27, 1764 – November 17, 1841) was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. Samuel Henderson was born
René Louis de Voyer de Paulmy d'Argenson (1,027 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
to January 1747. His younger brother, Marc-Pierre, Comte d'Argenson (1696-1764), was Minister of War from 1743 to 1747. René-Louis de Voyer de Paulmy was
Holderness Drain (3,751 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
River Hull in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. Construction began in 1764, and several notable civil engineers were involved with the scheme over the
List of butterflies of Lesotho (465 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(Godart, 1819) Colotis evenina (Wallengren, 1857) Pontia helice (Linnaeus, 1764) Belenois aurota (Fabricius, 1793) Thestor basutus (Wallengren, 1857) Chrysoritis
Charaxes varanes (531 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
torbeni Turlin, 1999 – (Yemen) Perhaps full species C. v. varanes (Cramer, 1764) – (southern Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland) C. v. vologeses (Mabille
Citril finch (1,161 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
finch was formally described by the German zoologist Peter Simon Pallas in 1764 under the binomial name Fringilla citrinella. The current genus name Carduelis
Henry Woods (Pennsylvania) (171 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Henry Woods (1764–1826) was an American politician, a United States Representative from Pennsylvania, and a land speculator. Born in Bedford, Pennsylvania
Sir Graham Moore Islands (Nunavut) (101 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Islands, Lawford Islands, and Leo Islands. Vice-Admiral Sir Graham Moore (1764–1843) was a British career officer in the Royal Navy. "Sir Graham Moore Islands"
Cudjoe (1,036 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
Cudjoe, Codjoe or Captain Cudjoe (c. 1690s – 1764), sometimes spelled Cudjo - corresponding to the Akan day name Kojo, Codjoe or Kwadwo - was a Maroon
Symphony No. 7 (Michael Haydn) (162 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Symphony No. 7 in E major, Perger 5, Sherman 7, MH 65, written in Salzburg in 1764, is one of the few symphonies in E major written in the 18th century, and
Lot 4, Prince Edward Island (102 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
township in Prince County, Prince Edward Island, Canada created during the 1764–1766 survey of Samuel Holland. It is part of Egmont Parish. Incorporated
Parson Smith House (370 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
House is a historic house on River Road in southern Windham, Maine. Built in 1764 and virtually unaltered since, it is one of the state's finest examples of
House of Burgesses (3,217 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
of 1764 in Imperial-Colonial Relations, 1764–1776". The William and Mary Quarterly. 3. 18 (4): 485–518. "America During the Age of Revolution, 1764–1775"
William Ellery (661 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Rhode Island. In 1764, the Baptists consulted with Ellery and Congregationalist Reverend Ezra Stiles
Tokugawa Ienari (1,760 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
great-grandson of the eighth shōgun Tokugawa Yoshimune through his son Munetada (1721–1764), head of the Hitotsubashi branch of the family, and his grandson Harusada
HMS Asia (1764) (798 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
64-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 3 March 1764 at Portsmouth Dockyard. She participated in the American Revolutionary War
Thomas Hancock (merchant) (191 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
Thomas Hancock (July 17, 1703 – August 1, 1764) was a merchant in colonial Boston. Born to Reverend John Hancock and Elizabeth (Clark), he got his start
French ship Zélé (1763) (192 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article
(plans by Coulomb) Laid down: February 1762 Launched: 1 July 1763 In service: 1764 Out of service: 1806 Notes: Offered by the receveurs généraux des finances
Sakai Tadatoshi (81 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
(1746–1779) Sakai Tadayori (1749–1764) Matsudaira Terutaka (1758–1781) Inoue Masatsune (1760–1763) Akimoto Sumitomo (1747–1764, 1765–1767) Abe Masahiro (1837-1857)
Sikh holocaust of 1762 (2,291 words) [view diff] case mismatch in snippet view article find links to article
Sikh Holocaust of 1762 or The Vadda Ghallūghārā (Punjabi: ਵੱਡਾ ਘੱਲੂਘਾਰਾ [ʋəɖɖɑ kə̀lːuɡɑ̀ɾɑ] [the Great Massacre]) was the mass-murder of the unarmed Sikhs
Hogarth Painting the Comic Muse (516 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
and sixth state in 1764. Hogarth used this particular self-portrait as the frontispiece of his collected engravings, published in 1764. The painting depicts
Morten Thrane Brünnich (337 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
collection of Christian Fleischer he became interested in ornithology, and in 1764 he published Ornithologia Borealis, which included the details of many Scandinavian
William Symington (1,401 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
William Symington (1764–1831) was a Scottish engineer and inventor, and the builder of the first practical steamboat, the Charlotte Dundas. Symington was
Fran Gamba (61 words) [view diff] exact match in snippet view article find links to article
country was under the Holy Roman Empire. He became mayor of Ljubljana in 1764. He was succeeded by Janez Mihael Kuk in 1766. "Mayors of Ljubljana:1702-1811"